Cuisine

LIDIA’S KITCHEN
Spice it Up

 

Spices impart a lot of flavor to a recipe, and today Lidia shows viewers how to use different spices. First on the menu is mussels with fennel and saffron, an elegant and luxurious way to serve mussels. Lidia loves peperoncino in almost any dish, especially when making spicy stuffed clams. And finally, Lidia makes chicken and zucchini salad with horseradish dressing.

 

 

 

DINING WITH THE CHEF
Artisan Edition in Akita: Koji

DINING WITH THE CHEF: Artisan Edition in Akita: Koji

 

Discover the basics of Japanese cuisine with professionals. Chef Saito provides easy guidance for making authentic dishes, while Chef Rika gives helpful advice on quick and stylish cuisine.

 

Artisan Edition in Akita: Koji

We’re visiting the far northern prefecture of Akita and learning about Akita’s cooking over two episodes. In this second episode, we’ll learn about koji, used to make indispensable Japanese ingredients like miso, soy sauce, sake, or mirin. The town of Yokote, Akita is famous nationwide for its rice, and the town’s food culture features many fermented items based on the use of this exceptional rice has been used to make koji since long ago. By mixing koji and salt, we can make the all-purpose condiment shio-koji that has been sweeping Japan in the past few years. We’ll learn a simple recipe to make shio-koji, and see ways to use it to make Japanese dishes even more delicious. This week, we hope to introduce the world to the mysterious and wonderful powers of koji!

 

 

 

DINING WITH THE CHEF
Artisan Edition in Akita: Kiritampo-Nabe (Rice Stick Hot Pot)

DINING WITH THE CHEF - Artisan Edition in Akita: Kiritampo-Nabe (Rice Stick Hot Pot)

 

We’ll be visiting the far northern prefecture of Akita and learning about Akita’s local cooking over two episodes. In the first episode, we’ll learn about Kiritampo-nabe, a hotpot dish once cooked by the Matagi, hunters who lived in the mountains. This hotpot contains local Hinai chicken, seri, maitake mushrooms, burdock root, and kiritampo, the item that gives the dish its name. Made by mashing rice, then spreading it on a stick and grilling it, kiritampo are perfect for soaking up the rich flavor of the Hinai chicken soup. We’ll also learn about Akita’s unique food culture, full of the flavors of nature.

 

 

 

LUCKY CHOW
Filipino Entrepreneurs

 

This series travels across the United States to explore Asian cuisine’s impact on American food culture. Hosted by Danielle Chang, the six-part series explores a wide variety of Asian food and drink and meets the new generation of chefs and entrepreneurs dedicated to keeping traditions alive. The series features renowned chefs and culinary personalities such as Top Chef winner Kristen Kish, YouTube sensation Maangchi, Chinese master chef Susur Lee and ramen entrepreneur Ivan Orkin.

 

Filipino Entrepreneurs
Filipinos comprise the second-largest Asian American population nationwide, yet their cuisine is relatively unknown. PJ Quesada, founder of the Filipino Food Movement, explains Filipino cuisine while feasting at his friend Tim Luym’s restaurant in San Mateo, CA. Then we meet restaurateur Nicole Ponseca, who left her life as an advertising executive in New York to give voice to her culture through food. Finally, the two friends behind Bling Bling Dumplings manufacture thousands of dumplings – from scratch, at home – to serve at festivals.

 

 

 

 

LUCKY CHOW
Northern Thai Cuisine

 

Andy Ricker, a carpenter-turned-chef from Portland, OR, prepares a welcome dinner for the participating chefs at LA’s Lotus of Siam restaurant, with chef/owner Saipin Chutima at the helm. The duo create their collective version of a spicy Issan dish. At the table, Jet Tila rhapsodizes about the days when his family opened America’s first Thai grocery store in Hollywood and introduced lemongrass, kaffir lime leaves and other ingredients to the American palate.

 

 

 

LUCKY CHOW
Koreatown U.S.A.

 

This episode visits New York and Los Angeles – home to the two largest Korean populations in the United States – to explore what distinguishes each. Both are 24-hour hubs of food and drinking culture. However, New York City’s Koreatown covers just one block, whereas Los Angeles’ Koreatown seems like a city unto itself. At dinner with host Lisa Ling and her husband Paul Song, Chef Sang Yoon breaks down the basics of Korean cooking. Back in New York, Top Chef winner Kristen Kish, a Seoul-born Korean adoptee, receives a kimchi tutorial from Korean YouTube sensation, Maangchi. The episode ends with a night out at Pocha 32, an export of Korea’s popular “tent” restaurants.

 

 

 

LUCKY CHOW
Ramen Mania

 

Ivan Orkin, a New Yorker-turned-Japanese-ramen-chef, discusses ramen culture in New York versus Tokyo. Chef Nakamura from Sun Noodles explains what makes a great bowl of ramen. Later, seafood purveyor-turned-ramen-chef Yuji Haraguchi creates a New York deli-style version of his broth-less ramen dish, mazemen.

 

 

 

RUDY MAXA’S WORLD
Hong Kong, Part 1 of 2

RUDY MAXA’S WORLD: Hong Kong, Part 1

 

A bastion of capitalism under the umbrella of China, a city with a stunning array of architecturally interesting skyscrapers, and a city where shopping and dining are varsity sports, Hong Kong certainly ranks as one of the world’s great cities. Host Rudy Maxa and Washington, D.C. restaurateur and chef Daisuke Utagawa enthusiastically eat their way through Hong Kong, from cheap but authentic, hole-in-the-wall Chinese restaurants to Michelin-starred palaces. Along the way they illustrate the excitement, stunning topography, and energy that defines Hong Kong.

 

Hong Kong, Part 1 of 2
From hole-in-the-wall Chinese restaurants, to Michelin-starred palaces, Rudy and chef Daisuke Utagawa eat their way through the amazing foods & flavors of Hong Kong.

 

 

 

LUCKY CHOW
Food as Global Locavore

LUCKY CHOW: Food as Global Locavore

 

It isn’t just recipes that get imported and exported between the East and West, but also food practices. The farm to table movement is not at all uniquely American. We travel around China’s Hangzhou region with Dai Jianjun of Dragon’s Well Manor and to Sang Lee Farms in New York’s North Fork to see how widespread this movement to keep things local really is.

 

 

 

RUDY MAXA’S WORLD
Kyushu

RUDY MAXA’S WORLD: Kyushu

 

It was still snowing when the Rudy Maxa’s World film crew shot in Japan’s northern island of Hokkaido. But just short flight away, on one of Japan’s most southernmost islands, Kyushu, the cherry blossoms were out and beach goers were burying themselves in the hot sand-heated by the island’s volcanos-on beaches. Host Rudy Maxa and Washington, D.C. restauranteur and chef Daisuke Utagawa introduce many viewers to this lush island with luxurious resorts and a history of providing the world with Wagyu beef, black pork, and other delicacies that have made Japanese cuisine well known around the world.

 

Preview

 

 

 

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