Cancer

HIKI NŌ
Episode #822

 

TOP STORY:
Students from Wai‘anae High School in West O‘ahu tackle the controversy surrounding commercial dolphin tours. On August 23, 2016, NOAA (the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) published a regulation prohibiting tour boats from being within 50 yards of a spinner dolphin, including swimming with them. This regulation has caused a major downturn in business for ocean tour companies such as Sea Hawaii, which claims it has seen a 90% decrease in revenues since the ruling was put into effect.

 

ALSO FEATURED:
–Middle school students from Island School on Kaua‘i teach us how to make a puka shell necklace.

 

–Students from Kalaheo High School in Windward O‘ahu tell us about a camp for the siblings of young cancer patients.

 

–Students from Mid-Pacific on O‘ahu introduce us to education innovator Ted Dintersmith.

 

–In their HIKI NŌ debut, students from Highlands Intermediate School on O‘ahu show us how to salsa dance.

 

–Students from President William McKinley High School in Honolulu tell the story of a McKinley alumnus and banker who has dedicated a great deal of his life to America’s pastime.

 

–Students at Wai‘anae Intermediate School in West O‘ahu report on a new program on their campus designed to get kids to show up for school.

 

–And the students at Kalani High School in East Honolulu feature a young tie-dye designer who channels the spirit of the 1960s in her clothing line.

 

This program encores Saturday, June 17, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, June 18, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

Painted Nails

 

Van Hoang, a Vietnamese immigrant and nail salon owner in San Francisco, sees her American dream begin to crumble with the discovery that her health problems, which include two miscarriages, are the result of toxic chemicals in products used in her salon. She unintentionally becomes involved in the national fight to bring reform to an $8.54 billion industry that touches the lives of nearly every woman in America.

 

PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS
The Land of Eb

 

This fictional story is set in the stark volcanic landscape of one of the most remote communities on Hawai‘i Island – Hawaiian Ocean View Estates. Jonithen Jackson portrays Jacob, a Marshallese immigrant father and grandfather, who struggles to provide for his large family. When Jacob overhears a cancer diagnosis from his doctor he keeps the news to himself, forgoing treatment in favor of working to pay off his property which he plans to pass down once he’s gone. Sensing his end, Jacob turns a small video camera on himself and begins to record his story – and that of his people, the Marshallese. The film is a contemplative look at a community in Hawaii still struggling to recover from the effects of the nuclear age. It is a profoundly realistic portrayal of one man’s unwillingness to let go of his dignity and the hope he has for his family’s future.

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode #806

 

TOP STORY
Adults today bemoan the fact that members of the younger generation spend all of their waking hours on their smartphones. Young people from that very generation – students from Kapa‘a Middle School on Kaua‘i will surprise viewers with their video primer on “Ten Things To Do When You’re NOT On Your Smartphone.” The activities they feature include making new friends, volunteering for a worthy cause, learning a new hobby – all things that take you away from the virtual world of your screen and into engaging with people face-to-face in the actual, physical world.

 

ALSO FEATURED
Students at Kapolei High School in Central O‘ahu tell the story of a school fun-run that was renamed to honor a teacher’s daughter who passed away from cancer.

 

Students at Konawaena High School in the Kona district of Hawai‘i Island tell the poignant story of a same-sex married couple whose love lives on after the tragic death of one partner.

 

Students from Radford High School in the Salt Lake district of O‘ahu tell the story of a football coach who makes life lessons a priority over winning.

 

Students from Kua O Ka La Miloli‘i Hipu‘u Virtual Academy in South Kona show us how to make unique t-shirt prints out of recycled materials.

 

And students from Kainalu Elementary School on the Windward side of O‘ahu show us how to use earthworms to make a nutrient-rich type of fertilizer.

 

This program encores Saturday, Dec. 24 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Dec. 25 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 



POV
Thank You for Playing

 

When Ryan Green, a video game programmer, learns that his young son Joel has cancer, he and his wife document their emotional journey with a video game, “That Dragon, Cancer.” It evolves from a cathartic exercise into an acclaimed work of art.

 

HIKI NŌ
Hawaian Value: Ho’omau

 

This is the premiere episode of HIKI NŌ Season 7, and the first in a series of six shows in which each episode focuses on a specific Hawaiian value.

 

The Hawaiian value for this show is ho’omau, which means to persevere, perpetuate, or continue.

 

The top story comes from the students at Maui High School, who follow former UH Wahine Volleyball star Cecilia Fernandez as she battles adenocarcinoma, a rare form of lung cancer. As a former athlete, Cecilia is used to contesting opponents by following a carefully devised game-plan. But because so little is known about this disease, Cecilia must persevere against an enemy she is not familiar with: uncertainty.

 

Also featured are these student stories:
Roosevelt High School on Oahu tell the story of Papahana Kuaola, a non-profit organization in Kaneohe that contributes to the preservation of Hawaiian culture through the preservation of land and native plants, public awareness and the use of chant.

 

Kapolei High School on Oahu profile Kapolei football player Papu Uti, who lost his leg from a debilitating accident but expects to return to playing football with a prosthetic leg.

 

Connections Public Charter School on Hawaii Island feature world-renowned slack key guitarist Cyril Pahinui, who continues his father Gabby Pahinui’s legacy by using his father’s teaching methods at workshops.

 

Ke Kula Niihau O Kekaha Public Charter School on Kauai tells the story of teacher Hope Kaimi Strickland who, raised on Niihau Island, honors her deceased husband’s wishes for their children to learn her Hawaiian culture and Niihau Hawaiian dialect.

 

Waianae Intermediate School on Oahu feature fellow student Crystal Cebedo. Crystal deals with the uncontrollable aspects of her life, such as her mother’s cancer, by keeping busy and meeting life’s challenges.

 

Konawaena High School on Hawaii Island shows us how the Kona Historical Society built an authentic, old-fashioned Portuguese oven for baking bread as a part of its efforts to recreate the traditions of old Kona.

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by students from Radford High School on Oahu.

 

This program encores Saturday, Aug. 6 at 12:30 pm and Sunday, Aug. 7 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 


Jimmy Borges:
Faced It All

A video clip from Jimmy Borges: Faced It All. Jimmy performs Night and Day

 

In tribute to the late Jimmy Borges, PBS Hawai‘i presents this encore special performance, taped in December, 2015. “Faced It All” is a phrase from the classic song “My Way” that Borges was often asked to sing.

 

The performance, to an audience of 50 handpicked friends and family, also featured Bruce Hamada (upright bass), Mike Lewis (horn), Dan Del Negro (piano) and Noel Okimoto (drums).

Borges made it clear that this was a time of celebration, not mourning. Between songs, he shared funny anecdotes and heartfelt insights.

 

“I’m living the life I have chosen to live,” Borges said. “Tonight is not about ‘poor Jimmy.’ Tonight is about sharing my music with all of you. Tonight we are telling someone out there that we care enough to invest in their future.”

 

“I’m living the life I have chosen to live,” Borges said. “Tonight is not about ‘poor Jimmy.’ Tonight is about sharing my music with all of you. Tonight we are telling someone out there that we care enough to invest in their future.”

 

Borges was referring to future recipients of a University of Hawai‘i vocal music scholarship that his friends established in his name. Borges hoped it would encourage Hawai‘i teens to pursue their dreams, just as he had done during his 60-year music career. “There’s no such thing as a stop sign,” Borges said. “Just speed bumps.”

 


 

To see more on Jimmy Borges, you can also view his guest appearance on Long Story Short with Leslie Wilcox:

Jimmy Borges: The First Verse

Jimmy Borges: The Ballad Continues

 



INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
The Road to Medical Marijuana

 

Hawai‘i legalized medical marijuana in 2000, but it’s been a long and bumpy road to establishing a dispensary system. The latest delay came on April 13, with the State Health Department saying it needs more time to access criminal histories of finalists for licenses to grow and sell medical marijuana. In the meantime, patients and caregivers have been growing their own cannabis.

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
973-1000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

HIKI NŌ
Kamehameha Schools Hawaii Middle School

 

TOP STORY
Students from Kapaa Middle School on Kauai tell the story of Joe Young, a retired police officer who is also a prostate cancer survivor. Mr. Young decided against traditional medical treatments, such as surgery and chemotherapy. Instead he changed his lifestyle and focused on doing things that make him happy. Through this approach and with the support of his family, Mr. Young is now cancer free.

 

ALSO FEATURED:
Students from Konawaena High School on Hawaii Island profile a driver’s education instructor who teaches teens the rules of the road to help prevent accidents and save lives.

 

Students from Saint Francis School on Oahu introduce us to Manny Mattos, a retired HPD officer who collects traditional Hawaiian war weapons and educates the public on conservation efforts to preserve the indigenous woods the weapons are made from.

 

From the HIKI NŌ archives: Students from Ke Kula Niihau O Kekaha on Kauai present a story about how a traditional Hawaiian hale (house) is built.

 

Students from Maui High School profile Chantal Sandoval, a deaf Junior Varsity cheerleader who explains that the biggest challenge for her is the social stigma attached to being deaf.

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by Kamehameha Schools Hawaii Middle School in Keaau on the Big Island.

 

This program encores Saturday, March 26 at 12:30 pm and Sunday, March 27 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 



NOVA
Creatures of Light

NOVA: Creatures of Light

 

NOVA and National Geographic take a dazzling dive to explore how and why so many of the ocean’s creatures light up, revealing a hidden undersea world where creatures flash, sparkle, shimmer or glow.

 

Join deep sea scientists who investigate these stunning displays and discover surprising ways to harness nature’s light – from tracking cancer cells to detecting pollution, lighting up cities, and even illuminating the inner workings of our brains.

 

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