African American

AMERICAN MASTERS
Alice Walker: Beauty in Truth

 

Most famous for her seminal novel The Color Purple, writer-activist Alice Walker was born into a family of sharecroppers in rural Georgia in 1944. She came of age during the violent racism and seismic social changes of mid-20th-century America. Her mother, poverty and participation in the civil rights movement were the formative influences on her consciousness, becoming the inherent themes in her writing. The first African American woman to win a Pulitzer Prize for Fiction, Walker continues to shine a light on global human rights issues. Her dramatic life is told with poetry and lyricism, and includes interviews with Steven Spielberg, Danny Glover, Gloria Steinem and Walker herself.

 

The Education of Harvey Gantt

 

In 1960, a talented African-American student from Charleston, Harvey Gantt, graduated from high school and decided to become an architect. Clemson College was the only school in South Carolina that offered a degree in his chosen field. In January of 1963, with the help of NAACP lawyer Matthew J. Perry, Gantt won a lawsuit against Clemson and was peacefully admitted to the college, making him the first African-American student to attend a formerly all-white school in South Carolina.

 

BLACK AMERICA SINCE MLK: AND STILL I RISE
Keep Your Head Up / Touch the Sky

 

Henry Louis Gates, Jr. explores America’s changing racial landscape-celebrating how far we have come toward equality and asking why we still have so far to go. Features conversations with Attorney General Eric Holder, activist DeRay Mckesson and television producer Shonda Rhimes.

 

BLACK AMERICA SINCE MLK: AND STILL I RISE
Out of the Shadows / Move On Up

 

Dr. Henry Louis Gates Jr. takes a personal journey through the last 50 years of African American history, charting the incredible progress made – as well as the obstacles that remain. The program features conversations with Jesse Jackson, Nas and Donna Brazile.

 

America in Black & Blue
A PBS NewsHour Weekend Special

America in Black & Blue, A PBS NewsHour Weekend Special

 

After a week of violence, grief and horror, with five police officers shot dead in Dallas, and two African American men shot dead by police officers in Minnesota and Louisiana, this news special will dig deep to explore the roots of these events, competing accounts of responsibility and justice, and televise the conversation that America is having around so many losses, mutual fears, and also around the common ground where progress may be made. Journalist Alison Stewart anchors, with reports from Newark, New Jersey and Minneapolis, Minnesota.

 

JAZZ
The Adventure (1955-1960)

JAZZ: The Adventure (1955-1960)

 

As rhythm and blues and rock ‘n’ roll erode jazz’s audience, the music nonetheless enjoys a time of tremendous creativity. Tenor saxophonist John Coltrane scores a hit with his version of the show tune “My Favorite Things” and creates some of the most intense music in jazz history.

 

JAZZ
A Masterpiece by Midnight (1961-Present)

JAZZ: A Masterpiece by Midnight. Charles Mingus in 1976

 

In the 1960s, the question of what is jazz and what isn’t rages, dividing audiences, musicians and generations. Miles Davis leads a movement of jazz musicians who incorporate elements of rock and soul into their music.

 

JAZZ
Risk (1945 – 1955)

 

Jazz splinters into different camps: white and black, cool and hot, East and West, traditional and modern. Trumpeter Miles Davis becomes the most influential musician of his generation.

 

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