Food

LUCKY CHOW
Koreatown U.S.A.

 

This episode visits New York and Los Angeles – home to the two largest Korean populations in the United States – to explore what distinguishes each. Both are 24-hour hubs of food and drinking culture. However, New York City’s Koreatown covers just one block, whereas Los Angeles’ Koreatown seems like a city unto itself. At dinner with host Lisa Ling and her husband Paul Song, Chef Sang Yoon breaks down the basics of Korean cooking. Back in New York, Top Chef winner Kristen Kish, a Seoul-born Korean adoptee, receives a kimchi tutorial from Korean YouTube sensation, Maangchi. The episode ends with a night out at Pocha 32, an export of Korea’s popular “tent” restaurants.

 

 

 

RUDY MAXA’S WORLD
Bangkok

 

Bangkok is a city of the senses – a bejeweled, dazzling, fantastical mix of magic and faith, hard work and love of life, grace and wild abandon. It’s a city where chaos and serenity happily co-exist. Host Rudy Maxa and Washington, D.C. restauranteur and chef Daisuke Utagawa roll up their sleeves and prepare to eat their way across this city. Bangkok is one enormous dining room. Nobody eats at home; everything in this tropical town happens on the street. These fun loving, food crazy, spiritually rich, profoundly graceful people make Bangkok one of the most welcoming cities in the world.

 

 

 

LUCKY CHOW
Ramen Mania

 

Ivan Orkin, a New Yorker-turned-Japanese-ramen-chef, discusses ramen culture in New York versus Tokyo. Chef Nakamura from Sun Noodles explains what makes a great bowl of ramen. Later, seafood purveyor-turned-ramen-chef Yuji Haraguchi creates a New York deli-style version of his broth-less ramen dish, mazemen.

 

 

 

RUDY MAXA’S WORLD
Hong Kong, Part 2 of 2

RUDY MAXA’S WORLD: Hong Kong, Part 2 of 2

 

The iconic photo of Hong Kong is a wall of skyscrapers against Victoria Peak with the city’s harbor as a foreground. But on the other side of the island there are beaches and miles of forest hiking trails. Travel journalist Rudy Maxa and Washington, D.C. restaurateur Daisuke Utagawa explore both sides of the island, from the frenetic night life of the “mid-level’s” bars and restaurants behind those skyscrapers to the calm waters of Repulse Bay on the quiet side of Hong Kong. Dramatic photography by renowned shooters Karel Bauer and Joe Pontecorvo bring Hong Kong into viewers’ homes as never before.

 

 

 

LUCKY CHOW
Food as Beauty

LUCKY CHOW: Food as Beauty

 

Asian beauty secrets have long held fascination with Western audiences. Charlotte Cho from Sokoglam shows us how the K-Beauty boom is all over mainstream America today. We talk to the (mostly) women leading the charge in the cosmetics and skincare scene and disrupting the American beauty industry, from inside out.

 

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RUDY MAXA’S WORLD
Hong Kong, Part 1 of 2

RUDY MAXA’S WORLD: Hong Kong, Part 1

 

A bastion of capitalism under the umbrella of China, a city with a stunning array of architecturally interesting skyscrapers, and a city where shopping and dining are varsity sports, Hong Kong certainly ranks as one of the world’s great cities. Host Rudy Maxa and Washington, D.C. restaurateur and chef Daisuke Utagawa enthusiastically eat their way through Hong Kong, from cheap but authentic, hole-in-the-wall Chinese restaurants to Michelin-starred palaces. Along the way they illustrate the excitement, stunning topography, and energy that defines Hong Kong.

 

Hong Kong, Part 1 of 2
From hole-in-the-wall Chinese restaurants, to Michelin-starred palaces, Rudy and chef Daisuke Utagawa eat their way through the amazing foods & flavors of Hong Kong.

 

 

 

LUCKY CHOW
Food as AZN

LUCKY CHOW: Food as Azn

 

The next generation of Asian Americans are redefining what it means to be Asian in the U.S. by keeping one foot in the past, and the other in the future. We talk to renegade chefs, entrepreneurs and cultural ambassadors from Canal Street Market to the dance party sensation Bubble_T to see what’s in store for the future of Asians in the mainstream.

 

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LUCKY CHOW
Food as Wellness

LUCKY CHOW: Food As Wellness

 

As bone broth and kombucha line the shelves of your local grocery store, we take a closer look at “food as medicine”. From visits to the Traditional Chinese Medicine Centre in China, Manhattan Chinatown’s Po Wing Market and Seoul’s Kimchi Museum, we learn that food is so much more than just sustenance.

 

 

 

LUCKY CHOW
Food as Global Locavore

LUCKY CHOW: Food as Global Locavore

 

It isn’t just recipes that get imported and exported between the East and West, but also food practices. The farm to table movement is not at all uniquely American. We travel around China’s Hangzhou region with Dai Jianjun of Dragon’s Well Manor and to Sang Lee Farms in New York’s North Fork to see how widespread this movement to keep things local really is.

 

 

 

LUCKY CHOW
Food as Art

LUCKY CHOW: Food as Art

 

Today, what we watch can be just as appetizing as what we eat. From the Korean art of mukbang to viral sensations, artists both amateur and professional are using food as their medium of choice. Being a foodie today is just as likely to happen in a 24/7 Korean spa as it is in a restaurant.

 

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