Tibetan Illusion Destroyer


This film by Maui filmmaker Tom Vendetti documents the Mani Rimdu Festival in Nepal, which originated in Tibet and is still performed in an authentic colorful ceremony in the shadow of Mount Everest. The title refers to the Buddhist concept of destroying man-made illusions that lead to human suffering. Vendetti and renowned Hawaiian musician Keola Beamer were part of a Hawai‘i contingent that journeyed to Nepal to attend the festival. Beamer worked with musicians in Nepal to create the film’s original music.



PBS Hawai‘i to present encore of Eddie and Myrna Kamae’s films

PBS HAWAI‘I – News Release

315 Sand Island Access Rd.| p: 808.462.5000|
Honolulu, HI 96819-2295| f: 808.462.5090

The Hawaiian Legacy Foundation, PBS Hawai‘i


For questions regarding this press release, contact:
Liberty Peralta


Download this Press Release


The Films of Eddie and Myrna Kamae, From the HeartHONOLULU, HI – PBS Hawai‘i will present an encore of The Films of Eddie and Myrna Kamae, From the Heart – a broadcast and online presentation of all 10 films by the late Eddie Kamae and his wife and collaborator, Myrna Kamae.


The encore presentation runs from Sunday, March 18 through Thursday, March 22, at 8:00 pm on each night, on PBS Hawai‘i. (The broadcast schedule and film summaries are included on the following pages.) All 10 films will also be available to stream online March 23-April 6 at


Last April, PBS Hawai‘i partnered with the Kamaes’ Hawaiian Legacy Foundation to present this unprecedented televised and online film festival. This showcase features all 10 award-winning documentaries in Eddie and Myrna Kamae’s Hawaiian Legacy Series, released 1988-2009.


Broadcast Schedule


Sunday, March 18, 8:00 – 10:00 pm


Lia: The Legacy of a Hawaiian Man (1988)

This documentary celebrates the music and spirit of Big Island performer and composer, Sam Li‘a Kalainaina (1881-1975). It is also about a place, Waipi‘o Valley, and a life shaped and nourished by that place. This film’s world premiere opened the 1988 Hawai‘i International Film Festival.


Those Who Came Before: The Musical Journey of Eddie Kamae (2009)

The Kamae’s final documentary pays tribute to the music of Hawaiians, whose gifts of knowledge helped guide Eddie Kamae. His pursuits led him to some of the most respected gate-keepers of the Hawaiian Renaissance: the author and translator Mary Kawena Pukui, the “Songwriter of Waipi‘o” Sam Li‘a, “Aloha Chant” author Pilahi Paki, and Hawaiian cultural resource Lilia “Mama” Hale. One by one, they entrusted him with key pieces of Hawai‘i’s musical heritage – inspiring him to understand, perform, and pass on to the children of Hawai‘i.


Monday, March 19, 8:00 – 10:30 pm


Lahaina: Waves of Change (2007)

In 1999, Eddie Kamae visited Lahaina, only to find that Pioneer Mill, the center of Lahaina’s sugar industry, was closing down. It was the end of an era – a simpler, more innocent time that Eddie remembers from visiting his grandmother during childhood summers in Lahaina. Eddie leads us through many of the changes Lahaina has undergone, both historical and personal. And despite all of the radical changes and tumultuous times Lahaina has experienced, it remains a sacred Hawaiian place, not because of what has been built upon it, but because of what is in the hearts of people who live there.


The History of the Sons of Hawaii (2000)

This documentary tells the story of the charismatic band that helped launch the Hawaiian cultural renaissance. Spanning 40 years of Hawai‘i’s rich musical tradition, the film offers an intimate look at a unique group of performers and composers: their songs, their humor and their devotion to a sound that continues to convey something essential about the Hawaiian spirit.


Tuesday, March 20, 8:00 – 10:00 pm


Kī Hō‘alu: Slack Key, The Hawaiian Way (1993)

Kī hō‘alu (slack key) is the Hawaiian way of making music. Performers and composers reveal how this unique style of playing conveys something essential about the Hawaiian spirit and the Hawaiian family tradition.


Luther Kahekili Makekau: A One Kine Hawaiian Man (1997)

This documentary pays tribute to the untamed spirit of a colorful and controversial Hawaiian man. Known throughout the islands, Luther Makekau was part philosopher and part outlaw, a chanter and a singer, a fighter, a lover, a cattle rustler, a rebel and a poet. Born on Maui in 1890, during the reign of King Kalākaua, he lived nearly 100 years, shaped by a century of turbulent cultural change.


Wednesday, March 21, 8:00 – 10:00 pm


Listen to the Forest (1991)

This environmental documentary speaks of the widespread concern for rainforest preservation, while reminding us of traditional Hawaiian values. Interviews, chants, and original songs and dances give voice to an older form of ecological wisdom summed up in the phrase “mālama ‘āina,” to take care of the land.


Hawaiian Voices: Bridging Past to Present (1998)

This documentary honors the role of kūpuna (elders) in preserving Hawaiian culture. It focuses on the legacies of three respected Hawaiian elders whose lives bridged the transition from older times into the late 20th century. They are Ruth Makaila Kaholoa‘a, age 93, of the Big Island; Lilia Wahinemaika‘i Hale, age 85, of O‘ahu and Molokai; and Reverend David “Kawika” Ka‘alakea, age 78, of Maui. Each is a living archive of invaluable lore and recollection, a treasure whose stories, memories and perspectives need to be shared as a way of bringing the healing wisdom of the past into the often fragmented world of the present.


Thursday, March 22, 8:00 – 10:00 pm


Words, Earth & Aloha: The Source of Hawaiian Music (1995)

In Hawai‘i, music has always been much more than a form of entertainment. Through the centuries, it has been a primary means of cultural continuity. This documentary pays tribute to a wide range of composers who flourished between the 1870s and the 1920s, and for whom Hawaiian was still a first language. The film explores the poetry and play of Hawaiian lyrics, as well as the places and features of the natural world that inspired songs still loved and listened to today.


Keepers of the Flame: The Cultural Legacy of Three Hawaiian Women (2005)

This documentary chronicles the lives of three Hawaiian women who helped to save the Hawaiian culture, which was in serious peril. The combined artistry and aloha of Mary Kawena Pukui, ‘Iolani Luahine and Edith Kanaka‘ole “helped to revive the flame of traditional Hawaiian culture – a flame that had almost died,” says Eddie Kamae in his on-camera introduction to the film.


PBS Hawai‘i is a 501(c) (3) nonprofit organization and Hawai‘i’s sole member of the trusted Public Broadcasting Service (PBS). We advance learning and discovery through storytelling that profoundly touches people’s lives. We bring the world to Hawai‘i and Hawai‘i to the world. | | @pbshawaii

The Hawaiian Legacy Foundation, founded by Eddie and Myrna Kamae, is a nonprofit organization that seeks to document, preserve and perpetuate the cultural heritage of Hawaiʻi through music, film and video, educational programs, community outreach and archival work.



The Films of Eddie & Myrna Kamae,
From the Heart

The Films of Eddie & Myrna Kamae - From the Heart


This March, PBS Hawai‘i presents an encore presentation of The Films of Eddie and Myrna Kamae, From the Heart. The on-air and online film festival showcases all 10 award-winning documentaries in the Kamaes’ Hawaiian Legacy Series, released between 1988 and 2007. Last April, PBS Hawai‘i partnered with the Kamaes’ nonprofit organization, Hawaiian Legacy Foundation, for the unprecedented broadcast and online presentation.


Eddie Kamae, who passed away in January 2017, was well known for his contributions to Hawaiian music. With his wife Myrna, he also made iconic films, perpetuating aspects of Hawai‘i’s cultural heritage for future generations.



PBS Hawaiʻi to benefit from Consolidated Theatres
film screening series

In celebration of storytelling through film, Consolidated Theaters has selected PBS Hawai‘i as one of five local nonprofits to benefit from its Saturday screening series, “A Film for Every Decade.”


Every Saturday from August 26 through October 28, all Consolidated locations will present an iconic family film from every decade over the last 100 years. Admission is only $4. A portion of net ticket sales will support PBS Hawai‘i, as well as the following nonprofits: Boys and Girls Club of Hawai‘i, Hawai‘i Arts Alliance, Hawai‘i Public Radio and Ronald McDonald House Charities of Hawai‘i.


The screening series will take place at all Consolidated locations: Ward, ʻOlino, Kapolei, Mililani, Pearlridge, Kahala, Koko Marina, Koʻolau, Kaʻahumanu.


The chart below will be updated with online ticketing links as they are provided. For more information, please check with your Consolidated venue of choice.


Screening Date Film Titles Decade Year of release
26-Aug CHARLIE CHAPLIN’S THE KID 10’s – 20’s 1921
2-Sep THE WIZARD OF OZ 30’s 1939
9-Sep CASABLANCA 40’s 1942
16-Sep SINGIN’ IN THE RAIN 50’s 1952
23-Sep THE SOUND OF MUSIC 60′ 1965
14-Oct JURASSIC PARK 90’s 1993
21-Oct LILO AND STITCH 2000’s 2002
28-Oct MOANA 2010’s 2016


Free Screening of Chasing Trane: The John Coltrane Documentary


Free, public screening of Chasing Trane: The John Coltrane Documentary

Tuesday, October 24, 2017, 5:30 – 8:00 pm

PBS Hawaiʻi, 315 Sand Island Access Road, Honolulu

A part of Indie Lens Pop-Up – Presented by PBS Hawai‘i and Hawai‘i Women in Filmmaking


Chasing Trane: The John Coltrane Documentary is the first film in the 2017-2018 season of the Indie Lens Pop-Up community film screening series. Set against the social, political and cultural landscape of the times, Chasing Trane brings saxophone great John Coltrane to life, as a man and an artist. The film is the definitive look at the boundary-shattering musician whose influence continues to this day.


Chasing Trane features never-before-seen Coltrane family home movies, footage of Coltrane and his band in the studio (discovered in a California garage during the production of this film), along with hundreds of rare photographs and television appearances from around the world. Coltrane’s incredible story is told by the musicians who worked with him (Sonny Rollins, McCoy Tyner, Benny Golson, Jimmy Heath, Reggie Workman), musicians inspired by his fearless artistry and creative vision (Common, John Densmore, Wynton Marsalis, Carlos Santana, Wayne Shorter, Kamasi Washington), Coltrane’s children (Ravi, Oran, and step-daughters Michelle Coltrane and Antonia Andrews) and biographers, and well-known admirers such as President Bill Clinton and Dr. Cornel West.

Chasing Trane reveals the critical events, passions, experiences, and challenges that shaped Coltrane’s life and his revolutionary sounds. It is a story of demons and darkness, of persistence and redemption. Above all, it is the incredible spiritual journey of a man who found himself and, in the process, created an extraordinary body of work that transcends all barriers of geography, race, religion, and age. And naturally, the film is imbued throughout with Coltrane’s remarkable music.

Although Coltrane never did any television interviews (and only a handful for radio) during his lifetime, he has an active and vibrant presence in the film through thoughts he expressed during print interviews. These words—spoken by Academy Award winner Denzel Washington—illuminate what John Coltrane may have been thinking or feeling at critical moments throughout his life and career.

About The Filmmaker

John Scheinfeld is an Emmy®, Grammy® and Writers Guild Award nominee and writer/director/producer of documentaries for theatrical and television distribution. His films have premiered at Telluride, Toronto, Venice and IDFA and include The U.S. vs. John Lennon, Who Is Harry Nilsson (And Why Is Everybody Talkin’ About Him), We Believe, and Dick Cavett’s Watergate. In addition, Scheinfeld has written pilot scripts for drama series for ABC, CBS, NBC and Fox. He is a graduate of Oberlin College and received his MFA from Northwestern University.





‘Indie Lens Pop-Up’ film screenings return to PBS Hawai‘i’s studio

PBS Hawaii

For questions regarding this press release, contact:
Liberty Peralta


Download this Press Release


HONOLULU, HI – Next month marks the return of Indie Lens Pop-Up, the free screenings of films from the award-winning PBS series, Independent Lens. PBS Hawai‘i and fellow creative nonprofit Hawai‘i Women in Filmmaking are the local co-presenters of Indie Lens Pop-Up.


Indie Lens Pop-Up brings people together for community-driven conversations around Independent Lens documentaries.




All but one of the screenings will take place at PBS Hawai‘i’s headquarters at 315 Sand Island Access Road in Honolulu. The March 2018 film, Dolores, will be shown at the Honolulu Museum of Art’s Doris Duke Theatre, as part of Hawai‘i Women in Filmmaking’s annual Women of Wonders film festival.


“At a time when national conversations about important social issues seem to be overwhelmingly divided, our work with this program has provided a unique space for community members of diverse backgrounds and beliefs to come together and engage in dialogue with one another,” said Duong-Chi Do, Director of Engagement & Impact at Independent Television Service (ITVS), the presenting organization behind Independent Lens.


Indie Lens Pop-Up schedule, Fall 2017-Spring 2018


Chasing Trane: The John Coltrane Documentary / By John Scheinfeld

Tuesday, October 24, 5:30-8:00 pm

PBS Hawai‘i, 315 Sand Island Access Road, Honolulu

Set against the social, political and cultural landscape of the times, Chasing Trane brings saxophone great John Coltrane to life, as a man and an artist. The film is the definitive look at the boundary-shattering musician whose influence continues to this day.


I Am Not Your Negro / By Raoul Peck

Wednesday, November 15, 5:30-8:00 pm

PBS Hawai‘i, 315 Sand Island Access Road, Honolulu

One of the most acclaimed films of the year and an Oscar nominee for Best Documentary, I Am Not Your Negro envisions the book James Baldwin never finished. The result is a radical, up-to-the-minute examination of race in America, using Baldwin’s original words, spoken by Samuel L. Jackson, and with a flood of rich archival material.


Tell Them We Are Rising: The Story of Black Colleges and Universities /

By Stanley Nelson and Marco Williams

Tuesday, February 6, 5:30-8:00 pm

PBS Hawai‘i, 315 Sand Island Access Road, Honolulu

Tell Them We Are Rising explores the pivotal role historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) have played over the course of 150 years in American history, culture, and identity. This film reveals the rich history of HBCUs and the power of higher education to transform lives and advance civil rights and equality in the face of injustice.


Dolores / By Peter Bratt

Friday, March 2, 5:30-8:00 pm

Honolulu Museum of Art, Doris Duke Theatre, 900 South Beretania Street, Honolulu

With intimate and unprecedented access, Peter Bratt’s Dolores tells the story of Dolores Huerta, among the most important, yet least-known, activists in American history. Co-founder of the first farmworkers union with Cesar Chavez, she tirelessly led the fight for racial and labor justice, becoming one of the most defiant feminists of the 20th century.


Look & See: Wendell Berry’s Kentucky / By Laura Dunn

Tuesday, April 17, 5:30-8:00 pm

PBS Hawai‘i, 315 Sand Island Access Road, Honolulu

Look & See: Wendell Berry’s Kentucky is a portrait of the changing landscapes and shifting values of rural America in the era of industrial agriculture, as seen through the mind’s eye of award-winning writer and farmer Wendell Berry, back home in his native Henry County, Kentucky.


Served Like a Girl / By Lysa Heslov

Wednesday, May 23, 5:30-8:00 pm

PBS Hawai‘i, 315 Sand Island Access Road, Honolulu

Served Like a Girl provides a candid look at a shared sisterhood to help the rising number of homeless women veterans who served in Iraq and Afghanistan, and suffer from PTSD, sexual abuse, and other traumas. By entering into the “Ms. Veteran American” competition, these amazing ladies unexpectedly come full circle in a quest for healing and hope.


PBS Hawai‘i is a 501(c) (3) nonprofit organization and Hawai‘i’s sole member of the trusted Public Broadcasting Service (PBS). We advance learning and discovery through storytelling that profoundly touches people’s lives. We bring the world to Hawai‘i and Hawai‘i to the world. | | @pbshawaii



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