Sculpture

ART IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY
Los Angeles

 

This four-part series provides unparalleled access to some of the most innovative artists of our time, revealing how they engage with the culture around them and how art allows viewers to see the world in new ways. The featured artists are grouped by their unique and revealing relationships to the places where they live.

 

Los Angeles
Featured are: Diana Thater’s immersive video installations; Liz Larner’s experimental abstract sculptures; Tala Madani, who skewers stereotypes in satirical paintings; and Edgar Arceneaux, who examines history through drawing and performance.

 

 

 

ART IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY
Mexico City

 

ART IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY
This four-part series provides unparalleled access to some of the most innovative artists of our time, revealing how they engage with the culture around them and how art allows viewers to see the world in new ways. The featured artists are grouped by their unique and revealing relationships to the places where they live.

 

Mexico City
Featured are Damian Ortega, who makes sculptures from ordinary objects; Pedro Reyes, who designs solutions to social problems; Minerva Cuevas, who creates interventions in public space; and feature filmmaker Natalia Almada.

 

 

 

ART IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY
Chicago

 

ART IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY
This four-part series provides unparalleled access to some of the most innovative artists of our time, revealing how they engage with the culture around them and how art allows viewers to see the world in new ways. The featured artists are grouped by their unique and revealing relationships to the places where they live.

 

Chicago
Featured are Nick Cave, who creates wearable objects blending fashion and movement; sculptor and urban planner Theaster Gates; Barbara Kasten, who makes photographs and video projections; and cartoonist Chris Ware, a pioneer of the graphic novel.

 

 

 

Emery Blagdon and his Healing Machine

 

In an unheated shed near Stapleton, Nebraska in the late 1950s, visionary artist Emery Blagdon began twisting pieces of old wire into patterns with pliers, attaching aluminum foil, beads, ribbons and an infinite array of everyday cast-off items. His work became part of a unique environment that he created, believing it could generate natural energy from the earth and help people attain better health. Spurred on by personal tragedy, Blagdon’s obsession to create a “Healing Machine” was life-long as he believed people could be cured by his work.