Royalty

SECRETS OF THE SIX WIVES
Divorced

 

Travel with historian Lucy Worsley back to the Tudor court to witness some of the most dramatic moments in the lives of Henry VIII’s six wives, each of whom found a method of exerting influence. The series combines drama with historical comment.

 

Divorced
Worsley examines the happy marriage of Henry VIII to first wife, Katherine of Aragon. Despite her skill and devotion as his queen, she fails to give Henry the son he needs and he falls for Anne Boleyn.

 

Diana – Her Story

 

Twenty years after Princess Diana’s death, this new film reveals her story in her own words. What emerges is the narrative of a shy young girl who stepped onto the world stage in 1980 and departed in 1997 as its most famous woman.

 

This program will encore Sat., Aug. 26, 10:00 pm

 

King Charles III on MASTERPIECE

 

The hit Broadway show King Charles III is adapted for television. A 2016 Tony nominee for Best Play, the drama imagines Prince Charles’ ascension to the throne following Queen Elizabeth’s death. The late Tim Pigott-Smith stars as Charles.

 

Secrets of Chatsworth

 

Over five centuries, Chatsworth Estate has been passed down through 16 generations of the Cavendish family and is the home of the current 12th Duke of Devonshire and his family. We discover the stories throughout its 500 years that have shaped the history of Chatsworth into the acclaimed and distinguished house it has become.

 

SECRETS OF THE SIX WIVES
Divorced, Beheaded, Survived

 

Travel with historian Lucy Worsley back to the Tudor court to witness some of the most dramatic moments in the lives of Henry VIII’s six wives, each of whom found a method of exerting influence. The series combines drama with historical comment.

 

Divorced, Beheaded, Survived
Worsley presents Henry’s last three wives: Anne of Cleves, called “ugly;” young Catherine Howard, whose tragic childhood was abusive; and finally, the far-from-saintly nurse, Katherine Parr.

 

SECRETS OF THE SIX WIVES
Beheaded, Died

 

Travel with historian Lucy Worsley back to the Tudor court to witness some of the most dramatic moments in the lives of Henry VIII’s six wives, each of whom found a method of exerting influence. The series combines drama with historical comment.

 

Beheaded, Died
Henry breaks with the Roman Church to marry Anne, but as Worsley notes, he grows tired of her and falls for Jane Seymour. Anne’s fate is sealed; she is executed and Henry immediately marries Jane, who dies soon after she gives birth to a son.

 

A Royal Connection

 

Leslie Wilcox, President and CEO of PBS HawaiiBritain’s Queen Victoria, ruler of the most powerful nation in the world in her time, and Queen Emma of Hawai‘i, ali‘i of the most isolated archipelago, formed a friendship that bridged the long distance and the 17-year difference in their ages.

 

It was a friendship born of grief.

 

In the Hawaiian Journal of History, researcher Rhoda E.A. Hackler wrote about the queens’ 20-year, off-and-on correspondence.

 

Queen VictoriaQueen Victoria lost her husband and the father of their nine children when Prince-Consort Albert was just 42. The following year, the four-year-old son of Queen Emma and her husband, King Kamehameha IV (Alexander Liholiho), died of what was then described as “brain fever.” The child was named Albert, after Victoria’s husband.

 

Queen Victoria, still deeply mourning her husband’s death, reached out to Emma:

 

Queen Emma“As a mother you will understand how fully I am able to appreciate the depth of your grief…As a wife, I can sincerely hope that you may be spared the heavier blow which has plunged me into lifelong sorrow, but which makes my heart tenderly alive to all the sorrows of others.”

 

A year later, Emma wrote to Victoria:

 

“My heart is very, very heavy while I make known to Your Majesty that God has visited with me with that great trouble which in your kind and consoling letter you said you hoped I might be spared. On the 30th of November my Husband, of whose danger I had never entertained one thought, expired suddenly, almost while in the act of speaking to me, and it was a long while before they could make me believe that what I saw was death and that he had really left me alone for the remainder of my life.”

 

Victoria’s reply came quickly:

 

“…My bleeding heart can truly sympathize with you in your terrible desolation! A dear & promising only child & a beloved husband have both been taken from you within two years! Time does not heal the really stricken heart!..”

 

Two years after the death of Queen Emma’s husband, she traveled to England, raised money for the construction of the Cathedral of St. Andrew in Honolulu, and met Queen Victoria.

 

Victoria penned in her journal:

 

“Nothing could be nicer or more dignified than her manner…She was dressed in just the same widow’s weeds as I wear.”

 

Later in Emma’s trip, she was accorded the honor of being asked to spend the night at Windsor Castle.

 

Over the years, the queens shared personal news, much of it sad. Victoria lost a grandchild to diphtheria; Emma noted that typhoid fever was ravaging the Islands, killing “the young and the strong.”

 

Always, in this correspondence between royal “dear friends,” there is a sense of gratitude in being able to express profound loss and in being heard and understood.

 

Aloha a hui hou,
Leslie signature

 

SECRETS OF THE DEAD
Resurrecting Richard III

 

In 2011, an incredible archaeological find was made: the bones of King Richard III, buried beneath a parking lot. Richard is thought of as the most evil king to have ruled England, and also as a fearsome warrior, despite the extreme curvature of his spine. Now, scientists are testing the bones to find out more about the king and conducting fascinating experiments to determine whether Richard could have fought so ferociously in battle with such a severe deformity.