INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI
COVID-19 in Hawaiʻi 4|9|20

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI: COVID-19 in Hawaiʻi

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI has ongoing coverage of COVID-19 in Hawaiʻi. Every week, INSIGHTS is assembling guests in key areas to help viewers understand the effects of this spreading new coronavirus. How prepared is Hawaiʻi’s health-care system for the rising number of cases in the Islands? Are there enough hospital beds, ventilators and protective equipment? How do we cope with the stress this crisis has created? Where do thousands of unemployed workers find resources to pay rent, utilities and other bills that are due? Join the continuing conversation. You can phone in or leave us a comment on Facebook or Twitter.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

 

 


NĀ MELE: TRADITIONS IN HAWAIIAN SONG
Weldon Kekauoha

Story by Emilie Howlett

 

 

Hawaiian musician Weldon Kekauoha has been crafting beloved musical arrangements and sharing them with Hawaiʻi, the continental U.S. and beyond for over 30 years. He’s enjoyed a successful solo career, amassing multiple Nā Hōkū Hanohano awards and, in 2014, a Grammy nomination. For the past 15 years, he has been going to Japan to perform, finding an enthusiastic audience there that has embraced the Hawaiian culture.

 

Web exclusive:

 

 

Kekauoha gave a soulful performance in PBS Hawaiʻi’s Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Multimedia Studio, for the taping of our newest Nā Mele. In this episode of our traditional Hawaiian music series, guitarist Jack Ofoia, bassist Alika Boy Kalauli IV and hula dancer Yuko Hashimoto accompany Kekauoha with a performance set against dramatic photo backdrops of Hawai‘i landscapes.

 

Identifying himself as a contemporary artist with a traditional foundation, Kekauoha goes in-depth about the meaning behind his songs, his experience as a longtime performer and the importance of music in his life.

 

He also addresses an incident at the Halekulani Hotel in 2013. While enjoying the pool during a weekend getaway at the Waikīkī hotel, Kekauoha and his family were asked by security guards to verify that they were guests. The guards were acting on another hotel guest’s suspicion that the Kekauohas did not belong at the pool because they were locals.

 

Kekauoha vented about the incident on Facebook. The post went viral, sparking widespread outrage. The hotel apologized, but for Kekauoha to be a target of discrimination in the same neighborhood where he and many other Hawaiian musicians made a name for themselves was a bitter irony for him.

 

Today, Kekauoha says he doesn’t harbor any ill feelings toward the hotel. “Hopefully it brought a little bit more of an awareness,” he says. “Racism can rear its head often, and we’ve got to always be vigilant to try and keep it in its place.” Thankfully, as Kekauoha knows intimately from his world travels, nothing breaks down barriers of difference better than the art of sharing music.

 

In these excerpts from an interview with Kekauoha and Jason Suapaia, PBS Hawaiʻi’s former Vice President of Integrated Media Production, Kekauoha highlights the many ways music has touched his life.

 

 

PBS Hawaiʻi: How important is music in perpetuating the Hawaiian culture?

Weldon Kekauoha: Very, very important. People say hula has been able to sustain that part of the culture, and from there, so much of the [Hawaiian] Renaissance has been able to flourish. More interest has grown because of hula, and music has always been there in the background.

 

I think music is a little bit of a different animal, only because it’s so open for creativity and influence. If you look at so much of the history of Hawaiian music – in Hawai‘i, on the U.S. mainland, even abroad – it’s incredible to see how much the music has changed from being super traditional, and then going way out from it, to being commercialized.  And I mean that in a good way. There’s of course some negative aspects to it, and then “Hollywood-ized,” if you will. Then it took a long while to bring it back [to the traditional], because it just got so way out from the original intent of our culture. But it’s neat to see the revival of all that is Hawaiian, and the new pride that has been fostered from it. I’m looking forward to seeing what happens in the next 20 years.

 

Kekauoha, left, performs on Nā Mele with bassist Alika Boy Kalauli IV and hula dancer Yuko Hashimoto. Photo: Richard Drake

 

How has music touched your life, and your family’s life, and what would it be without music?

I can’t imagine how it would be without music. It’s always been there, it’s always been in the background for me at some level. And obviously, now, where I am, it’s what I do and it’s what I’m known for. I feel blessed that I get to do what I love to do. Oftentimes, people are looking for something to do that they enjoy, and I think if it wasn’t for music, I would probably embrace whatever it is that I was doing, and that would become perhaps my passion and I’d make it work. That’s your job. If you’re not happy, you gotta change.  But if you get to know your job well, and you love it, it’s a different type of enjoyment.  In this case, it’s always been something I’ve enjoyed since I was a young boy. To be able to carry it over into sustaining me, my family and my life all this time, I’ve been lucky.   And it’s still a work in progress. It’s like any other business; you gotta kind of take care of it, and try to make sure you have something good to sell, something good to give people. And you just continue with good relationships and good performances, and all that that entails. Having a good business is pretty much what you should shoot for.

 

When people listen to your music, what do you hope they will get from it?

I just hope that they would like my music, for whatever reason – whether it strikes a chord in them, or reminds them of something. Even I am totally susceptible; I can listen to a song and it just takes me back somewhere. And that’s the power of music. I always remember how strong music can be. I just hope [listeners] take away something. I don’t expect one song to be like a huge, life-changing moment for anybody, but if I can have a place in someone’s heart or mind because of my music, I think that would be my goal. I want them to take away something from my music that they will always remember, whether it’s a feeling or the melody.

 

This interview has been edited for clarity and length.

 

 

 



HIKI NŌ 2|13|20: A Son’s Love and Other Stories | Program

 

TOP STORY

 

“A Sonʻs Love”
Students from Maui High School in Kahului, Maui, tell the story of a single mother who hits rock bottom after suffering from a series of emotional and physical ailments. Through the love and support of her son, she eventually learns how to enjoy her new life and look to the future.

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

“Lucky Bees”
Students from Maui Waena Intermediate School on the Valley Isle tell the story of a passionate Kīhei beekeeper who aims to protect the island’s native bee population from dangers afflicting bee colonies around the world.

 

“Okinawan Connection”
Students from Kalāheo High School from the Kailua district of Oʻahu tell the story of Hawaiʻi Okinawans who sent 550 pigs to revitalize pig farming and bring normalcy to an Okinawa devastated by World War II.

 

“How to De-Stress”
Students from Hilo Intermediate School on the Big Island show us three tips on how to “put stress to rest” in our ever-busy world.

 

“Heart of Gold”
Students from Moanalua High School on the island of Oʻahu tell the story of a bubbly woman who believes in living every day to its fullest while working hard to take care of her Alzheimer’s-afflicted mother.

 

Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School host this episode of HIKI NŌ from their campus in Pukalani, Maui.

 

 

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI
What’s it Going to Take? – Does Hawaiʻi Have the Will and the Resiliency to Build a Better Future?

 

PBS Hawaiʻi continues to ask What’s It Going to Take?, in an ongoing series of live televised forums seeking to galvanize decision-makers, communities and all of us to make life in Hawaiʻi better. Does Hawaiʻi Have the Will and the Resiliency to Build a Better Future? That’s the subject of our next special edition of INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI. The numbers are daunting, even scary. Nearly 50% of Hawaiʻi residents barely get by; 62% of all jobs in in the state pay less than $20 per hour; and the crisis in affordable housing drives many people to leave Hawaiʻi for the Continent. But others stay, and some return, drawn by family, culture and the aloha spirit. Join the discussion by phoning in or leaving us a comment on Facebook or Twitter. INSIGHTS is also streamed live on pbshawaii.org and PBS Hawaiʻi’s Facebook page.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

 

 

KĀKOU – Hawai‘i’s Town Hall
The Future of Work

Program

 

Will you be employable? Will your children?

Conversations about the future and the kind of world our children and their children will inherit from us include familiar concerns and well-defined subjects: The National Debt. Environmental Destruction. Climate Change. Sustainability. But there’s another conversation that needs to happen. Although the workplace has changed throughout the decades, none of us can fully grasp the kind of transformational change that lies ahead. How we work. Where we work. And the skills we need for work will change work – as we know it today – forever.

 
Preview opening clip: Growth Tribe

 

The FUTURE OF WORK is the topic for the next live KĀKOU – Hawai‘i’s Town Hall – Thursday, October 25 from 8:00 – 10:00 pm. Representatives from government, labor and the education and business communities will be joined by workers, parents and students for a community conversation about what is referred to as the Fourth Industrial Revolution and the impact it is creating on local economies and employment landscapes – including Hawai‘i’s. Are we preparing our children for a future where disruptive technology will transform the workplace and much of the way we live?

 

What will life in Hawai‘i be like 10, 20 and 30 years from now when technology is firmly embedded and in most cases dominating the workplace? Could this be a positive opportunity to diversify Hawai‘i’s economy and job landscape? How do we prepare future generations for WORK 4.0?

 

 


<< Return to the KĀKOU home page.

 

 

Aloha Oe,
Leahey & Leahey

Leahey & Leahey: Father: Jim, Son: Kanoa
After nine years on PBS Hawaii, the father-and-son sports talk show Leahey & Leahey has come to an end.

 

At their in-studio kitchen table, Jim and Kanoa Leahey welcomed sports heroes, insiders and policy makers from Hawaii and around the world.

 

“It’s been a wonderful run at PBS Hawaii, but it is time to move on,” Kanoa Leahey said. “I couldn’t ever fully express my appreciation for the support we received from PBS Hawaii management, as well as the viewers the last nine years. I will thoroughly miss working with the crew and staff.”

 

“PBS Hawaii gave us the shot to do something unique,” Jim Leahey said. “It served as a perfect platform of expression and thought. We thank Leslie Wilcox and the rest of the PBS Hawaii staff for affording us the opportunity to engage in what we referred to as a generationally challenged discussion of sports and other living things. But as with all living things, change and transition are inevitable. Mahalo to all who made the last nine years so special for us.”

 

“Nine years is remarkable staying power in weekly television, and we congratulate Jim and Kanoa on the show’s originality, authenticity and success,” said PBS Hawaii President and CEO Leslie Wilcox. “We understand and support Kanoa’s need for more flexibility in his career horizons with ESPN. Much aloha to both Leaheys in their future endeavors.”

 

Leahey & Leahey premiered on PBS Hawaii in July 2006. Past episodes can be viewed for a limited time, here on our site.

 

INFORMATION ON COVID-19

INFORMATION ON THE COVID-19

 

PBS Hawaiʻi Programs

 

Air Date: Thursday, April 2, 2020, 8:00pm

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI: COVID-19 in Hawaiʻi

With the Islands’ #1 goal to slow the spread of the deadly novel coronavirus, INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI continues our coverage of COVID-19 in Hawaiʻi. Residents of the state have mostly settled into a stay-home “lockdown,” and visitor traffic is mostly kapu. How long does an infected person stay contagious? Is Hawaiʻi’s supply line for food and other products secure? How are we protecting elders? Join INSIGHTS’ statewide COVID-19 conversation.

 

Air Date: Thursday, March 19, 2020, 8:00 pm

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI: COVID-19: STAY ALERT, STAY INFORMED, STAY HEALTHY

It has been less than three months since reports of the coronavirus outbreak in Wuhan, China first made international headlines. With worldwide cases growing significantly every day, the World Health Organization has declared COVID-19 a global pandemic. What are we doing as a community to inform and protect Hawaiʻi’s people? We know that testing has been woefully inadequate, but are there other important things that we should be doing that we’re not? Find out, on INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI as we discuss COVID-19: Stay Alert, Stay Informed, Stay Healthy.

 

Air Date: Thursday, March 19, 2020, 9:00 pm

CONFRONTING CORONAVIRUS: A PBS NEWSHOUR SPECIAL

Confronting Coronavirus: A PBS NewsHour Special will focus on health precautions for individuals and the public-at-large as well as the pandemic’s economic impact both in the United States and globally. This special, anchored by NewsHour managing editor Judy Woodruff, will include interviews with officials and a virtual town hall with curated questions from people across America.

You can view online at:

https://www.pbs.org/newshour/health/watch-live-confronting-coronavirus-a-pbs-newshour-special

 

Coronavirus Resources

 

Below please find access to Coronavirus resources from PBS Hawaiʻi and our affiliates. Together, in partnership with our community-at-large, we will continue to serve you with information during these unsettling times.

 

Latest Reporting on the Coronavirus

https://www.pbs.org/newshour/tag/novel-coronavirus

 

What You Should Know

https://digital.pbs.org/products/bento/what-you-should-know-about-the-novel-coronavirus/

 

How to Talk To your Children About Coronavirus

https://www.pbs.org/parents/thrive/how-to-talk-to-your-kids-about-coronavirus

 

How to Wear and Make Your own Mask

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prevent-getting-sick/diy-cloth-face-coverings.html

 

Latest Local News

 

Honolulu City and County
http://www.honolulu.gov/mayor/proclamations-orders-and-rules.html

https://www.oneoahu.org/faqs

Maui County
https://www.mauicounty.gov/

Kauai County
http://www.kauai.gov/COVID-19

Hawai‘i County
https://coronavirus-response-county-of-hawaii-hawaiicountygis.hub.arcgis.com/

Hawaiʻi Department of Health
https://health.hawaii.gov/docd/advisories/novel-coronavirus-2019/

Interisland Travel Quarantine Order
https://hidot.hawaii.gov/blog/2020/04/01/governor-ige-issues-emergency-order-requiring-self-quarantine-for-interisland-travelers/

 

Latest National News

 

National Institutes of Health
https://www.nih.gov/health-information/coronavirus

CDC: Center for Disease Control and Prevention
https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html

World Health Organization
https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019

 

Resources for Families

 

The State of Hawaiʻi Executive Office on Early Learning
https://earlylearning.hawaii.gov/covid19/

 

 

 

Download Our Program Guide

PBS HAWAI‘I: Home is Here

The April 2020 Program Guide

PBS Hawaiʻi Presents: Reel Wāhine of Hawaiʻi
The PBS Hawaiʻi April 2020 Program GuideDownload the The PBS Hawaiʻi April 2020 Program Guide (PDF).

Download the April Primetime Schedule (PDF).

The March 2020 Program Guide

Dave Shoji on Long Story Short with Leslie Wilcox
The PBS Hawaiʻi March 2020 Program GuideDownload the The PBS Hawaiʻi March 2020 Program Guide (PDF).

Download the March Primetime Schedule (PDF).




 

 

 

PBS Hawaiʻi Passport


PBS HAWAI‘I PASSPORT

 

Introducing a new benefit to PBS Hawai‘i supporters that provides extended on-demand access to quality PBS programming.

 

Quality shows. On your schedule.

PBS Hawai‘i Passport is an added benefit for valued donors of public television.

 

With PBS Hawai‘i Passport, you can enjoy past episodes of many of your favorite PBS and PBS Hawai‘i shows on demand using your computer, smartphone or tablet. More platforms and devices are coming soon!

 

What’s it Going to Take?
Forums on Making Life Better in Hawaiʻi

What's it Going to Take? Forums on making life better in Hawaiʻi

FAMILY INGREDIENTS
Puerto Rico – Arroz con Gandules

 

Part foodie, part travelogue, part genealogy, Family Ingredients follows acclaimed Hawai‘i restaurateur and sustainability hero Ed Kenney, as he meets with different individuals in the Islands, and follows each person’s cherished food memory to its origin around the globe. He takes off to explore Okinawa, Tahiti, California, Japan, Puerto Rico and the Hawaiian Islands, showcasing how cuisine can profoundly unite cultures, communities and families.

 

Puerto Rico – Arroz con Gandules
Puerto Rican pride thrives in Hawaiʻi. Ed Kenney meets up with entertainer Tiara Hernandez, whose family grew up in Waikiki showrooms. They follow a culinary path to a country she’s never seen to learn more about her heritage.