Student News

HIKI NŌ 6|4|20:
HIKI NŌ 2020 Spring Challenge

 

This special episode features the winning stories from the HIKI NŌ 2020 Spring Challenge competition. In this year’s Spring Challenge, student teams from across the state were given four days to create a video portrait of a family that is sheltering at home together and how they are coping with life during the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

The winners in the High School Division are:

 

1st Place – Kapaʻa High School on Kauaʻi, for their story about a family that builds a makeshift bowling lane in their backyard in order to bond together during their time sheltering at home.

 

2nd Place – Maui High School in Kahului, for their story about how a daughter grows closer to her parents during the COVID-19 lockdown.

 

3rd Place – Roosevelt High School in Honolulu, for their story about a high school senior who becomes the primary caregiver to his 95-year-old great-grandmother during the shelter-at-home mandate.

 

Honorable Mention – Waipahu High School on Oʻahu, for their story about a grandmother who uses her professional sewing experience to make masks for her family.

 

The winners in the Middle School Division are:

 

1st Place – Maui Waena Intermediate School in Kahului, for their story about two sisters whose mother has lost her job due to the pandemic, leaving the father as the sole breadwinner in the household.

 

2nd Place – Kealakehe Intermediate School on Hawaiʻi Island, for their story about an only child who grows closer to her restaurant-owner parents when they spend more time at home with her due to the mandated restrictions on their business.

 

3rd Place – Kailua Intermediate School in Windward Oʻahu, for their story about a family that embraces the lost art of letter and card writing as a way of staying in touch with people while sheltering at home.

 

Honorable Mention – Waiʻanae Intermediate School, for their story about the stress a family undergoes adapting to major changes in their financial, professional and educational lives.

 

1st, 2nd, 3rd and Honorable Mention winners in both divisions will receive, respectively, $500, $300, $200 and $100 in production equipment or supplies for their school’s media program. All prizes are provided by State Farm®.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ 5|28|20:
Student Reflections on COVID-19, Part Four

 

HIKI NŌ continues its series of reflections on how COVID-19 has changed students’ lives as they shelter-in-place from their homes.

 

This episode includes the youngest Student Reflection correspondent—Dayvan Wong. Dayvan is a 5th grader at Waiākea Elementary School on Hawaiʻi Island. Dayvan bemoans the fact that sheltering at home gives him too much unstructured time. “After you finish doing homework you just have too much free time on your hands,” says Dayvan. “To me it’s like getting chocolate bars. One is okay, but too many drives you crazy.”

 

Other student correspondents who share their reflections in this episode include: Faʻamalosi Moeaʻi, a freshman at Hāna School in East Maui; Brayden Vierra-Hiromoto, a sophomore at Kalāheo High School in Windward Oʻahu; Terrysa Uyeno, an 8th grader at Waiʻanae Intermediate School in West Oʻahu; Emma Jane Roy, a 7th grader at ʻĪao School on Maui; and Matthew Nakamura, a senior at Trinity Christian School on Oʻahu.

 

Topics range from the lockdown providing the opportunity to bond with a younger sibling to the uncertainty of life in these unprecedented times to being home schooled.

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

Students from Kalani High School on Oʻahu tell the story of a young dancer/choreographer who has discovered her passion for teaching. Students from Moanalua Middle School on Oʻahu explore the need to develop a younger donor base for the Blood Bank. Students from Kalāheo High School on Oʻahu highlight a young HIKI NŌ reporter who gains valuable insight into the world of journalism by interviewing the CEO of PBS National Paula Kerger during her visit to PBS Hawaiʻi.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ 5|21|20:
Student Reflections on COVID-19, Part Three

 

HIKI NŌ continues its series of reflections on how COVID-19 has changed students’ lives as they shelter-in-place from their homes. Elijah Villaroz, a senior at Roosevelt High School on Oʻahu, recalls a revelation his mother shared with him: that he (Elijah) was born a few weeks before the September 11th attacks and that he is now graduating during the COVID-19 pandemic. For Elijah, the realization that he and his fellow high school seniors were born and spent their childhoods between the two great crises of this century was daunting.

 

Other student correspondents who share their reflections in this episode include: Ethan Morse, a junior at Farrington High School on Oʻahu; Amee Neves, a senior at Waiʻanae High School in West Oʻahu; Suzanne Tran, a senior at Moanalua High School on Oʻahu; Marlon Utrera Jr., a 7th grader at Kealakehe Intermediate School on Hawaiʻi Island; and Jack Wilcox, an 8th grader at Āliamanu Middle School on Oʻahu. Topics range from a theatre company devising ways to rehearse online to a young vlogger who creates humorous yet informative videos on COVID-19 to a middle school student who builds masks with his 3D printer.

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

Students from Konawaena High School on Hawaiʻi Island tell the story of Kimura’s Fabric Store, a family-owned business that is still going strong after almost one hundred years. Students from Kapaʻa High School on Kauaʻi tell the story of father and son cacao farmers. A student from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui shares his personal narrative about how human relationships make life worth living.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ 5|14|20:
Student Reflections on COVID-19, Part Two

 

HIKI NŌ continues its series of reflections on how COVID-19 has changed students’ lives as they shelter-in-place from their homes. Jimmy Liu, a junior and international student at Hawaiʻi Preparatory Academy on Hawaiʻi Island, recorded his reflection while sheltering in his home in Shanghai, China. He reports that the situation in his home city is much better now than it was during the peak of China’s coronavirus crisis and even shares footage of the streets of Shanghai today.

 

Other student correspondents who share their reflections in this episode include: Kailea Tuitele, an 8th grader at Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School; Anijah-Rose Tomacder, a senior at Kapaʻa High School on Kauaʻi; Paul Espiritu, a junior at Konawaena High School on Hawaiʻi Island; Isabella Rodriguez, a 6th grader at Ewa Makai Middle School on Oʻahu; and Naomi Toki, a senior at Waimea High School on Kauaʻi. Topics range from a student who takes on new responsibilities at home because her parents are essential workers to a father who does magic tricks to keep his children occupied during the lockdown to a student who takes care of his aunt’s children while she is out at her nursing job.

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

Students from Waiʻanae Intermediate School on Oʻahu tell the story of a robotics teacher who knew almost nothing about robotics when he took over the class but empowered his students to grow the program along with him; a student at H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui presents an expressionist personal narrative about her struggle with depression; and students from Moanalua High School on Oʻahu reveal the history and meaning behind lei-giving in a short documentary that won a Student Television Network Excellence Award.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ 5|7|20:
Student Reflections on COVID-19, Part One

 

HIKI NŌ Student Reflections on COVID-19, Part One

 

HIKI NŌ students from across the island chain present their reflections on how COVID-19 has changed their lives as they shelter-in-place from their homes. Topics touched upon in their reflections include: the angst felt by seniors missing out on traditional graduation ceremonies; concern for the health of grandparents; staying in touch with friends electronically; learning new skills while isolated at home; missing out on one’s big moment at Merrie Monarch; distance learning from home; working parents and the safety precautions they take upon arriving at home at the end of their workday.

 

The student correspondents who share their reflections in this episode include: Christine Alonzo, a senior at Maui High School in Kahului; Aaliyah Nero, an 8th grader at Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kauaʻi; Leiolani Faurot, a senior at Sacred Hearts Academy on Oʻahu; Skylar Masuda, a senior at H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui; Taylor McCann, a sophomore at Waiākea High School on Hawaiʻi Island; Sienna Jolie Racoma, an 8th grader at Maui Waena Intermediate School in Kahului; and Ty Kajihara, a freshman at Kauaʻi High School.

 

ALSO FEATURED

Some of the top stories from the Winter Quarter of the 2019/2020 school year: “Kitten Yoga” from Waiākea High School on Hawaiʻi Island; “4 Sisters Forever” from Waiʻanae High School in West Oʻahu; “Working Mom” from Farrington High School on Oʻahu; “Young Cartographer” from Hongwanji Mission School on Oʻahu; “Heart of Gold” from Moanalua High School on Oʻahu; and “Misfit Kempo Instructor” by Ewa Makai Middle School on Oʻahu.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ GIVES VOICE TO STUDENT INSIGHTS ON LIFE UNDER COVID-19

PBS HAWAI‘I – News Release

315 Sand Island Access Rd.| p: 808.462.5000| pbshawaii.org
Honolulu, HI 96819-2295| f: 808.462.5090

 

CONTACT

Jody Shiroma
PBS Hawaii
jshiroma@pbshawaii.org
808.462.5026

 

Download the Press Release

 

Tuesday, April 21, 2020

 

HIKI NŌ GIVES VOICE TO STUDENT INSIGHTS ON LIFE UNDER COVID-19

 

(HONOLULU, HI) — PBS Hawaiʻi’s statewide student news network HIKI NŌ is launching seven brand-new weekly episodes that feature Hawai`i-student reflections on their lives in the COVID-19 era.

 

The weekly episodes kicks off on Thursday, April 30th at 7:30 pm with the documentary, HIKI NŌ at STN 2020: Life Goes On. The program follows 13 HIKI NŌ school groups that traveled to Washington, D.C. to compete in the annual Student Television Network (STN) convention, only to find the convention cancelled the day before it was to commence due to COVID-19.

 

The documentary chronicles the students’ emotional progression from shock, disappointment, acceptance, resilience and a resolve to tell their stories regardless of the fact that they were no longer doing so for a competition.

 

The following week’s episode, premiering Thursday, May 7th at 7:30 pm, begins the series of weekly shows that feature students reflecting on life under COVID-19 directly into the camera, from the safety of their respective homes. Topics for these Student Reflections range from the impact the pandemic has had on student’s families, what they miss most from life before the pandemic, how they are compensating for that loss, to what gives them hope, and virtually any thoughts on how they feel about the “new normal.”

 

The series culminates in stories produced during the upcoming HIKI NŌ 2020 Spring Challenge, in which students will compete for prizes awarded to the best stories created during a set, four-day production window. The theme of the Challenge is COVID-19.

 

# # #

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ 4|30|20: HIKI NŌ at STN 2020: Life Goes On | Program

 

This special edition follows HIKI NŌ school groups that traveled to Washington D.C., in the second week of March to compete in the annual Student Television Network (STN) convention, only to find the convention cancelled the day before it was to commence due to restrictions on gatherings of over 1,000 people put into place by the city of Washington, D.C. These restrictions were put into place the day it was announced that the coronavirus outbreak had been deemed a pandemic. This documentary chronicles the students’ emotional progression from shock to severe disappointment to acceptance, resilience, and a resolve to tell their stories regardless of the fact that they were no longer doing so for a competition.

 

This is the first in a series of seven HIKI NŌ shows featuring student reflections on life in the COVID-19 era.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ 3|5|20: 2020 Winter Challenge High School Division | Program

 

This special edition features stories from the High School Division of the 2020 HIKI NŌ Winter Challenge. On January 31, 2020, participating elementary, middle school and high school teams were given four days to complete a HIKI NŌ story based on the prompt: “The wisdom of elders brought to life by the young.” Teachers could not provide hands-on help. The students had to conceptualize, research, arrange, shoot, write and edit their stories on their own. The completed stories were scored by members of the HIKI NŌ editorial board based on the following criteria:

 

1.) How well did the story capture the essence of the assigned theme?

2.) How well did the entry fulfill the HIKI NŌ Story Criteria (the criteria used throughout the school year to determine which stories are approved to air on HIKI NŌ)?

3.) How much did production values (the quality of the cinematography, editing and sound) contribute to the overall effectiveness of the story?

 

Based on the cumulative scores, First-Place, Second-Place, Third-Place, and Honorable Mention awards were given in both the middle school and high school divisions. The following High School Division awardees will be featured in this special:

 

–First Place in the High School Division:

 

“The Show Goes On”
The challenge team from Maui High School tells the story of a dance instructor whose love for the art form inspires generations of passionate dancers to continue the cycle of knowledge and inspiration.

 

HIKI NŌ 3|5|20: 2020 Winter Challenge High School Division | Program

 

–Second Place in the High School Division:

 

“Major Advice”
The challenge team from Waimea High School on Kauaʻi tells the story of a retired Army major who empowers generations of JROTC cadets to achieve their goals and become leaders by looking out for their welfare and teaching them hallmarks of success.

 

–Third Place in the High School Division:

 

“More Than Just a Language”
The challenge team from Hilo High School on the Big Island tells the story of a high school student who learned more than language and cultural traditions from her Hawaiian language class. Along with the special bond she formed with her teacher and class, she gained morals and values that she wishes to pass on to her younger brother and those after him.

 

–Honorable Mention in the High School Division:

 

”Intergenerational Practices”
The challenge team from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui tells the story of a Japanese folk dance teacher and a student whose passion for perpetuating the Japanese tradition makes his family and community members proud.

 

HIKI NŌ Winter Challenge stories from Moanalua High School on Oʻahu and Kauaʻi High School are also featured.

 

“No Cost for Kindness”
The challenge team from Moanalua High School on Oʻahu tells the story of a student who learned respect and kindness at home and practices these lessons at school by helping kids in need.

 

“Mālama Huleʻia: Preserving the Past”
The challenge team from Kauaʻi High School tells the story of a non-profit organization that relies on the wisdom and traditions of elders to connect with the past, revitalize Hawaiian lands, and teach the community youth to take care of the environment for years to come.

 

First-place winners will receive $500 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program. Second-place winners will receive $300 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program. Third-place winners will receive $200 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program. Honorable mention winners will receive $100 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ 2|27|20:
2020 Winter Challenge Middle School Division | Program

 

This special edition features stories from the Middle School division of the 2020 HIKI NŌ Winter Challenge.  On January 31, 2020, participating elementary, middle school and high school teams were given four days to complete a HIKI NŌ story based on the prompt: “The wisdom of elders brought to life by the young.”   Teachers could not provide hands-on help.  The students had to conceptualize, research, arrange, shoot, write and edit their stories on their own.  The completed stories were scored by members of the HIKI NŌ editorial board based on the following criteria:

 

1.) How well did the story capture the essence of the assigned theme?
 
2.) How well did the entry fulfill the HIKI NŌ Story Criteria (the criteria used throughout the school year to determine which stories are approved to air on HIKI NŌ)?
 
3.) How much did production values (the quality of the cinematography, editing and sound) contribute to the overall effectiveness of the story?

 

Based on the cumulative scores, First-Place, Second-Place, Third-Place, and Honorable Mention awards were given in both the middle school and high school divisions. The following Middle School Division awardees will be featured in this special:

 

–First Place in the Middle School Division:

 

“Misfit Martial Arts Instructor”
The challenge team from ʻEwa Makai Middle School on Oʻahu tells the story of a martial arts instructor who passes down to his students life lessons he’s learned during his rocky youth.

 

–Second Place in the Middle School Division:

 

“Piano Teacher”
The challenge team from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School tells the story ofa grandmother who has taught piano to two generations of her family, as well as scores of other Maui residents.

 

–Third Place in the Middle School Division:

 

“Coach Jensen”
The challenge team from Waiākea Elementary School on Hawaiʻi Island tells the story of a baseball stand-out who, because of his short stature, channeled his passion for the sport from playing to coaching.  Because there is not a separate elementary school division for HIKI NŌ challenges, elementary schools compete in the Middle School Division.  This is the first time an elementary school has placed in a HIKI NŌ Challenge.

 

–Honorable Mention in the Middle School Division:

 

”Ongaeshi: Giving Back”

 

The challenge team from Highlands Intermediate School on Oʻahu tells the story of a judo sensei who is passing his knowledge of this form of martial art to his children.

 

HIKI NŌ Winter Challenge stories from Maui Waena Intermediate School on Maui,Kealakehe Intermediate School in Kona, and Kapaʻa Middle School on Kauaʻi are also featured.

 

First-place winners will receive $500 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program.  Second-place winners will receive $300 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program.  Third-place winners will receive $200 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ 2|20|20:
John Rao and Other Stories | Program

 

TOP STORY

 

“John Rao”
Students from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on the island of Kauaʻi tell the story of a man who slowly turned his life around as the result of a spiritual awakening.

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

“Young Cartographer”
Students from Hongwanji Mission School in Nuʻuanu Valley on Oʻahu tell the story of a young cartographer who creates imaginative worlds through hand-drawn maps.

 

“How to Make Jewelry from Magazines”
Students from Roosevelt High School on Oʻahu show us a crafty way of making bracelets from old magazines.

 

“Vibrant Hawaiʻi”
Students from Waiākea Elementary School on the Big Island tell the story of a financially struggling, single mother and a visionary community movement that hopes to solve the island’s poverty epidemic.

 

“Hygiene Products for the Homeless”
Students from Aliamanu Middle School on the island of Oʻahu tell the story of middle school students who organized a hygiene drive to help address a prevalent health issue affecting the homeless.

 

“Chef to the Homeless”
Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School in Pukalani tell the story of a chef whose compassion for the disadvantaged led him to work at a homeless shelter.

 

Students from Ewa Makai Middle School host this episode of HIKI NŌ from their campus in Ewa Beach, Oʻahu.

 

 

 

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