Food

LIDIA’S KITCHEN
Starring Olive Oil

 

Olive oil is an essential staple in every Italian home. It’s the easiest way to add flavor to any soup, and Lidia shows you how when making cannellini bean and lentil soup. Olive oil is also used in desserts, and she makes olive oil cake.

 

 

 

DINING WITH THE CHEF
Artisan Edition in Akita: Kiritampo-Nabe (Rice Stick Hot Pot)

DINING WITH THE CHEF - Artisan Edition in Akita: Kiritampo-Nabe (Rice Stick Hot Pot)

 

We’ll be visiting the far northern prefecture of Akita and learning about Akita’s local cooking over two episodes. In the first episode, we’ll learn about Kiritampo-nabe, a hotpot dish once cooked by the Matagi, hunters who lived in the mountains. This hotpot contains local Hinai chicken, seri, maitake mushrooms, burdock root, and kiritampo, the item that gives the dish its name. Made by mashing rice, then spreading it on a stick and grilling it, kiritampo are perfect for soaking up the rich flavor of the Hinai chicken soup. We’ll also learn about Akita’s unique food culture, full of the flavors of nature.

 

 

 

LIDIA’S KITCHEN
Spice it Up

 

Spices impart a lot of flavor to a recipe, and today Lidia shows viewers how to use different spices. First on the menu is mussels with fennel and saffron, an elegant and luxurious way to serve mussels. Lidia loves peperoncino in almost any dish, especially when making spicy stuffed clams. And finally, Lidia makes chicken and zucchini salad with horseradish dressing.

 

 

 

DINING WITH THE CHEF
Artisan Edition in Akita: Koji

DINING WITH THE CHEF: Artisan Edition in Akita: Koji

 

Discover the basics of Japanese cuisine with professionals. Chef Saito provides easy guidance for making authentic dishes, while Chef Rika gives helpful advice on quick and stylish cuisine.

 

Artisan Edition in Akita: Koji

We’re visiting the far northern prefecture of Akita and learning about Akita’s cooking over two episodes. In this second episode, we’ll learn about koji, used to make indispensable Japanese ingredients like miso, soy sauce, sake, or mirin. The town of Yokote, Akita is famous nationwide for its rice, and the town’s food culture features many fermented items based on the use of this exceptional rice has been used to make koji since long ago. By mixing koji and salt, we can make the all-purpose condiment shio-koji that has been sweeping Japan in the past few years. We’ll learn a simple recipe to make shio-koji, and see ways to use it to make Japanese dishes even more delicious. This week, we hope to introduce the world to the mysterious and wonderful powers of koji!

 

 

 

LUCKY CHOW
Chinatown, Reimagined

 

This series travels across the United States to explore Asian cuisine’s impact on American food culture. Hosted by Danielle Chang, the six-part series explores a wide variety of Asian food and drink and meets the new generation of chefs and entrepreneurs dedicated to keeping traditions alive. The series features renowned chefs and culinary personalities such as Top Chef winner Kristen Kish, YouTube sensation Maangchi, Chinese master chef Susur Lee and ramen entrepreneur Ivan Orkin.

 

Chinatown, Reimagined
Track the evolution of Chinese food in America through the eyes of two third- generation Chinese American restaurateurs. Wilson Tang preserves the legacy of his family’s dim sum parlor (America’s oldest) while opening a fine-dining Chinese restaurant on Chinatown’s expanding Lower East Side. Ed Schoenfeld, a self-proclaimed Chinese food expert and owner of one of the most critically acclaimed Chinese restaurants in New York, provides a tutorial on Peking duck preparation.

 

 

 

LUCKY CHOW
Bay Area’s Pacific Rim Cuisine

 

Meet Olivia Wu, designer of the original Asian restaurant concepts on the Google’s campus. Go behind-the-scenes at Google’s first sit-down restaurant, Baadal, where Chef Irfan Dama serves up biryani, an Indian rice dish. Then, meet two retired executives who, after careers in Silicon Valley, returned to their ancestral Japanese farming roots and constructed an indoor vertical farm.

 

 

 

RUDY MAXA’S WORLD
Food, Drink and Place

RUDY MAXA’S WORLD: Food, Drink and Place - Asada in Argentina

 

At Istanbul’s Spice Market, persimmons are split open, their insides resembling melting rubies. Brown-gold paprika is carefully molded into the shape of a pyramid. Cinnamon, cumin, ginger, and cardamom infuse the air with the fragrance of the East. From haggis in Scotland to soba and tea in Japan, from asada in Argentina to bibimbap in Korea, food and drink help illustrate the culture of a place and its people.

 

 

 

LUCKY CHOW
Filipino Entrepreneurs

 

This series travels across the United States to explore Asian cuisine’s impact on American food culture. Hosted by Danielle Chang, the six-part series explores a wide variety of Asian food and drink and meets the new generation of chefs and entrepreneurs dedicated to keeping traditions alive. The series features renowned chefs and culinary personalities such as Top Chef winner Kristen Kish, YouTube sensation Maangchi, Chinese master chef Susur Lee and ramen entrepreneur Ivan Orkin.

 

Filipino Entrepreneurs
Filipinos comprise the second-largest Asian American population nationwide, yet their cuisine is relatively unknown. PJ Quesada, founder of the Filipino Food Movement, explains Filipino cuisine while feasting at his friend Tim Luym’s restaurant in San Mateo, CA. Then we meet restaurateur Nicole Ponseca, who left her life as an advertising executive in New York to give voice to her culture through food. Finally, the two friends behind Bling Bling Dumplings manufacture thousands of dumplings – from scratch, at home – to serve at festivals.

 

 

 

 

LUCKY CHOW
Northern Thai Cuisine

 

Andy Ricker, a carpenter-turned-chef from Portland, OR, prepares a welcome dinner for the participating chefs at LA’s Lotus of Siam restaurant, with chef/owner Saipin Chutima at the helm. The duo create their collective version of a spicy Issan dish. At the table, Jet Tila rhapsodizes about the days when his family opened America’s first Thai grocery store in Hollywood and introduced lemongrass, kaffir lime leaves and other ingredients to the American palate.

 

 

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI
Indigenous Agriculture

 

Hawaiʻi grows only 10 to 13 percent of the food consumed in the Islands. The State is pushing to double local production by 2020. A new study suggests that Hawaiʻi consider applying traditional Native Hawaiian agricultural practices and principles as a solution – especially with increased threats caused by climate change.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

 

 

 

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