survive

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
Giving a Damn

 

Many Hawai‘i residents are familiar with the story behind the Micronesian migration. Seventy years ago, two nuclear bombs were dropped on Bikini Atoll, setting off 12 years of detonation in the Marshall Islands. Later, former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger was reported to have referred to the displacement of Micronesians this way: “There are only 90,000 of them out there. Who gives a damn?”

 

Today it’s estimated Micronesians represent about 2% of Hawai‘i’s population. Despite what most people think to be the truth, they are not living off the public dole. They pay taxes and struggle with health, employment, housing – and most of all, assimilation. Many are homeless and would like to return to their island home. But now there’s a new environmental tragedy that threatens the Marshall Islands. Has the migration of Micronesians only just begun? And this time, who will give a damn?

 

For additional reference on this discussion:

 

We Are Oceaniahttp://www.weareoceania.org

 

Compact of Free Association Community Advocacy Networkhttps://www.facebook.com/cofacan

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 



The Talk – Race in America

 

In the wake of recent tragic and fatal events between men of color and law enforcement, learn how black and Hispanic families counsel their kids to stay safe if they are stopped by the police.

 

NATURE
Meet the Coywolf

 

The coywolf, a mixture of western coyote and eastern wolf, is a remarkable new hybrid carnivore that is taking over territories once roamed by wolves and slipping unnoticed into our cities. Its appearance is very recent – within the last 90 years – in evolutionary terms, a blip in time. Beginning in Canada, but by no means ending there, the story of how this new hybrid came to be is an extraordinary tale of how quickly adaptation and evolution can occur, especially when humans interfere.

 

STANDING ON SACRED GROUND
Pilgrims & Tourists

 

In the Russian Republic of Altai, traditional native people create their own mountain parks to rein in tourism and resist a gas pipeline that would cut through a World Heritage Site. In northern California, Winnemem Wintu girls grind herbs on a sacred medicine rock, as elders protest U.S. government plans to enlarge one of the West’s biggest dams and submerge this touchstone of a tribe.

 

FRONTLINE
Children of Syria

 

Follow four children surviving in war-torn Aleppo and their escape to a new life in Germany. The program films the family over three years, from the siege of their city to the kidnapping of their father to the struggle of becoming refugees.

 

NATURE
Snow Monkeys

 

In the frigid valleys of Japan’s Shiga Highlands, a troop of snow monkeys functions in a complex society of rank and privilege where each knows his and her place. Their leader is still new to the job and something of a solitary grouch. One innocent little monkey, unaware of his own low status, reaches out to this lonely leader and they form a rare and remarkable bond that alters both their lives. Changing seasons bring new babies, family disagreements and tragedies. Mating season brings competition for females as the days grow shorter and colder in the rush to winter. With their now confident leader to guide them and their families to shelter and care for them, these snow monkeys are ready to face the world.

 

NATURE
The Sagebrush Sea

 

One of the most overlooked ecosystems on the continent consists of a massive sea of sagebrush that stretches across 11 states in the American West. This spartan yet spectacular landscape supports more than 170 species of hardscrabble birds and mammals. Among those that have adapted to survive here are birds found nowhere else: greater sage-grouse that lead remarkable lives mostly hidden in the sage. But once each year, males emerge for days on end to strut and display as prospective mates for discriminating females, which mate with only one or two of them. Females must then raise their chicks on their own, with little food, water or shelter to sustain them, while plenty of predators wait for their smallest mistake. Today, they must also contend with wells and pipelines tapping the resources buried deep below. The sagebrush and the grouse carry on, but they’re losing ground.

 

NATURE
Siberian Tiger Quest

 

Ecologist Chris Morgan has tracked large predators in some of the wildest and most remote places on earth. He now embarks on a challenge that will fulfill a lifelong dream – to find and film a Siberian tiger living wild and free in Russia’s far eastern forests. The film features the work of Korean cameraman Sooyong Park, the first individual ever to film Siberian tigers in the wild. Park spent years in the forest tracking and filming the world’s biggest cat.

 

INDEPENDENT LENS
The Great Invisible

 

On April 20, 2010, a disastrous explosion took place on the Deepwater Horizon offshore oil-drilling rig in the Gulf of Mexico. After two days ablaze, the Deepwater Horizon sank, causing the largest offshore oil spill in American history. The spill flowed unabated for almost three months, dumping hundreds of millions of gallons of oil in the ocean, shutting down the local fishing industry, polluting the fragile ecosystem, and raising serious questions about the safety of continued offshore drilling.

 

Eyewitnesses provide first-hand accounts of the tragedy from the moment of the explosion to its still unfolding repercussions. The film brings a new and unique perspective to the ongoing tension between the haves and the have-nots, exploring the crisis through the eyes of oil industry executives, survivors, and local residents who are left to pick up the pieces while the world moves on.

 

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