Film

PBS Hawaiʻi to benefit from Consolidated Theatres
film screening series

In celebration of storytelling through film, Consolidated Theaters has selected PBS Hawai‘i as one of five local nonprofits to benefit from its Saturday screening series, “A Film for Every Decade.”

 

Every Saturday from August 26 through October 28, all Consolidated locations will present an iconic family film from every decade over the last 100 years. Admission is only $4. A portion of net ticket sales will support PBS Hawai‘i, as well as the following nonprofits: Boys and Girls Club of Hawai‘i, Hawai‘i Arts Alliance, Hawai‘i Public Radio and Ronald McDonald House Charities of Hawai‘i.

 

The screening series will take place at all Consolidated locations: Ward, ʻOlino, Kapolei, Mililani, Pearlridge, Kahala, Koko Marina, Koʻolau, Kaʻahumanu.

 

The chart below will be updated with online ticketing links as they are provided. For more information, please check with your Consolidated venue of choice.

 

Screening Date Film Titles Decade Year of release
26-Aug CHARLIE CHAPLIN’S THE KID 10’s – 20’s 1921
2-Sep THE WIZARD OF OZ 30’s 1939
9-Sep CASABLANCA 40’s 1942
16-Sep SINGIN’ IN THE RAIN 50’s 1952
23-Sep THE SOUND OF MUSIC 60′ 1965
30-Sep WILLY WONKA AND THE CHOCOLATE FACTORY 70’s 1971
7-Oct E.T. THE EXTRATERRESTRIAL 80’s 1982
14-Oct JURASSIC PARK 90’s 1993
21-Oct LILO AND STITCH 2000’s 2002
28-Oct MOANA 2010’s 2016

 

Free Screening of Chasing Trane: The John Coltrane Documentary

 

Free, public screening of Chasing Trane: The John Coltrane Documentary

Tuesday, October 24, 2017, 5:30 – 8:00 pm

PBS Hawaiʻi, 315 Sand Island Access Road, Honolulu

A part of Indie Lens Pop-Up – Presented by PBS Hawai‘i and Hawai‘i Women in Filmmaking

 

Chasing Trane: The John Coltrane Documentary is the first film in the 2017-2018 season of the Indie Lens Pop-Up community film screening series. Set against the social, political and cultural landscape of the times, Chasing Trane brings saxophone great John Coltrane to life, as a man and an artist. The film is the definitive look at the boundary-shattering musician whose influence continues to this day.

 

Chasing Trane features never-before-seen Coltrane family home movies, footage of Coltrane and his band in the studio (discovered in a California garage during the production of this film), along with hundreds of rare photographs and television appearances from around the world. Coltrane’s incredible story is told by the musicians who worked with him (Sonny Rollins, McCoy Tyner, Benny Golson, Jimmy Heath, Reggie Workman), musicians inspired by his fearless artistry and creative vision (Common, John Densmore, Wynton Marsalis, Carlos Santana, Wayne Shorter, Kamasi Washington), Coltrane’s children (Ravi, Oran, and step-daughters Michelle Coltrane and Antonia Andrews) and biographers, and well-known admirers such as President Bill Clinton and Dr. Cornel West.

Chasing Trane reveals the critical events, passions, experiences, and challenges that shaped Coltrane’s life and his revolutionary sounds. It is a story of demons and darkness, of persistence and redemption. Above all, it is the incredible spiritual journey of a man who found himself and, in the process, created an extraordinary body of work that transcends all barriers of geography, race, religion, and age. And naturally, the film is imbued throughout with Coltrane’s remarkable music.

Although Coltrane never did any television interviews (and only a handful for radio) during his lifetime, he has an active and vibrant presence in the film through thoughts he expressed during print interviews. These words—spoken by Academy Award winner Denzel Washington—illuminate what John Coltrane may have been thinking or feeling at critical moments throughout his life and career.


About The Filmmaker

John Scheinfeld is an Emmy®, Grammy® and Writers Guild Award nominee and writer/director/producer of documentaries for theatrical and television distribution. His films have premiered at Telluride, Toronto, Venice and IDFA and include The U.S. vs. John Lennon, Who Is Harry Nilsson (And Why Is Everybody Talkin’ About Him), We Believe, and Dick Cavett’s Watergate. In addition, Scheinfeld has written pilot scripts for drama series for ABC, CBS, NBC and Fox. He is a graduate of Oberlin College and received his MFA from Northwestern University.

 

 

 

 

‘Indie Lens Pop-Up’ film screenings return to PBS Hawai‘i’s studio

PBS Hawaii

For questions regarding this press release, contact:
Liberty Peralta
lperalta@pbshawaii.org
808.462.5030

 

Download this Press Release

 

HONOLULU, HI – Next month marks the return of Indie Lens Pop-Up, the free screenings of films from the award-winning PBS series, Independent Lens. PBS Hawai‘i and fellow creative nonprofit Hawai‘i Women in Filmmaking are the local co-presenters of Indie Lens Pop-Up.

 

Indie Lens Pop-Up brings people together for community-driven conversations around Independent Lens documentaries.

 

INDIE LENS POP-UP

 

All but one of the screenings will take place at PBS Hawai‘i’s headquarters at 315 Sand Island Access Road in Honolulu. The March 2018 film, Dolores, will be shown at the Honolulu Museum of Art’s Doris Duke Theatre, as part of Hawai‘i Women in Filmmaking’s annual Women of Wonders film festival.

 

“At a time when national conversations about important social issues seem to be overwhelmingly divided, our work with this program has provided a unique space for community members of diverse backgrounds and beliefs to come together and engage in dialogue with one another,” said Duong-Chi Do, Director of Engagement & Impact at Independent Television Service (ITVS), the presenting organization behind Independent Lens.

 

Indie Lens Pop-Up schedule, Fall 2017-Spring 2018

 

Chasing Trane: The John Coltrane Documentary / By John Scheinfeld

Tuesday, October 24, 5:30-8:00 pm

PBS Hawai‘i, 315 Sand Island Access Road, Honolulu

Set against the social, political and cultural landscape of the times, Chasing Trane brings saxophone great John Coltrane to life, as a man and an artist. The film is the definitive look at the boundary-shattering musician whose influence continues to this day.

 

I Am Not Your Negro / By Raoul Peck

Wednesday, November 15, 5:30-8:00 pm

PBS Hawai‘i, 315 Sand Island Access Road, Honolulu

One of the most acclaimed films of the year and an Oscar nominee for Best Documentary, I Am Not Your Negro envisions the book James Baldwin never finished. The result is a radical, up-to-the-minute examination of race in America, using Baldwin’s original words, spoken by Samuel L. Jackson, and with a flood of rich archival material.

 

Tell Them We Are Rising: The Story of Black Colleges and Universities /

By Stanley Nelson and Marco Williams

Tuesday, February 6, 5:30-8:00 pm

PBS Hawai‘i, 315 Sand Island Access Road, Honolulu

Tell Them We Are Rising explores the pivotal role historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) have played over the course of 150 years in American history, culture, and identity. This film reveals the rich history of HBCUs and the power of higher education to transform lives and advance civil rights and equality in the face of injustice.

 

Dolores / By Peter Bratt

Friday, March 2, 5:30-8:00 pm

Honolulu Museum of Art, Doris Duke Theatre, 900 South Beretania Street, Honolulu

With intimate and unprecedented access, Peter Bratt’s Dolores tells the story of Dolores Huerta, among the most important, yet least-known, activists in American history. Co-founder of the first farmworkers union with Cesar Chavez, she tirelessly led the fight for racial and labor justice, becoming one of the most defiant feminists of the 20th century.

 

Look & See: Wendell Berry’s Kentucky / By Laura Dunn

Tuesday, April 17, 5:30-8:00 pm

PBS Hawai‘i, 315 Sand Island Access Road, Honolulu

Look & See: Wendell Berry’s Kentucky is a portrait of the changing landscapes and shifting values of rural America in the era of industrial agriculture, as seen through the mind’s eye of award-winning writer and farmer Wendell Berry, back home in his native Henry County, Kentucky.

 

Served Like a Girl / By Lysa Heslov

Wednesday, May 23, 5:30-8:00 pm

PBS Hawai‘i, 315 Sand Island Access Road, Honolulu

Served Like a Girl provides a candid look at a shared sisterhood to help the rising number of homeless women veterans who served in Iraq and Afghanistan, and suffer from PTSD, sexual abuse, and other traumas. By entering into the “Ms. Veteran American” competition, these amazing ladies unexpectedly come full circle in a quest for healing and hope.

 


PBS Hawai‘i is a 501(c) (3) nonprofit organization and Hawai‘i’s sole member of the trusted Public Broadcasting Service (PBS). We advance learning and discovery through storytelling that profoundly touches people’s lives. We bring the world to Hawai‘i and Hawai‘i to the world. pbshawaii.org | facebook.com/pbshawaii | @pbshawaii

 

 

PBS Hawai‘i to host free 3D film screening

PBS Hawaii

***Update 8/21/17: RSVPs are at capacity for this event! We will have a standby line to fill up seats left by no-shows, though seating for those in the standby line is not guaranteed. There are 52 stalls in our parking lot, so we highly encourage carpooling whenever possible.***

 

For questions regarding this press release, contact:
Liberty Peralta
lperalta@pbshawaii.org
808.462.5030

 

Download this Press Release

 

PBS Hawai‘i to host free 3D film screening

Q&A to follow with Maui filmmaker Tom Vendetti, musician Keola Beamer

Tibetan Illusion Destroyer in 3D

 

HONOLULU, HI – PBS Hawai‘i will be hosting its first free 3D film screening at its Honolulu headquarters:

 

Tibetan Illusion Destroyer in 3D
Wednesday, August 23, 6-8 pm
PBS Hawai‘i, 315 Sand Island Access Road, Honolulu
Followed by Q&A with filmmaker Tom Vendetti and musician Keola Beamer
Free and open to the public – RSVP on eventbrite.com

 

Tibetan Illusion Destroyer is a documentary by Maui filmmaker Tom Vendetti about the Mani Rimdu Festival in Nepal, and its message, rooted in Tibetan Buddhism, of destroying man-made illusions that lead to human suffering.

 

“The film was shot in 3D to enhance the ‘illusion’ message and the overall viewing experience,” Vendetti said in a statement.

 

Vendetti and renowned slack key artist Keola Beamer were among a Hawai‘i contingent that journeyed to Nepal to witness and document the festival. Beamer worked with local musicians in Nepal to create the film’s original music. Both Vendetti and Beamer are scheduled for an audience Q&A session after the free screening.

 


PBS Hawai‘i is a 501(c) (3) nonprofit organization and Hawai‘i’s sole member of the trusted Public Broadcasting Service (PBS). We advance learning and discovery through storytelling that profoundly touches people’s lives. We bring the world to Hawai‘i and Hawai‘i to the world. pbshawaii.org | facebook.com/pbshawaii | @pbshawaii

 

Pacific Heartbeat

Pacific Heartbeat, now in its sixth season, is an anthology series that provides viewers with a glimpse of the real Pacific – its people, cultures and contemporary issues.  The series features a diverse array of programs that will draw viewers into the heart and soul of Pacific Island culture.

 

Pacific Heartbeat Season 6 airs Saturdays in May 2017 on PBS Hawaiʻi.

 

A co-presentation of Pacific Islanders in Communications and PBS Hawaiʻi

 

Visions in the Dark: The Life of Pinky Thompson

Saturday, May 6, 2017, 8 pm

Visions in the Dark: The Life of Pinky Thompson is a Hawaiian story of pain and promise, of challenge and triumph and a story of leadership.  Sustaining a serious eye wound in Normandy during WWII that left him in the dark for two years, Myron “Pinky” Thompson emerged with a clear vision of his purpose in life.  Thompson would go on to be a social worker, mentor and revered leader in the Native Hawaiian community who left a legacy of positive social change, pride in Pacific heritage and a strong sense of native identity among Hawaiians that flourishes today.

 

Ever the Land

Saturday, May 13, 2017, 8 pm

Ever The Land explores the sublime bond between people and their land.  For the past 150 years, longstanding grievances over extreme colonization tactics have defined the Ngāi (tribe) Tūhoe and New Zealand government’s relationship.  In 2014, history was made when the Tūhoe’s ancestral homelands were returned, the New Zealand government gave a official apology, and Tūhoe built the first-ever “Living Building” in Aotearoa (New Zealand) as a testament to their values and vision of self-governance.

 

Mele Murals

Saturday, May 20, 2017, 8 pm

Mele Murals is a documentary about the transformative power of art through the unlikely union of graffiti and ancient Hawaiian culture.  At the center of the story are two renowned street artists – Estria Miyashiro (aka Estria) and John Hina (aka Prime) – a group of Native Hawaiian youth, and the rural community of Waimea.  Through their stories, Mele Murals shows how public art and Native Hawaiian traditions transforms the artists, students and community.

Next Goal Wins

Saturday, May 27, 2017, 8 pm

In 2001, the tiny Pacific island of American Samoa suffered a world record 31-0 defeat at the hands of Australia, garnering headlines across the world as the worst football (soccer) team on the planet. Next Goal Wins is an inspirational story about the power of hope in the face of seemingly insurmountable odds, and an object lesson in what it really means to be a winner in life.

 

 

INDEPENDENT LENS
Birth of a Movement

 

Learn how D.W. Griffith’s 1915 film The Birth of a Nation unleashed a battle still waging today about race relations and representation, and the power and influence of Hollywood. This program features commentary by Spike Lee, Reginald Hudlin, Dr. Henry Louis Gates Jr. and others.

 

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