politics

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
Post-Election 2016 – Our Expectations

 

Although difficult to imagine, the 2016 Election will be over after Tuesday, Nov. 8. The U.S. Congress, our State Legislature and the County Councils will soon be back in session working on the issues debated and promises made during recent campaigns. All three levels government will be represented on this edition of INSIGHTS.

 

U.S. Senator Mazie Hirono, U.S. Congresswoman-elect Colleen Hanabusa, State Speaker of the House Joe Souki and Senate President Ron Kouchi will discuss how our Congressional team and State leadership plan to work together during 2017 and what they fully expect to accomplish in the coming year.

 

We’ve also invited Maui, Kaua‘i and Hawai‘i County Council members to join Honolulu City Council Chair, Ernie Martin.

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 


More incumbents sitting out debates?

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I: The set of INSIGHTS

 

Leslie Wilcox, President and CEO of PBS HawaiiGeneral Managers of PBS stations across the country met last month for a strategy session, looking at what kind of programming is needed most in our country, and how to make the content more responsive and more interactive.

 

And in this election year of deep divisions and negativity, we compared notes on our television stations’ political debates and other forums. Longtime station managers remarked that they’d never seen so many local incumbents decline to appear with their challengers on live telecasts and live web streams.

 

“These incumbents have the money to create their own messages through advertising, and that’s what they’re doing instead,” said Tom Axtell, the head of Vegas PBS and a member of the PBS Board of Directors. Another GM noted that many candidates no longer feel obligated to appear alongside their competition because they can speak to the public through low-cost social media.

 

In Hawai‘i, we had our share of incumbents turning down participation in our weekly election forum on Insights on PBS Hawai‘i, noting scheduling conflicts. We know that candidates are busy, so we generally ask them early. And we realize that incumbents may not be terribly motivated to let their lesser-known competitors receive statewide air time.

 

In addition, incumbents from 34 Hawai‘i State House and Senate races faced no opposition from another major-party candidate.

 

We even had a challenger withdraw from a General Election forum. That was Honolulu Mayoral candidate and political veteran Charles Djou. His campaign contended that it had never committed to the forum. (Before the Primary Election, Djou did take part in our forum with incumbent Mayor Kirk Caldwell and former Mayor Peter Carlisle.)

 

The rebuffs by candidates in some major races had a silver lining, freeing up TV time for district races, especially outside Honolulu and beyond O‘ahu. Incumbents and challengers with different ideas sat down at the same table, engaging in some interesting, vigorous and respectful discussions.

 

Viewers could feel the fresh breeze of democracy. At its best, this civil discourse provided much-needed substance and helped voters make their choice at the polls.

 

As Communications Professor John Hart of Hawai‘i Pacific University commented in a Honolulu Civil Beat podcast with reporter Chad Blair last October 10: “I still believe [debates] are our best chance to see past the pseudo-events, the slick advertisements. When you hear someone talk for an hour, you get a sense of who they are.”

 

This public media organization wants to thank all of the election candidates who accepted our invitation to inform voters by answering viewer questions and taking part in civil discourse on Insights on PBS Hawai‘i.

 

A hui hou (until next time)…
Leslie signature

 

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
Why Vote

 

We all hear the reasons and excuses. But we’re in last place. CNN did a feature story on us and called Hawai‘i “The State That Doesn’t Vote.”

 

It hasn’t always been that way. In 1959, 93 percent of registered voters cast a ballot. In the 60s, voter turnout was consistently in the high 80 percentile. In 1974, we dropped to 79 percent, but bounced back into the 80 percentile during the 1980s.

 

The downward spiral started in 1996, when 67 percent of all registered voters showed up at the polls. Our all-time low of 52 percent was posted in the last General Election – the lowest voter turnout in the country.

 

So who are the conscientious, responsible, loyal citizens among us who will be counted in next Tuesday’s General Election?

 

On the next Insights on PBS Hawai‘i, we’ll hear from three of them: a millennial who has managed not to be disillusioned; a long-time believer in the process who has voted consistently throughout the decades; and a naturalized U.S. citizen who embraces the privilege of participating in America’s democracy. They’ll be joined by Colin Moore, political science professor at University of Hawai‘i – Manoa; Spencer Oshita, Editor of Ka Leo O Hawai‘i; and Wayne Yoshioka, reporter at Hawaii Public Radio.

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 




INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
Honolulu Charter Amendment 7 / State House District 34

 

Should the City and County of Honolulu create an Office of Climate Change, Sustainability and Resiliency? Oahu residents will be asked to vote on that question which is just one of 20 Charter Amendments on the November ballot. Charter Commission representative Cheryl Soon will debate the merits of Amendment 7 with Libertarian and Downtown Neighborhood Board member Andrew Rothstein.

 

And it’s a 2014 rematch for State House District 34 covering Waimalu, Pearl City and Pacific Palisades. Two-term Democrat Gregg Takayama faces Republican challenger Jaci Agustin. Although Takayama defeated Agustin in the last election by nearly 2,000 votes, this rematch attracted national attention when the Republican State Leadership Committee named the race one of “16 in 16” races to watch across America.

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 



THE CONTENDERS – 16 for 16
Perot/Nader – The Independents

THE CONTENDERS - 16 for 16: Perot/Nader - The Independents

 

This eight-part series reveals the humanity, the twists of fate and the surprising mistakes behind 16 of the most compelling and tumultuous presidential campaigns in modern history. Revisit the past 50 years of presidential election history to see how previous campaigns are still influencing politics in unexpected ways.

 

Perot/Nader – The Independents
Follow the third-party campaigns of billionaire H. Ross Perot in 1992 and consumer advocate Ralph Nader in 2000.

 

PBS Newshour SPECIAL REPORT
Presidential Debate

 

FOX News Sunday anchor Chris Wallace moderates the final presidential candidates’ debate at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. The PBS NEWSHOUR presents live coverage of the debate followed by analysis, co-anchored by Gwen Ifill and Judy Woodruff, with David Brooks, Mark Shields, Amy Walter and John Yang.

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
Maui County Council – Upcountry Maui / O‘ahu Charter Amendment 1

 

Gladys Baisa cannot run again for Maui County Council due to term limits. The non-partisan race for her seat representing Upcountry Maui is between Kula resident Yuki Lei Sugimura, a small business owner and former aide to Senator Daniel Akaka, and Napua Greig-Nakasone, an entertainer and kumu hula who also served on the State Land Use Commission.

 

Greig-Nakasone and Sugimura are scheduled for this live discussion on their perspectives on Upcountry Maui issues, including: the legalization of cock fighting, metered water service, a realistic benchmark for what is referred to as “affordable” housing, and the controversial matter of jurisdiction behind the current GMO moratorium – is it federal or local?

 

We’ll also take a close look at one of the 20 Charter Amendments going before O‘ahu voters in November. If Amendment 1 passes, it would give the Police Commission greater authority in holding the Honolulu Police Department accountable. But does it go far enough?

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 



PBS Newshour SPECIAL REPORT
Presidential Debate

 

ABC’s chief global affairs correspondent Martha Raddatz and CNN anchor Anderson Cooper moderate the second presidential debate at Washington University in St. Louis, MO. The PBS NEWSHOUR presents live coverage of the presidential candidates’ debate followed by analysis, co-anchored by Gwen Ifill and Judy Woodruff, with David Brooks, Lisa Desjardins, Mark Shields and Amy Walter.

 

This program will encore at 6:30 pm

 

THE CONTENDERS – 16 for 16
Goldwater/Reagan – The Conservatives

 

This eight-part series reveals the humanity, the twists of fate and the surprising mistakes behind 16 of the most compelling and tumultuous presidential campaigns in modern history. Revisit the past 50 years of presidential election history to see how previous campaigns are still influencing politics in unexpected ways.

 

Goldwater/Reagan – The Conservatives
Follow the political career of Barry Goldwater, who lost his presidential bid in ’64, but whose conservatism sowed the seeds of Ronald Reagan’s entry into politics.

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
Maui County Council – Moloka‘i / State Senate District 25

 

 

With an unemployment rate of more than 15 percent, the GMO ban would hit Moloka‘i the hardest. Maui County Council incumbent Stacy Crivello and challenger Keani Rawlins- Fernandez discuss how they plan to boost employment opportunities for Moloka‘i residents.

 

State District 25 Senator Laura Thielen and her Republican challenger, Robert Nagamine, are featured during the show’s second half. Theilen has been fighting to preserve agricultural land on behalf of the Windward O‘ahu district, while Nagamine says his top priority is helping people, especially the homeless.

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

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