fishing

GLOBE TREKKER
Tough Boats: The Arctic

GLOBE TREKKER - Tough Boats: The Arctic

 

Trekker Ian Wright travels to the high Arctic from the coast of northern Norway. His Arctic journey starts in fishing port of Tromso, more than 200 miles north of the Arctic Circle. From here, aboard the fishing trawler Hermes, he travels another 300 miles north to rich fishing ground near remote Bear Island. Later, he transfers to a small Arctic cruise ship that takes just a dozen or so passengers around the islands in search of polar bears and other wildlife.

 

NHK MARCH SPECIALS
Five Years, Five Stories

 

When the massive earthquake and tsunami struck Japan’s Tohoku region six years ago, life as people knew it was instantly gone. Among the survivors were children, who experienced the disaster and its aftermath at an impressionable time in their lives. The documentary shares five stories of those children, looking at how they have struggled with the past, and follows them as they search for a way to move forward.

 

A CRAFTSMAN’S LEGACY
The Fly Rod Makers

 

Host Eric Gorges combs the country for America’s finest craftsmen, documenting what it means to be a modern-day maker. In each episode, Eric explains the history of an old-world craft as it is practiced in America today.

 

The Fly Rod Makers
Eric and master bamboo fly rod makers, Jeff Wagner and Casimira Orlowski, make a rod together, underscoring Eric’s belief that “a bad day of fishing is better than a good day at work.”

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode #811 – Best Writing – Middle School

 

The third in a series of seven 2017 HIKI NŌ Award nominee shows highlights the nominees for Best Writing, Middle School Division. The nominees include:

 

–A story on the inner-workings of their school’s front office by students at Aliamanu Middle School (O‘ahu);

 

–A report on Kaua‘i’s canine search and rescue squad by students at Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School (Kaua‘i);

 

–The story of a community volunteer group that does laundry for people who don’t have the means to do their own by students at Kapa‘a Middle School (Kaua‘i);

 

–A report on how a community pulled together to air-condition 90-plus degree classrooms by students at Lahaina Intermediate School (Maui);

 

–A story from students at Mililani Middle School (O‘ahu) about a student-staffed restoration of an ancient Hawaiian fishing site in Honolulu’s airport industrial area.

 

Kamehameha Schools – Maui Middle School

 

This episode is hosted by Kukui Raymond from Wai‘anae High School (O‘ahu) and Noah Faumuina from Castle High School (O‘ahu).

 

This program encores Saturday, Feb. 11 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Feb. 12 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 



A CRAFTSMAN’S LEGACY
The Yarn Spinner

 

This episode is all about hoof to hat. Meet Maple Smith, a retired schoolteacher who raises her own alpacas, sheers their coats, and spins yarn. Eric gets out of his comfort zone and starts knitting!

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode #720

 

This special edition of HIKI NŌ highlights some of the best stories from the spring quarter of the 2015-16 school year. The show is hosted by Waianae High School Class of 2016 graduate and HIKI NŌ standout Crystal Cebedo, who will be attending Menlo College in Atherton, California on a full scholarship. Besides introducing seven outstanding stories, Crystal takes us on her HIKI NŌ journey – from her Waianae Intermediate School story about dealing with her mother’s terminal cancer, to learning leadership skills on her Waianae High School HIKI NŌ productions.

 

The outstanding HIKI NŌ stories in this compilation show include:

 

“Opelu Fishing” from Kua o ka La Milolii Hipuu Virtual Academy on Hawaii Island: a look at traditional and sustainable Hawaiian opelu fishing in the remote South Kona fishing village of Milolii.

 

“K-9 Search and Rescue” from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kauai: a feature on how Kauai’s canine search and rescue team takes the bond between man and man’s best friend to new heights.

 

“Hawaiian Steel Guitar” from Ka Waihona o ka Naauao Public Charter School in Nanakuli, Oahu: a history of the invention and promotion of the Hawaiian Steel Guitar by Joseph Kekuku of Laie, Oahu.

 

“Without Home” from Waianae High School in West Oahu: a look at a self-managed, self-governed homeless encampment in Waianae and how its residents have developed a broader, more universal definition of home.

 

“Haleakala Mules” from Seabury Hall Middle School on Maui: a nuts and bolts look at how a mule team gets important environmental work done deep in Haleakala National Park.

 

“Laurie Rubin” from Hongwanji Mission School on Oahu: the story of accomplished singer, teacher and theatrical producer/director Laurie Rubin, who dispels many of the myths about how blind people (of which she is one) navigate through life.

 

“Life After Sugar” from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui: Conversations with two employees of Hawaiian Commercial & Sugar Co. – the last sugar mill in Hawaii – whose upcoming closing will mark the end of the Hawaii’s sugar industry. The two employees, whose families have worked at HC&S for generations, reminisce about the past and speculate on their future.

 

This episode congratulates all 2016 High School graduates who participated in HIKI NŌ and recognizes each of them in the credits.

 

This program encores Saturday, Sept. 24 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Sept. 25 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Top Story: Kua O ka La Milolii Hipuu Virtual Academy: Traditional Opelu Fishing

 

TOP STORY:

 

Students from Kua O ka La Milolii Hipuu Virtual Academy Public Charter School on Hawaii Island tell the story of traditional opelu fishing in the remote South Kona fishing village of Milolii. For many Milolii residents, opelu fishing is more than a tradition – it is a means of survival. Families sell their catch as their main source of income and are trying to pass the practice down to their children so that the tradition and income source can continue.

 

ALSO FEATURED:

 

Students from Kapaa Middle School on the Garden Isle tell the story of a local church group that provides free laundry services for the needy.

 

Students from Wheeler Middle School in Central Oahu profile a recently arrived military dependent who has fallen in love with the hula.

 

Continuing the theme of outsiders embracing Hawaiian culture, a mainland transplant becomes the Hawaiian Studies teacher at St. Andrew’s Priory in Honolulu (a story from the HIKI NŌ archives).

 

Students from Konawaena High School on Hawaii Island show us how they are inspired by a Hilo physician who, as a high school student, was the least likely person to ever become a doctor.

 

And from Mililani Middle School in Central Oahu, a special needs language arts teacher expresses himself by painting large, colorful portraits.

 

This program encores Saturday, June 11 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, June 12 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

PACIFIC HEARTBEAT
Nā Loea: The Masters II

 

From sustainable fishing and land management practices, to preserving traditional language and arts, this program shares the stories of native Hawaiians who have dedicated their lives to practice, preserve and pass on knowledge and expertise accumulated over years. Featured are: Mac Poepoe, a Native Hawaiian fisherman and a community leader on Molokai who has dedicated his life to ensuring that the ocean will be well-stocked for generations to come; and Herbert Hoe, who recognized how the widespread health afflictions of the Native Hawaiian people impaired their ability to care for themselves, and created his ‘Ai Pono diet program utilizing the traditional foods of ancient Hawaiians.

 

INDEPENDENT LENS
The Great Invisible

 

On April 20, 2010, a disastrous explosion took place on the Deepwater Horizon offshore oil-drilling rig in the Gulf of Mexico. After two days ablaze, the Deepwater Horizon sank, causing the largest offshore oil spill in American history. The spill flowed unabated for almost three months, dumping hundreds of millions of gallons of oil in the ocean, shutting down the local fishing industry, polluting the fragile ecosystem, and raising serious questions about the safety of continued offshore drilling.

 

Eyewitnesses provide first-hand accounts of the tragedy from the moment of the explosion to its still unfolding repercussions. The film brings a new and unique perspective to the ongoing tension between the haves and the have-nots, exploring the crisis through the eyes of oil industry executives, survivors, and local residents who are left to pick up the pieces while the world moves on.