Science

NOVA
Living with the Weather Machine

 

Join scientists on a quest to better understand the weather and climate machine we call Earth. Why do scientists overwhelmingly agree that our climate is changing, and how can we be resilient – even thrive – in the face of enormous change?

 

 

CIVILIZATIONS
How Do We Look?

 

Civilizations is a new nine-part series that examines human creativity across cultures. The PBS and BBC co-production, narrated by actor Liev Schreiber, tells the story of art from the dawn of human history to the
present day.

 

Inspired by Civilisation, Kenneth Clark’s acclaimed 1969 series about Western art, this epic new series expands the scope globally to reveal the role art and the creative imagination have played across multiple cultures and civilizations. Throughout the series, Civilizations travels across six continents to explore a wealth of treasures created through the entirety of the human experience. State-of-the-art drone and camera movement technology and macro-photography allow viewers to immerse themselves in new ways.

 

How Do We Look?
This episode explores the many functions of the human image in ancient art and the different ways each civilization and era regarded its significance.

 

 

FIRST CIVILIZATIONS
Part 1 of 4

 

Explore the seedbed civilizations of Mesoamerica, the Middle East and the Indus Valley to learn how and why early humans, who had been mobile foragers, created villages, towns, cities and states, establishing the blueprint for the modern world.

 

 

CIVILIZATIONS
The Second Moment of Creation

CIVILIZATIONS: The Second Moment of Creation

 

Civilizations is a new nine-part series that examines human creativity across cultures. The PBS and BBC co-production, narrated by actor Liev Schreiber, tells the story of art from the dawn of human history to the
present day.

 

Inspired by Civilisation, Kenneth Clark’s acclaimed 1969 series about Western art, this epic new series expands the scope globally to reveal the role art and the creative imagination have played across multiple cultures and civilizations. Throughout the series, Civilizations travels across six continents to explore a wealth of treasures created through the entirety of the human experience. State-of-the-art drone and camera movement technology and macro-photography allow viewers to immerse themselves in new ways.

 

The Second Moment of Creation charts the impulse of humans to express themselves creatively over tens of thousands of years, evolving from simple, abstract etchings to painted and sculpted depictions of the animal world and eventually the human form itself

 

 

NOVA
The Great Math Mystery

 

NOVA leads viewers on a mathematical mystery tour – a provocative exploration of math’s astonishing power across the centuries. We discover math’s signature in the swirl of a nautilus shell, the whirlpool of a galaxy and the spiral in the center of a sunflower. Math was essential to everything from the first wireless radio transmissions to the prediction and discovery of the Higgs boson and the successful landing of rovers on Mars. But where does math get its power? Astrophysicist and writer Mario Livio, along with a colorful cast of mathematicians, physicists and engineers, follows math from Pythagoras to Einstein and beyond, all leading to the riddle: Is math an invention or a discovery?

 

 

NOVA
Secrets of the Sky Tombs

 

A team of scientists and explorers probe high altitude caves in the Tibetan Himalayas. Along the way they discover evidence of ritual burials, thousands of years old: skeletons, mummies, and evidence of practices designed to ward off ancient vampires and even zombies.

 

 

A Front Row Seat to Myth-Busting

 

CEO Message

A Front Row Seat to Myth-Busting

 CEO Message: A Front Row Seat to Myth-Busting. Ornithologist Auguste von Bayern with a jackdaw
Ornithologist Auguste von Bayern, with a jackdaw, from the NOVA episode Bird Brain

 

Leslie Wilcox, PBS Hawai‘i President and CEO“What a bird brain!” “You’re a Neanderthal!” Not so long ago, these were taunts. But, thanks to recent research by scientists and the fine documentaries on PBS, we know better.

 

And I’m just the person to be thrilled by these discoveries. When I was a kid, my no-nonsense grandmother called me a bird brain every time I forgot my rubber slippers on our neighbors’ porch, which was often. And just last month, a 23andme.com ancestry test turned up Neanderthal DNA in my family.

 

When you sit back and view Nature or NOVA on Wednesday nights on PBS Hawai‘i, you sometimes have a front row seat to myth-busting. In vibrant video, you see that some of the ideas and conclusions printed in our old textbooks have been blown away.

 

As depicted in the recent NOVA episode Bird Brain, birds are far from empty-headed. They make great use of their small neuron-packed brains. They turn pebbles and sticks into tools; they plan multiple steps to solve problems; and some even “read” human faces. Put birds to the test with puzzles – and they can figure out when to defer a reward in order to snag a bigger one later.

 

In NOVA’s Decoding Neanderthals, we learned that these hominoids were not the brutish, knuckle-dragging simpletons we’d conjured. They were powerfully built, yes, but they also had large brains. They were adept at tool-making, and in fact, may have developed the first synthetic product, a type of glue. It was a very tough life in the Ice Age, and it’s unlikely that most Neanderthals lived past age 30.

 

Within the last decade, it’s been confirmed that Neanderthals interbred with their close cousins, homo sapiens. Many of us of European or Asian ancestry carry snippets of Neanderthal DNA. That’s just what my brother’s genetic test showed. In fact, he has more than the average amount.

 

A prevailing theory holds that our homo sapiens ancestors vanquished the Neanderthals. With the recent genetic evidence, another theory merits consideration: Through mating, the Neanderthals – with their smaller populations – were simply absorbed into homo sapiens life. Look for a brand-new PBS program about Neanderthals this month, Neanderthals: Meet Your Ancestors on Wednesday, February 28 at 9:00 pm. [Note: Since publication, PBS has announced that the program has been postponed until further notice.] I suspect there’ll be further re-branding of my ancient forebears.

 

We want to thank Dr. Belinda A. Aquino for generously sponsoring the broadcasts of both Nature and NOVA on PBS Hawai‘i. A retired University of Hawai‘i political science professor, Dr. Aquino is an internationally recognized authority on contemporary Philippine affairs. She tells me that she savors these programs about natural phenomena because they inspire new ways to think about humanity and the world around us.

 

And I’d like to thank you, too, for your support of PBS Hawai‘i’s role of adding new perspectives and context to our collective understanding of history and current affairs. Myth-busting is a byproduct!

 

Aloha nui,

 

Leslie signature

NOVA
First Face of America

NOVA: First Face of America

 

Take a risky dive into an underwater cave in Mexico to uncover the 13,000-year old skeleton of a prehistoric teenager. Forensic clues reveal intimate details of her life and death, and how her people first ventured into North America.

 

 

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