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HIKI NŌ
Focus on Compassion: Animals

 

The final installment of the four-part Focus on Compassion HIKI NŌ series focuses on peoples’ compassion toward animals, including house pets, working pets, exotic animals and endangered species. Like the previous three shows, this episode is hosted by Crystal Cebedo, a 2016 HIKI NŌ and Wai‘anae High School graduate who is currently attending Menlo College in Atherton, California.

 

The outstanding HIKI NŌ stories in this Focus on Compassion show include:

 

–“Dog Adoption” from Kapa‘a High School on Kaua‘i: a look at a creative program initiated by the Kaua‘i Humane Society to promote dog adoptions through visitors taking the animals on nearby field trips.

 

–“Towards No More Homeless Pets” from Lahaina Intermediate School on Maui: a feature on the spay/neuter clinic conducted by the Maui Humane Society to compassionately address and prevent the overpopulation of homeless cats on the island.

 

–“Three Ring Ranch” from Kealakehe High School on the island of Hawai‘i: the story of how one woman’s life work to protect and educate about exotic animals was inspired by the animals who helped her recover from a debilitating accident.

 

–“Passion for Service” from Seabury Hall Middle School on Maui: the story of a young woman who spent almost half her life volunteering at Assistance Dogs of Hawaii, a program that trains dogs to assist people with special needs.

 

–“Wounded Warriors” from Waialua High and Intermediate School on O‘ahu: a feature on the work of Hawaii Fi-do, an organization that trains service companion dogs, and the positive impact one of their companion dogs had on a Schofield soldier in the Wounded Warrior Project.

 

–“Nene” from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kaua‘i: a look at the multi- state agency project of removing a flock of nene, Hawai‘i’s state bird, nesting on Kaua‘i Lagoon between the two runways at Līhu‘e Airport to a safer location for the birds and the public.

 

–“Mālama NOAA” from Āliamanu Middle School on O‘ahu: a feature on the efforts of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to protect and preserve the endangered Hawaiian monk seal population through medical care of sick or injured seals, the enforcement of laws, and through community education.

 

–“Hokulani” from Mid-Pacific on O‘ahu: the story of a Pomeranian that spreads joy wherever it goes.

 

This program encores Saturday, Aug. 26, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Aug. 27, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode #823

 

This episode features stories from the 2017 HIKI NŌ Spring Challenge, in which production teams from HIKI NŌ schools took the challenge of creating stories on the theme Mālama Honua (Taking Care of Our Island Planet) over three days. The theme – which is based on the mission of the Polynesian Voyaging Society’s world-wide voyage – was revealed to the students at the beginning of the three-day production time limit.

 

TOP STORY
Students from Nānākuli High and Intermediate School on O‘ahu present their interpretation of Mālama Honua in a story about Veronika Sumyatina, a foreign exchange student from war-torn Ukraine who finds a new home, and the meaning of aloha, at Nānākuli High and Intermediate School. Veronika explains that home is much more than a roof over one’s head – home is “where your heart is.” By accepting an outsider as one of their own, the Nānākuli students do their part in taking care of our island planet.

 

ALSO FEATURED:

 

–Students from Moanalua High School on O‘ahu feature a female angler whose love of fishing is matched only by her respect for the eco-system from which she partakes.

 

–Students from Wai‘anae High School in West O‘ahu follow a woman who volunteers to mend and replace the pedestrian walking flags that keep people safe when crossing the very dangerous Farrington Highway.

 

–Students from Ewa Makai Middle School on O‘ahu feature the OSPCA, a non-profit organization that cares for abandoned and neglected cats and dogs.

 

–Students from Punahou School on O‘ahu follow a group of motivated community members who are cleaning up Kawainui Marsh in Kailua.

 

–Students from Kalama Intermediate School in Upcountry Maui show how recycling is a way of life on their campus.

 

–Students from Kapolei High School on O‘ahu follow the eco-friendly phenomenon of Hydro Flasks.

 

This episode is hosted by Hali‘amaile Kealoha and Hulukoa Nunokawa, both seniors at Kamehameha School Kapālama.

 

This program encores Saturday, June 24, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, June 25, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Top Story: H.P. Baldwin High School – HC&S (Hawaii Commercial and Sugar) employees

 

TOP STORY:

 

Students from H.P. Baldwin High School in Wailuku, Maui present poignant portraits of two long-time HC&S (Hawaii Commercial and Sugar) employees: machinist Wes Bissen and millwright Koa Martin. HC&S is the last remaining sugar mill in Hawaii and will be closing at the end of 2016. The mill opened 144 years ago. The closure will result in 675 employees losing their jobs.

 

Martin’s father and grandfather worked for HC&S before him. Bissen started working at HC&S in 1981. His father was also a machinist for the company. The two reflect on their careers at HC&S and their families’ histories with the company. They also discuss the state funds being allotted to help the laid off workers through the transition. Says Bissen, “You know, it’s sad that they’re going to close, but we’re all big boys. We’ve got to focus on how it’s going to affect everybody and just try to build a better life from here on.”

 

ALSO FEATURED:

 

Students from Kapolei High School on Oahu tell the story of their annual basketball event for Best Buddies, a program that helps to integrate students with intellectual and mental disabilities into the social fabric of the school.

 

Students from Aliamanu Middle School in the Salt Lake district of Oahu take us behind the scenes of their school’s nerve center – the front office.

 

Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle introduce us to a surfer- turned-chef who runs the popular Like Poke food truck on Maui.

 

Students from Kapaa Middle School on Kauai tell us about a community organization that feels they have one solution to Kauai’s feral cat problem.

 

And students from Maui Waena Intermediate School in Kahului, Maui show us how a married couple is living out its golden years at a Maui senior day care center.

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by Mililani High School in Central Oahu.

 

This program encores Saturday, July 2 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, July 3 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

NATURE
Pets: Wild at Heart: Playful Creatures

 

In this program filled with innovative photography and scientific revelation, we investigate how our favorite pets get in touch with their wild side through play. From talkative budgies, marathon-running hamsters, wall-climbing cats and diving dogs, discover how our pets’ playful games are just a whisker away from the wild.

 

GORONGOSA PARK: REBIRTH OF PARADISE
Lion Paradise / Elephant Whisperer

 

Experience the inspiring rebirth of an African wilderness through the eyes of Emmy Award-winning wildlife cameraman Bob Poole. Darting lions, wrestling crocs, facing down angry elephants – it’s all part of a day’s work as he joins the battle to “re-wild” Mozambique’s legendary national park.

 

Lion Mystery
Poole joins scientist Paola Bouley as she tries to solve a baffling mystery: Why isn’t Gorongosa’s lion population growing? Poole follows five cheeky lion cubs on their journey to adulthood.

 

Elephant Whisperer
Poole and his sister Joyce, a renowned elephant expert, face charging elephants to gain insights into their behavior. Meanwhile, Mt. Gorongosa is taken over by a group of rebel soldiers, creating a tense air of uncertainty and fear in the park.

 

NATURE
The Sagebrush Sea

 

One of the most overlooked ecosystems on the continent consists of a massive sea of sagebrush that stretches across 11 states in the American West. This spartan yet spectacular landscape supports more than 170 species of hardscrabble birds and mammals. Among those that have adapted to survive here are birds found nowhere else: greater sage-grouse that lead remarkable lives mostly hidden in the sage. But once each year, males emerge for days on end to strut and display as prospective mates for discriminating females, which mate with only one or two of them. Females must then raise their chicks on their own, with little food, water or shelter to sustain them, while plenty of predators wait for their smallest mistake. Today, they must also contend with wells and pipelines tapping the resources buried deep below. The sagebrush and the grouse carry on, but they’re losing ground.

 

NATURE
Siberian Tiger Quest

 

Ecologist Chris Morgan has tracked large predators in some of the wildest and most remote places on earth. He now embarks on a challenge that will fulfill a lifelong dream – to find and film a Siberian tiger living wild and free in Russia’s far eastern forests. The film features the work of Korean cameraman Sooyong Park, the first individual ever to film Siberian tigers in the wild. Park spent years in the forest tracking and filming the world’s biggest cat.