U.S.

PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS
Hidden Legacy: Japanese Traditional Performing Arts in the WWII Internment Camps

 

Using historical footage and interviews from artists who were interned, this film tells the story of how traditional Japanese cultural arts were maintained at a time when the War Relocation Authority emphasized the importance of assimilation and Americanization. Included are stories of artists in the fields of music, dance and drama who were interned at Tule Lake, Manzanar, Amache/Granada, Rohwer, Gila River and Topaz.

 

ASK THIS OLD HOUSE
Hawai‘i Makes 50

 

That makes 50! A visit to O‘ahu completes the show’s run of every U.S. state. Tom learns how to create a unique keepsake box from island materials in Build It. Richard looks at a new way to store solar energy. Roger helps a Wai‘anae family grow an organic garden with the help of MA‘O Organic Farms.

 

PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS
Under a Jarvis Moon

 

This film tells the story of 130 young men from Hawaii who, from the late 1930s through the early years of World War II, were part of a clandestine mission by the U.S. federal government to occupy desert islands in the middle of the Pacific. The first wave of these colonists was a group of Hawaiian high school students, chosen because government officials assumed Pacific Islanders could best survive the harsh conditions present on the tiny, isolated islands. For the young men, who were unaware of the true purpose of their role as colonists, what ensued is a tale of intrigue, courage, and ultimately, tragedy.

 

INDEPENDENT LENS
National Bird

 

In this excerpt from the Independent Lens film National Bird, Heather, a former U.S. military drone pilot who is now a masseuse, talks about the emotional distress caused by knowing she was responsible for the deaths of people, something she tried to push out of her mind but found impossible to shake. “You see someone die, because you said it was okay to kill them,” she says.

 

ROADTRIP NATION
Beyond the Dream

 

This edition follows three 20-something immigrants who were each brought to the U.S. at a young age by their parents. They all have temporary relief from deportation, but not legal status. An immigration policy called DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) has allowed them to live and work in the U.S. for a two-year period. But without long-term protections, they have a much graver question to ponder: “Will I be able to stay in this country?”

 

NATURE
Yosemite

 

Yosemite Valley is a land forged in wildfire and sculpted by water, and the delicate balance of these two elements is essential to the creatures and trees that call this land their home. But with climates changing and temperatures rising, the Sierras are under siege. Water is scarcer and the threat of fire is more common. Join scientists and adventurers as they trudge through mountains of snow, climb trees as tall as buildings and soar high in the air to spy just how these global changes are affecting one of America’s greatest wildernesses.

 

FRONTLINE
Iraq Uncovered

 

FRONTLINE reports on what is happening on the ground in Iraq in areas where ISIS has been pushed out. Correspondent Ramita Navai makes a dangerous and revealing journey inside the war-torn country, investigating allegations of abuse of Sunni Muslim civilians by powerful Shia militias.

 

FRONTLINE
Out of Gitmo

 

Produced in collaboration with NPR, FRONTLINE presents the dramatic story of a Gitmo detainee released from the controversial U.S. prison after 14 years, and the struggle over freeing prisoners once deemed international terrorists. Also in this hour, FRONTLINE works with Retro Report to explore the untold history of the Guantanamo Bay prison.

 

The Draft

 

The draft in the 1960s and 1970s was a lightning rod that lit up schisms of race, class and culture in American society. But ending the draft has produced unintended consequences, creating a citizenry disconnected from that of the soldiers who experience the burden of war. The question of who serves in America’s military has shaped battle strategy and foreign policy and stranded Americans in uniform for years on distant battlefields. From the Civil War to the conflicts of the Vietnam era, forced military service has torn the nation apart – and sometimes, as in WWII, united Americans in a common purpose. Featuring interviews with the people who fought the draft, supported it and lived its realities, this program tells the story of how a single, controversial issue continues to define a nation.

 

The 2016 National Memorial Day Concert

 

Join co-hosts Gary Sinise and Joe Mantegna for the 27th broadcast of this night of remembrance honoring the service and sacrifice of our men and women in uniform, their families at home and all those who have given their lives for our country.

 

The all-star line-up includes: General Colin L. Powell, USA (Ret.); opera superstar Renée Fleming; iconic music legends The Beach Boys; country music singer Trace Adkins; actress S. Epatha Merkerson, actor Esai Morales and vocalist Alfie Boe, and the National Symphony Orchestra under the direction of top pops conductor Jack Everly.

 

This program will encore at 8:30 pm

 

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