Public Affairs

PBS NEWSHOUR
Presidential Address

 

President Donald Trump will deliver a televised address Monday on how the U.S. will proceed in the nation’s 16-year war in Afghanistan.

 

Trump met with his national security team, including Defense Secretary James Mattis, on Friday at Camp David, Maryland, to discuss military strategy in Afghanistan. The president took to Twitter on Saturday to say that the talks with military leaders led to “many decisions made, including on Afghanistan.” The president did not offer any clues into the agreed-upon strategy, but several media outlets have indicated that Trump may announce continued U.S. presence in the country.

 

POV
Tribal Justice

 

Follow two Native American judges who reach back to traditional concepts of justice in order to reduce incarceration rates, foster greater safety for their communities, and create a more positive future for their youth.

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
What Happens to Hawai‘i Elders Who Don’t Have a Personal Safety Net?

 

Whether it’s job loss, illness, divorce or other life circumstances, some islanders find themselves at wit’s end, running out of money in retirement. What options do they have? And how are Hawai‘i taxpayers affected? What happens to Hawai‘i elders who don’t have a personal safety net?

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
973-1000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
Retain & Recruit

 

Hawai‘i is now at “full employment,” meaning our statewide, adjusted unemployment rate has fallen below 3 percent. In this tight job market, local and national businesses, big and small, are competing for the most qualified employees. While the gap widens between Hawai‘i’s high cost of living and the average salary scale, how can Hawai‘i workers take advantage of this situation – and how can local companies get creative with attracting qualified job candidates?

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 


INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
Balancing the Endangered and Invasive Among Us

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I gave several environmental agencies a difficult assignment: collaborate, prioritize and come up with a list of the top five indigenous species we must save – and the top five invasive species we must eliminate. The nene (goose), ‘io (hawk) and honu (sea turtle) might be on one list. The coqui frog, miconia and fire ants could be found on the other. Find out the results in this live discussion. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Coordinating Group on Alien Pest Species and The Nature Conservancy were the groups who collaborated on the lists.

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 



INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
The Next Journey

 

INSIGHTS convenes Polynesian Voyaging Society leadership and several crewmembers of the Hōkūle‘a voyaging canoe for a live discussion about their Next Journey. Scheduled to appear are the voyaging society’s President Nainoa Thompson, Hōkūle‘a crewmembers Miki Tomita and Eric Co, and University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa President David Lassner, who was a crewmember on Hōkūle‘a’s U.S. East Coast leg.

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 


INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
Dubious Distinction

 

Hawai‘i has the Dubious Distinction of having more visitor drowning deaths than any other place in the country. According to the State Department of Health, Hawai‘i’s visitor drowning rate is 13 times the national average, and 10 times the rate for residents. This hasn’t gone unnoticed by the national media, and the military refers to water-surrounded Hawai‘i as the Drowning Capital of the U.S. Why is our visitor drowning rate so high and what can be done about it? INSIGHTS poses the question to people who know how to make everyone safer in our waters.

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

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