Programming

PBS Hawai‘i reschedules live KĀKOU town hall for Oct. 25

PBS HAWAI‘I – News Release

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Honolulu, HI 96819-2295| f: 808.462.5090

 

For questions regarding this press release, contact:
Liberty Peralta
lperalta@pbshawaii.org
808.462.5030­

 

Download this Press Release

 

September 11, 2018

 

PBS Hawaiʻi reschedules live KĀKOU town hall for Oct. 25Due to the unpredictability of Tropical Storm Olivia’s effects, PBS Hawai‘i has postponed its live statewide conversation about “The Future of Work” until Oct. 25. This KĀKOU – Hawai‘i’s Town Hall was originally scheduled for Thursday.

 

The two-hour live program with 40 studio participants and social media input will ask: Are we preparing ourselves and our children for a future where technology will transform the workplace – and our lives?

 

Representatives from government, business, labor, education and nonprofit organizations will come together for this community conversation about what’s referred to as “the fourth Industrial Revolution.” What does this revolution look like, and what do these transformational changes mean for Hawai‘i’s economy and employment landscape? Is this an opportunity to reshape the future of work in Hawai‘i?

 

The discussion airs on PBS Hawai‘i on Oct. 25 from 8:00 to 10:00 pm. A live stream will also be available on pbshawaii.org and PBS Hawai‘i’s Facebook page. Viewers are invited to join the discussion by emailing kakou@pbshawaii.org using the #PBSKakou hashtag on Twitter, or leaving a comment on the Facebook live stream.

 

KĀKOU – Hawai‘i’s Town Hall is a periodic series of live town hall-style discussions around pivotal topics that affect our Islands.

 


PBS Hawai‘i is a 501(c) (3) nonprofit organization and Hawai‘i’s sole member of the trusted Public Broadcasting Service (PBS). We advance learning and discovery through storytelling that profoundly touches people’s lives. We bring the world to Hawai‘i and Hawai‘i to the world. pbshawaii.org | facebook.com/pbshawaii | @pbshawaii


 

 

Pinkalicious & Peterrific

 

Pinkalicious & Peterrific

 

PBS Hawai‘i welcomes Pinkalicious & Peterrific to the PBS KIDS lineup!

 

Pinkalicious & Peterrific

 

Based on the best-selling book series by author-illustrator Victoria Kann, the new animated series Pinkalicious & Peterrific follows the adventures of Pinkalicious and her brother Peter. Pinkalicious imagines creative possibilities everywhere she looks, with the help from Peter and her neighborhood friends.

 

Designed for children ages 3-5, Pinkalicious & Peterrific encourages children to engage in the creative arts and self-expression, covering areas such as music, dance and visual arts.

 

Digital Resources

The Pinkalicious & Peterrific television series is part of a multiplatform media experience. Links to digital resources for kids, parents and educators are below.

 

For Kids: http://pbskids.org/pinkalicious

For Parents: http://www.pbs.org/parents/pinkalicious/home/

For Educators: https://hawaii.pbslearningmedia.org/search/?q=pinkalicious

 

 

Hōkūle‘a Programming

By Liberty Peralta

I ka wā ma mua, ka wā ma hope.
In the past, lies the future.

Hawaiian Proverb

Hōkūle‘a - I ka wā ma mua, ka wā ma hope. In the past, lies the future.

©2015 Polynesian Voyaging Society | Photo: ‘Ōiwi TV – Photographer: Bryson Hoe

 

For three years, Hōkūle‘a and its sister vessel, Hikianalia, journeyed 42,000 miles around the world, stopping at more than 150 ports to share the message of “Mālama Honua” (caring for Island Earth). Rigorously trained navigators led the way with traditional Polynesian wayfinding methods, using nature – including wind, water and stars – as their guide.

 

In June, the vessels and their crew returned safely to Hawaiian waters, marking an unprecedented accomplishment in Polynesian voyaging.

 

With the completion of this worldwide voyage, a new chapter is set to begin for Hōkūle‘a and Hikianalia: an eight-month sail to 30 ports throughout the Hawaiian Islands. The Polynesian Voyaging Society calls this leg the most important part of the voyage.

 

“We will go to as many as 70 communities and 100 schools to thank Hawai‘i’s people and share what we have learned with the children,” said Nainoa Thompson, Polynesian Voyaging Society President, and one of the organization’s master navigators.

 

PBS Hawai‘i celebrates this next phase with a collection of interviews and documentaries that revisit the people and events that helped shape the modern resurgence of Polynesian voyaging, and simultaneously, our Pacific Island cultures. Discover how Hōkūle‘a became a revered icon for so many – for Hawai‘i, Polynesia and our Island Earth.

 

LONG STORY SHORT WITH LESLIE WILCOX: SAM LOW: RAISING ISLANDS (2014)

Tuesday, August 8, 7:30 pm

LONG STORY SHORT WITH LESLIE WILCOX:
SAM LOW: RAISING ISLANDS (2014)

In this conversation, Sam Low reveals chickenskin moments onboard as Hōkūle‘a’s documentarian, including the optical illusion he’d see when the vessel approached land – an island rising out of the water. For his book, Hawaiki Rising, Low spent hours interviewing his cousin, master navigator Nainoa Thompson. In these moments, Low came to know Thompson’s fears, dreams and vision.

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I: The Next Journey

Thursday, August 10, 8:00 pm

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I:
The Next Journey

INSIGHTS convenes Polynesian Voyaging Society leadership and several crewmembers of the Hōkūle‘a voyaging canoe for a live discussion about their Next Journey. Scheduled to appear are the voyaging society’s President Nainoa Thompson, Hōkūle‘a crewmembers Miki Tomita and Eric Co, and University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa President David Lassner, who was a crewmember on Hōkūle‘a’s U.S. East Coast leg.

 

THE NAVIGATORS: PATHFINDERS OF THE PACIFIC

Thursday, August 10, 9:00 pm

PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS:
THE NAVIGATORS: PATHFINDERS OF THE PACIFIC (1983)

Directed by Sam Low and Boyd Estus, this documentary explores the heritage of Polynesian wayfinding, and how indigenous Pacific societies sustained their navigational practices and practitioners. The film features Mau Piailug, who was at that point the last known navigator to be ceremonially initiated on Satawal, an atoll in Micronesia’s remote Caroline Islands.

 

PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS: VOYAGE OF THE HŌKŪLE‘A (1977)

Thursday, August 17, 9:00 pm

PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS:
VOYAGE OF THE HŌKŪLE‘A (1977)

Witness Hōkūle‘a’s inaugural 1976 journey from Hawai‘i to Tahiti, the preparations leading up to it, and the behind-the-scenes turmoil that threatened to derail the voyage. Rifts are seen among leadership, between leadership and the crew and among crew members. Co-produced by the National Geographic Society and WQED Pittsburgh.

 

PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS: PAPA MAU: THE WAYFINDER (2013)

Thursday, August 24, 9:00 pm

PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS:
PAPA MAU: THE WAYFINDER (2013)

Shortly after Hōkūle‘a was built in the 1970s, a search began for someone who could teach the art of navigation without modern instruments – native knowledge that had been all but lost. Master navigator Mau Piailug of Micronesia agreed to share what he knew. He played a critical role in Hōkūle‘a’s maiden voyage to Tahiti, and the rebirth of Polynesian unity and pride that followed. Produced by Palikū Documentary Films.

 

PACIFIC HEARTBEAT: VISIONS IN THE DARK: THE LIFE OF PINKY THOMPSON (2016)

Thursday, August 31, 9:00 pm

PACIFIC HEARTBEAT:
VISIONS IN THE DARK: THE LIFE OF PINKY THOMPSON (2016)

A serious eye wound sustained in Normandy during World War II left Myron “Pinky” Thompson in the dark for two years. From this, he emerged with a clear vision of his life’s purpose. Thompson left a palpable legacy as a social worker, mentor and leader in the Native Hawaiian community. In the late 1970s, Thompson served as Polynesian Voyaging Society’s President. Presented by Pacific Islanders in Communications.