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One of the many things that drew me to public broadcasting was its commitment to universal access to education. In a time of increasing income disparity, this tenet is more timely than ever.  Long before COVID-19 shut  down schools, PBS Hawai‘i has routinely served rural and other under-resourced communities that lack digital access (Wi-Fi).
Do you remember the words of the signature song of Dory the fish in the animated movie Finding Nemo? “Just keep swimming … Just keep swimming.” A children’s song that wasn’t childish, it was about gaining and growing one’s focus, keeping the faith and pressing on.
  You may notice that this monthly program guide is skinnier than it was last month, as if it went on a crash diet. There was indeed a crash of sorts, one that all of us are dealing with in one way or another: the economic fall-out from COVID-19.
We’re all still absorbing the many ways that life has changed since COVID-19 broke into our vocabulary as a double-whammy threat to personal health and the economy. Here’s just one way: The fast-changing seating configurations on our live editions of INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I.
It‘s time for a new three-year strategic plan for this 55-year-old nonprofit organization serving our beloved, troubled state.
PBS National President and CEO Paula Kerger arrived from Washington DC on a windy, drizzly afternoon, and she departed days later, with word of the passing of retired PBS NewsHour anchor Jim Lehrer.
Over the course of 13 years as CEO of PBS Hawaiʻi, I’ve had ample opportunity to experience something very delightful about our viewers: Many of them are every bit as compelling in communicating as our professional storytellers. Good storytellers know their audience. They know how to connect with emotion and imagination.
I sometimes feel like Forrest Gump when I open my office mail. It’s like a box of chocolates. You never know what you’re going to get.
Live television is known for surprises – and we certainly experienced stunning moments during the very first of our What’s it Going to Take? forums.
Patricia de Stacy Harrison loved growing up in her working-class, family-centered neighborhood in Brooklyn – it was loud and caring, engaged and opinionated. “You would talk,” she told me in her visit to Honolulu last month. “And then you would wait for your next turn to talk.
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