America

Forgotten Ellis Island

 

Visit the abandoned immigrant hospital on Ellis Island. During the great wave of immigration, 22 medical buildings sprawled across two islands adjacent to Ellis Island, the largest port of entry to the United States.

 

AMERICAN EXPERIENCE
The Great War, Part 1 of 3

 

In conjunction with the 100th anniversary of America’s entry into the war on April 6, 1917, this three-part, six-hour documentary tells the rich and complex story of World War I through the voices of nurses, journalists, aviators and the American troops who came to be known as “doughboys.” The series explores the experiences of African American and Latino soldiers, suffragists, Native American code talkers and others whose participation in the war to “make the world safe for democracy” has been largely forgotten.

 

Part 1 of 3
Explore America’s tortured, nearly three-year journey to war. Reports of German atrocities and submarine attacks on American ships erode neutrality, finally leading to President Woodrow Wilson’s proclamation that “the world must be made safe for democracy.”

 

AMERICAN EXPERIENCE
The Great War, Part 2 of 3

 

In conjunction with the 100th anniversary of America’s entry into the war on April 6, 1917, this three-part, six-hour documentary tells the rich and complex story of World War I through the voices of nurses, journalists, aviators and the American troops who came to be known as “doughboys.” The series explores the experiences of African American and Latino soldiers, suffragists, Native American code talkers and others whose participation in the war to “make the world safe for democracy” has been largely forgotten.

 

Part 2 of 3
Follow America’s entry into the war as patriotism sweeps the nation, stifling free speech and dissent. A diverse group of men becomes the country’s first mass-conscripted army, while women continue to demand the vote.

 

AMERICAN EXPERIENCE
The Great War, Part 3 of 3

 

In conjunction with the 100th anniversary of America’s entry into the war on April 6, 1917, this three-part, six-hour documentary tells the rich and complex story of World War I through the voices of nurses, journalists, aviators and the American troops who came to be known as “doughboys.” The series explores the experiences of African American and Latino soldiers, suffragists, Native American code talkers and others whose participation in the war to “make the world safe for democracy” has been largely forgotten.

 

Part 3 of 3
Discover how the violent and bloody conflict transformed the nation forever, as America steps onto the world stage for the first time. But while many heralded the peace, others worried about democracy at home.

 

Red Rock Serenade

Red Rock Serenade

 

Take a meditative, cinematic journey through the breathtaking scenery of the American West’s iconic red rock country, including Arches, Bryce Canyon, Zion, Canyonlands, Capitol Reef and Grand Canyon National Parks – all set to music by some of the world’s greatest classical composers, including Bach, Brahms, Chopin and Beethoven.

 

 

JFK & LBJ: A Time for Greatness

 

For many, President Lyndon Baines Johnson is chiefly remembered for escalating the United States military involvement in Vietnam. But 50 years ago, he engineered two of the most important laws Congress ever passed, the 1964 Civil Rights Act and the 1965 Voting Rights Act. This special examines how LBJ transformed America.

 

GLOBE TREKKER
West Texas

 

Trekker Zay Harding starts his journey in Austin, where he experiences everything from rattlesnake hotdogs to bingo with chickens. He then heads south to San Antonio for a visit to the Alamo. Following a night in the most haunted hotel in Texas, Zay travels to the border city of El Paso. After meeting the locals, he treks into the surrounding desert to travel along the old Butterfield trail. Traveling in a 1960s Mustang, Zay embarks on a road trip along Route 66 where he takes in the stunning Palo Duro Canyon, competes in Amarillo’s steak-eating challenge and concludes his trip in Glenrio, the mysterious ghost town that borders New Mexico.

 

AMERICAN EXPERIENCE
Death and the Civil War

 

Drawing heavily on historian and Harvard president Drew Gilpin Faust’s acclaimed book This Republic of Suffering, this film explores a critical but largely overlooked aspect of the Civil War experience: the immense and varied implications of the war’s staggering and unprecedented death toll. The war created a veritable “republic of suffering,” as landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted described the wounded and dying arriving at Union hospital ships on the Virginia Peninsula. The shattering Civil War death toll transformed hundreds of thousands of individual lives and the life of the nation as well. From its understanding of the rights and responsibilities of citizenship to the profound struggle of a deeply religious culture, America struggled to reconcile these events with a belief in a benevolent God.

 

AMERICAN EXPERIENCE
Blackout


 

Encore

 

Look back at what happened in New York City the night the lights went out in summer 1977, plunging seven million people into darkness. By the time the power was fully restored more than a day later, more than 1,600 businesses had been looted, over 3,700 people had been arrested, and firefighters had battled more than 1,000 fires. See how this event led to both lawlessness and acts of selflessness and generosity.

 

DEBT OF HONOR:
Disabled Veterans in American History

 

Take an unflinching look at the reality of warfare and disability in this history of disabled veterans, featuring moving interviews with some of our country’s prominent disabled veterans, including Representative Tammy Duckworth, former Georgia Senator Max Cleland and former Commander of Fort Belvoir, Gregory Gadson.

 

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