Arts

PBS HAWAIʻI PRESENTS
Keola Beamer: Mālama Ko Aloha (Keep Your Love)

PBS HAWAII PRESENTS: Keola Beamer: Mālama Ko Aloha (Keep Your Love)

 

This program tells the story of Keola Beamer’s journey through song. The respected composer and slack key guitarist partners with an array of musicians, including Native American flutist R. Carlos Nakai, American jazz pianist Geoffrey Keezer and Hawaiian vocalist Raiatea Helm. These collaborations demonstrate how one can retain cultural identity while openly sharing with others to create something new – a global art form. This multicultural exchange reaches its zenith when Beamer performs a Hawaiian-language version of John Lennon’s “Imagine,” with musicians playing traditional Hawaiian, Chinese, Japanese, Australian, Classical European and American Jazz instruments. In another particularly moving segment, Keola accompanies his wife Moanalani Beamer as she performs a hula as a quadriplegic woman who magically regains use of her limbs in a dream.

 

 

 

FAKE OR FORTUNE?
Toulouse-Lautrec

FAKE OR FORTUNE? Toulouse-Lautrec

 

The team investigates four sketchbooks which may be the work of the young French master. Alain Brun is a French psychoanalyst who lives in Bordeaux. He was given the sketchbooks by his grandmother in the 1960s and she always maintained they were the work of Toulouse Lautrec. Alain sent them to the Lautrec committee to see if they could be authenticated. They came back saying that it was actually the work of Lautrec’s tutor, Princeteau. However, Princeteau experts have disputed this – saying they are far too good. The team searches for evidence to see if they can irrefutably link these sketches to the young Lautrec and change the committee’s mind.

 

 

 

The Chaperone on Masterpiece

 

Louise Brooks, the 1920s silver screen sensation who never met a rule she didn’t break, epitomized the restless, reckless spirit of the Jazz Age. But, just a few years earlier, she was a 15 year-old student in Wichita, Kansas for whom fame and fortune were only dreams. When the opportunity arises for her to go to New York to study with a leading dance troupe, her mother (Victoria Hill) insists there be a chaperone. Norma Carlisle (Elizabeth McGovern, Downton Abbey), a local society matron who never broke a rule in her life, impulsively volunteers to accompany Louise (Haley Lu Richardson) to New York for the summer.

 

 

 

SKINDIGENOUS
Philippines – Whang Od Oggay and Grace Palica

 

From a remote mountain village in the Northern Philippines, Wang Od Oggay carries on the tattooing tradition of her ancestors, offering those who come to her the sacred markings that were once reserved for the women and warriors of the Kalinga people.

 

 

 

 

ART IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY
San Francisco Bay Area

ART IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY: San Francisco Bay Area

 

See why the San Francisco Bay Area is a magnet for artists who are drawn to its experimental atmosphere, countercultural spirit and history of innovation, and who are united by their steadfastness and persistence in creating. Featuring Katy Grannan, Lynn Hershman Leeson, Stephanie Syjuco and the artists from Creative Growth Art Center.

 

 

 

ART IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY
Berlin

 

Olafur Eliasson considers the impact of art beyond the object in this preview of the upcoming Berlin episode from Season 9 of the Art in the Twenty-First Century television series. Featured artists include Nathalie Djurberg & Hans Berg, Hiwa K and Susan Philipsz.

 

 

 

ART IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY
Johannesburg

 

David Goldblatt investigates South African sociocultural influences on architecture in this preview of the upcoming “Johannesburg” episode from Season 9 of the “Art in the Twenty-First Century” television series. Featured artists include David Goldblatt, Nicholas Hlobo, Zanele Muholi and Robin Rhode.

 

 

 

NĀ MELE: TRADITIONS IN HAWAIIAN SONG
Hūʻewa

 

When you hear their name, you can’t help but smile. The young trio Hūʻewa is comprised of Kupu Dalire-Naʻauao, Kekoa Kane and Kahi Lum-Young.

 

“‘Hū’ is to hum or to make sound, to make music. And ʻewa’ is to go off course or to find your own path,” explained Hūʻewa member Kane. “…that’s what we do with our music…we make music on our own path, on a different style.”

 

The trio performs songs including “Kaulana Niʻihau,” where they’re accompanied by the dancers of Hālau Ka Liko Pua O Kalaniakea; and a medley consisting of favorite songs of each member: “Kaulana Molokaʻi,” “Pauoa Liko Ka Lehua” and “Meleana Ē.” Dalire-Naʻauao explains, “The Hawaiian music that we chose, the type of songs that we chose…we just like to pull things from back in the day.”

 

 

 

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