Kauai High School

HIKI NŌ
Focus on Compassion: Self-Identity

 

The third of four Focus on Compassion HIKI NŌ episodes compiles archived stories that center on the theme of compassion for self-identity. This four-episode series is hosted by Crystal Cebedo, a 2016 HIKI NŌ and Wai‘anae High School graduate who is currently attending Menlo College in Atherton, California. The stories in this episode look specifically at compassion for self-identity in terms of culture, gender, body image, ethnicity, or appearance.

 

The outstanding HIKI NŌ stories in this Focus on Compassion show include:

 

“Calcee Nance” from Kaua‘i High School on Kaua‘i: the story of a teen mentor at the Boys and Girls Club whose instinct to nurture and feed others was inspired by her relationship with her late mother.

 

“Kimberly Yap” from Lahainaluna High School on Maui: the story of a young woman whose decisions about her future are complicated by her multicultural identity as a half-Filipina, half-Micronesian born in Kiribati and raised on Maui.

 

“Mark Yamanaka” from Mid-Pacific on O‘ahu: a feature on Mark Yamanaka, a Nā Hōkū Hanohano Award-winning musician, who overcame internal conflicts about being a non-Hawaiian playing Hawaiian music. He has since been embraced by the Hawaiian music community for his commitment to learning and singing in the Hawaiian language and his skillful guitar playing.

 

“Cosplay” from Waiākea High School on Hawai‘i Island: a look at how cosplay – dressing up as characters from books, movies, or your own imagination – gave a group of high school students the freedom to express their true selves in a creative and fun way.

 

“Body Image” from Maui Waena Intermediate School on Maui: a look at how the images of females onscreen and in magazines had a negative impact on one girl’s self-image and self-confidence.

 

“Through Rachel’s Camera” from ‘Iolani School on O‘ahu: the story of a young woman who uses her camera and art to combat traditional gender stereotypes and to express her identity as a feminist and activist.

 

“Pride and Diversity” from Moanalua High School on O‘ahu: a feature on how the Honolulu Pride Parade and Festival helps support and encourage LGBTQ youth who often don’t see themselves reflected in their school or local communities.

 

“Aurora’s Story” from Wai‘anae Intermediate School on O‘ahu: a look at how one teacher uses her experience with trichotillomania, an impulse disorder that results in her pulling out her hair, to teach her students about self-acceptance.

 

This program encores Saturday, Aug. 19, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Aug. 20, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 


HIKI NŌ
Episode #819

 

TOP STORY:

 

Students from Kapolei High School on O‘ahu present a story on the Hawai‘i-themed artwork engraved on the columns of O‘ahu’s rail project. The column art was designed by local architect Daniel Kanekuni and, according to HART spokesperson Bill Brennan, adds a sense of place and local identity to the rail project. Rail proponents and opponents alike feel that the column artwork is a good thing. However, some rail opponents, such as UH Professor of Civil Engineering Panos Prevedouros, feel that the real eye-sore will be the elevated rail stations. Says Prevedouros, “How much lipstick do they think they can put on that pig?”

 

ALSO FEATURED:

 

–Students from Maui Waena Intermediate School show how a Kahului family’s mochi- pounding tradition continues, despite the recent loss of the family matriarch who had been the heart of the event.

 

–Students from Hawai‘i Technology Academy in Leeward O‘ahu show us the proper way to pack a military care package.

 

–Students from Konawaena High School on Hawai‘i Island profile a Konawaena graduate who went on to form the internationally renowned heavy metal reggae band Pepper.

 

–Students from Moanalua High School on O‘ahu profile a lesbian couple at their school who work to spread the joy of diversity and the message of tolerance for those who are different.

 

–Students from Maui High School profile a star athlete who had to sit out the football season because of a heart condition but continued to inspire his teammates by volunteering as an assistant coach.

 

This program encores Saturday, May 27, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, May 28, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 


HIKI NŌ
Episode #818

 

TOP STORY
Students from Kaua‘i High School in Lihu‘e introduce a new story genre to HIKI NŌ: the Personal Essay. In her essay “The Fact of You,” Kaua‘i High School student Haven Luper-Jasso explores the nature of truth. It opens with her thoughts on the matter: “The word FACT can be defined as a true piece of information. And in our day and age where information and messages are bombarding us from every angle every second of the day, that’s all we really want in life: truth.”

 

She goes on to explore not just the nature of factual truth, but also the truth within one’s own self: “Your life is the greatest masterpiece you will ever produce…Let it be genuine, true to who you are. Because that is who you were created to be. And that is a fact I can guarantee with a hundred percent certainty.”

 

ALSO FEATURED:

 

–Students from Waipahu High School on O‘ahu explore the mysterious origins of their studentbody-wide cheering tradition known as the Arthur Awards.

 

–Students from Ewa Makai Middle School on O‘ahu uncover the caring person behind the tough façade of their vice principal.

 

–Students from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kaua‘i tell the story of Team Unify, a non-profit organization that helps students without disabilities bond with students who have disabilities.

 

–Students from Sacred Hearts Academy on O‘ahu introduce us to two local fashion designers who give younger, up-and-coming designers hands-on experience in the fashion business.

 

–Ka‘ala Elementary School on O‘ahu makes its HIKI NŌ debut with a video primer on aquaponics. (Ka‘ala Elementary School is only the second elementary school to produce for HIKI NŌ. The first was Kainalu Elementary School in windward O‘ahu.)

 

This program encores Saturday, April 8, at 12:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode #813 – Best Achievement in Cinematography and Editing

 

The fifth in a series of seven 2017 HIKI NŌ Award nominee shows highlights the nominees for:

 

–Best Franchise Piece (Hana K-12 School on Maui, Kalani High School on O‘ahu, Kapa‘a Middle School on Kaua‘i, Kaua‘i High School, Moloka‘i High School, Pacific Buddhist Academy on O‘ahu);

 

–Best Factoid (Hana K-12 School on Maui, Hawai‘i Preparatory Academy on Hawai‘i Island; Konawaena High School on Hawai‘i Island, Mililani High School on O‘ahu, McKinley High School on O‘ahu);

 

–Best Achievement in Cinematography and Editing (Kapa‘a Middle School on Kaua‘i, Maui High School, Moanalua High School on O‘ahu, Sacred Hearts Academy on O‘ahu, and Wai‘anae High School on O‘ahu).

 

This episode is hosted by Alyssa Ryhn from Castle High School (O‘ahu) and Desiree Kanui from Nanakuli Intermediate School (O‘ahu).

 

This program encores Saturday, Feb. 25 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Feb. 26 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 



HIKI NŌ
Episode #812 – Best Writing – High School

 

The fourth in a series of seven 2017 HIKI NŌ Award nominee shows highlights the nominees for Best Writing, High School Division. The nominees include:

 

–A story from Kapolei High School (O‘ahu) about a high school basketball game that creates a bond between special needs students and the rest of the student body;

 

–A report from Kaua‘i High School (Kaua‘i) on the inner-workings of the Garden Island’s biomass plant;

 

–A story from Kua O Ka La Miloli‘i Hipu‘u Virtual Academy PCS (Hawai‘i Island) on the Miloli‘i tradition of opelu fishing;

 

–A report from Sacred Hearts Academy (O‘ahu) about the degenerative effect texting has on our spines;

 

–A story from Saint Francis School (O‘ahu) about a young entrepreneur who was inspired by the memory of his late mother to open an innovative ice cream parlor;

 

–And from Waiakea High School (Hawai‘i Island), a look into the strange and fascinating world of cosplay.

 

This episode is hosted by Lara Sato from Castle High School (O‘ahu) and Zaccai Ceruti from James Campbell High School (O‘ahu).

 

This program encores Saturday, Feb. 18 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Feb. 19 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 



2017 HIKI NŌ AWARDS RESULTS

HIKI NŌ Awards Nominees March 23, 2017

 

The 2017 HIKI NŌ Awards

PBS Hawai‘i recognizes exceptional storytelling skills of middle and high school students throughout our Islands who participate in HIKI NŌ, our statewide digital learning initiative and student news program.

 

The nominees were chosen from HIKI NŌ shows that aired during the 2015-2016 school year and the Fall Semester of this current school year. You can view each nominated piece by clicking on its name in the list below. (You can also watch the nominated projects, by category, Thursdays at 7:30 pm, Saturdays at noon, and Sundays at 3:00 pm on PBS Hawai’i.)

 

This year’s Gold, Silver and Bronze winners are indicated below. Winning stories, as well as highlights from this year’s awards celebrations, will be featured on our two-part 2017 HIKI NŌ Awards Show, Thursday, March 23 and Thursday, March 30 at 7:30 pm on PBS Hawai‘i. Congratulations to all nominees and winners – and mahalo to all the students, teachers and mentors who help make HIKI NŌ a success in our public, private and charter schools throughout Hawai‘i.

 


 

BEST PERSONAL PROFILE — MIDDLE SCHOOL DIVISION

Aliamanu Middle School (O‘ahu) – “Homeschooled Student” SILVER

Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School (Kaua‘i) – “Moses Hamilton” GOLD

Hongwanji Mission School (O‘ahu) – “Laurie Rubin” BRONZE

Kapaʻa Middle School (Kaua‘i) – “Joe Young”

Seabury Hall Middle School (Maui) – “John Plunkett”

 

BEST PERSONAL PROFILE — HIGH SCHOOL DIVISION

H.P. Baldwin High School (Maui) – “Bipolar Artist”

James Campbell High School (O‘ahu) – “Miracle Baby” GOLD

Maui High School (Maui) – “Marc Unites”

Mid-Pacific (O‘ahu) – “Ukulele Hale” BRONZE

Wai‘anae High School (O‘ahu) – “Living With Pain” SILVER

 

BEST WRITING — MIDDLE SCHOOL DIVISION

Aliamanu Middle School (O‘ahu) – “Front Office”

Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School (Kaua‘i) – “K-9 Search & Rescue” GOLD

Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle (Maui) – “Feed My Sheep”

Kapaʻa Middle School (Kaua‘i) – “Love Laundry” BRONZE

Lahaina Intermediate School (Maui) – “Airconditioning”

Mililani Middle School (O‘ahu) – “Mokauea Island” SILVER

 

BEST WRITING — HIGH SCHOOL DIVISION

Kapolei High School (O‘ahu) – “Best Buddies Basketball”

Kaua‘i High School (Kaua‘i) – “Biomass” GOLD

Kua O Ka La Miloli‘i Hipu‘u Virtual Academy PCS (Hawai‘i Island) – “Opelu Fishing” BRONZE

Sacred Hearts Academy (O‘ahu) – “Text Neck” SILVER

Saint Francis School (O‘ahu) – “Lucy’s Lab Creamery”

Waiakea High School (Hawai‘i Island) – “Cosplay”

 

BEST OVERALL STORY — MIDDLE SCHOOL DIVISION

Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School (Kaua‘i) – “Dog Wheelchair”

Kapaʻa Middle School (Kaua‘i) – “Firefighter”

Ka Waihona o Ka Naʻauao PCS (O‘ahu) – “Steel Guitar” BRONZE

Seabury Hall Middle School (Maui) – “Haleakala Mules” SILVER

Wai‘anae Intermediate School (O‘ahu)– “A Home For Larenzo” GOLD

 

BEST OVERALL STORY — HIGH SCHOOL DIVISION

H.P. Baldwin High School (Maui) – “Life After Sugar”

Kapa‘a High School (Kaua‘i) – “Iloreta Brothers” GOLD

Konawaena High School (Hawai‘i Island) – “A Love Story”

Maui High School (Maui) – “Deaf Cheerleader” BRONZE

Waiʻanae High School (O‘ahu) – “Without Home” SILVER

 

BEST FRANCHISE PIECE

Hana K-12 (Maui) – “Ti Leaf Print”

Kalani High School (O‘ahu) – “Thaumatrope”

Kapa‘a Middle School (Kaua‘i) – “10 Things To Do When You’re NOT On Your Smartphone” GOLD

Kaua‘i High School (Kaua‘i) – “Hurricane Protection” BRONZE

Moloka‘i High School (Moloka‘i) “Text-A-Tip

Pacific Buddhist Academy (O‘ahu) – “Offering Incense” SILVER

 

BEST ACHIEVEMENT IN CINEMATOGRAPHY & EDITING

Kapa‘a Middle School (Kaua‘i) – “Junior Lifeguard”

Maui High School (Maui) – “Tourette” GOLD

Moanalua High School (O‘ahu) – “Equestrian” SILVER

Sacred Hearts Academy (O‘ahu) – “IUCN”

Wai‘anae High School (O‘ahu) – “Parental Guidance Required” BRONZE

 

BEST FACTOID

Hana K-12  (Maui) – “School History”

Hawaiʻi Preparatory Academy (Hawai‘i Island) – “Solar Trees” GOLD

Konawaena High School (Hawai‘i Island) – “Wildcats”

Mililani High School (O‘ahu) – “Red Dirt” BRONZE

President William McKinley High School (O‘ahu) – “School Spirit” SILVER

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode #803

 

TOP STORY:
Students from H.P. Baldwin High School in Wailuku, Maui tell the story of Karina Bhattacharya, a young artist diagnosed with bi-polar disorder. Bi-polar disorder, also known as manic depression, is a brain disorder that causes unusual shifts in mood, energy, activity levels and the ability to carry out day-to-day tasks. Although her condition has presented Karina with many challenges, she tries to keep a positive outlook. Studies have shown that one silver-lining of bi-polar disorder is its possible link to increased creativity. Karina feels that it has had a positive effect on her painting. “I could see everything the way it was,” says Karina, “and I even started noticing small details. I noticed that my paintings became more vivid. I use new colors…” The ability to express herself through her art has also helped Karina deal with her disorder.

 

ALSO FEATURED:
Students at Maui High School in Kahului tell the story of a young man who restored his religious beliefs by organizing musical events for a faith-based community organization.

 

Students from Pacific Buddhist Academy on O‘ahu demonstrate the steps involved in a traditional Buddhist incense ritual.

 

The journalists from Mililani Middle School in Central O‘ahu highlight the efforts of fellow students who are restoring ancient Hawaiian fishing areas around Mokauea Island in the airport industrial area.

 

Students from Kaua‘i High School in Lihu‘e show us the ins and outs of a bio-mass plant on the Garden Isle.

 

And the students at Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kaua‘i show us how a family that drag races together, stays together.

 

This program encores Saturday, Dec. 3 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Dec. 4 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 



HIKI NŌ
Hawaiian Value: Mālama

 

This episode is the final in a series of six shows in which each episode focuses on a specific Hawaiian value. The Hawaiian value for this show is mālama, which means to care for, protect and maintain.

 

The top story comes from the students at Aliamanu Middle School on Oahu, who report on the efforts of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and its community of volunteers to mālama the Hawaiian Monk Seal.

 

Also featured are student stories from the following schools:

 

Seabury Hall Upper School (Maui): Paul Higashino of the Kahoolawe Island Reserve Commission welcomes and relies on the valuable assistance from volunteers in restoration and re-vegetation efforts on Kahoolawe Island, which for decades was used as a target in military exercises.

 

Kauai High School (Kauai): Students cover five key steps in preparing for a hurricane.

 

Maui High School (Maui): Maui resident Martha Watkins learns valuable lessons from caring for her Alzheimer’s Disease-stricken mother.

 

Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School (Kauai): Residents of Kauai mālama the traditional process practiced by their ancestors for generations of collecting pa’a’kai – sea salt –from a salt pond in Hanapepe.

 

Waianae Intermediate School (Oahu): Students at Waianae Intermediate School mālama students with severe disabilities by acting as peer tutors in their adapted physical education class.

 

Punahou School (Oahu): Punahou Student Dakota Miller, the youngest beekeeper in Hawaii, cares for an apiary to help protect Hawaii’s dwindling bee population.

 

Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle (Maui): A community rebuilds Koieie Loko Ia, an ancient, royal fishpond in Kihei, Maui.

 

This episode is hosted by Hana K-12 School in Hana, Maui.

 

This program encores Saturday, Sept. 10 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Sept. 81 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Top Story: Ka Waihona o ka Naauao Public Charter School, Joseph Kekuku

 

TOP STORY:

 

Students from Ka Waihona o ka Naauao Public Charter School in Nanakuli on Oahu tell the story of Joseph Kekuku, the Native Hawaiian musician from Laie who discovered the Hawaiian Steel Guitar over 100 years ago. Legend has it that Kekuku accidentally dropped his comb on the strings of his guitar one day and liked what he heard. He then developed the sound and technique that became known as Hawaiian steel guitar. When he took that sound abroad it caught on and was one of the reasons why Hawaiian music enjoyed world-wide popularity in the 1920s and 30s. The story includes interviews with Kekuku’s grandson Uncle Joe Ah Quin and grandnieces Aunty Kaiwa Meyer and Aunty Gladys Pualoa-Ahuna.

 

ALSO FEATURED:

 

Students from Kauai High School on the Garden Isle tell the story of a science-trained farmer who turned his love of the science of food into a thriving, family-run food truck.

 

Students from Kapaa Middle School on Kauai show us how to turn old, discarded crayons into colorful abstract art.

 

For a very different approach to art, we tap the HIKI NŌ archives to revisit a story from Iolani School on Oahu about a young conceptual artist/photographer.

 

Students from Kainalu Elementary School in Windward Oahu show us the therapeutic value of miniature horses for special needs children.

 

Students from Saint Francis School on Oahu introduce us to a teacher who is dedicated to bridging the communication gap between the deaf and hearing communities through American Sign Language.

 

This program encores Saturday, June 4 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, June 5 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
All Kauai Schools

 

This is a special, first ever all-Kauai edition of HIKI NŌ, hosted by Island School in Lihue, Kapaa Middle School in Kapaa, Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School in Lihue, Kapaa High School in Kapaa, Kauai High School in Lihue and Waimea High School in Waimea.

 

Top Story:
Students from Island School on Kauai tell the story of Josh Miller, a junior who recovered from a traumatic trail-bike injury to become captain of his cross-country team.

 

Also Featured:
Students at Kapaa Middle School on Kauai profile the island’s youngest and only female fireknife dancer; students at Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kauai share the story of Gail Mande, who overcame her drug addiction and now counsels troubled youth; students from Kapaa High School on Kauai show how a local juice shop is finding fresh ways to support local farmers; students at Kauai High School turn the spotlight on a teen mentor who is motivated by personal tragedy to help others; students at Waimea High School on Kauai share how an alumni foundation is providing vital support to their school; and students at Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kauai speak with the firefighters who rescued more than 100 stranded hikers last April from a popular but treacherous hiking trail.