Student News

HIKI NŌ 12|5|19: 2019-2020 Student Television Network Challenge

 

This special edition features stories created by HIKI NŌ students that were submitted to the national Student Television Network (STN) competition in the News Feature category.  Participating student teams were given six days to conceptualize, organize, shoot, write and edit a story based on a particular theme, which was not announced until the beginning of the six-day production window.  The theme for this challenge was: Role Models.

 

TOP STORY

 

“For You”
Students from Waiʻanae High School in West Oʻahu tell the story of Lexton Butay-Joseph, a Waiʻanae High School senior whose uncle and role model passed away under tragic circumstances.  Lexton had never been close with his father, but through their shared grief over Lextonʻs uncle (his fatherʻs brother), a bond between father and son has been forged.

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

“Young Champion”
Students from Waiʻanae Intermediate School in West Oʻahu tell the story of Logyn Lynn Puahala, a nine-year-old female judo champion who serves as a role model to her best friend and fellow judo student Eli Oshiro.  The story also features Logynʻs judo coach and role model, her father Robin Puahala.

 

“Period Hawaiʻi”
Students from Moanalua High School on Oʻahu tell the story of Courtney Coleman, the lead organizer of Period Hawaiʻi.  Courtney was inspired to take on this position by Nadya Okimoto, the founder of the national Period Movement. Period Hawaiʻi fights for access to menstrual hygiene products for all Hawaiʻi women (whether they be homeless, incarcerated or otherwise unable to afford the products).

 

“Uncle Russell”
Students from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kauaʻi tell the story of a Kauaʻi man who has become a role model to many because of his volunteer work for the Foodbank and for teaching water sports to handicapped children and adults.

 

“Mana Wahine”
Students from ʻEwa Makai Middle School on Oʻahu tell the story of Alexis Akiona, a young fashion designer who looks to her mother as her role model.  Alexis credits her mother for teaching her how to be a strong woman, or mana wahine.

 

“Role Model Teacher/Dad”
Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School in Pukalani tell the story of an elementary school teacher who straddles his dual life as a role model for his students and for his offspring.

 

“Homecoming”
Students from Maui High School in Kahului tell the story of a young woman who was once trapped in the foster care system and is now paying it forward by helping children who are going through the same hardship.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
HIKI NŌ Class of 2019, Part Three

 

This is the third of four specials in which outstanding HIKI NŌ graduates from the Class of 2019 (and one student from the Class of 2020) gathered at PBS Hawaiʻi to discuss their HIKI NŌ experiences and how they feel the skills they learned from HIKI NŌ will help them in college, the workplace and life.

 

This episode features Carl Antiado, who graduated from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui and is now a Computer Science and Engineering major at the University of Nevada Reno; Kobie Uyeda, who graduated from Waiākea High School in Hilo and is now a Kinesiology Pre-Med major at Oregon State University; and Brandon Marcos, who graduated from Kauaʻi High School on Kauaʻi and is now majoring in Computer Science at UH Mānoa

 

Each graduate also shows a HIKI NŌ story that they worked on and discusses what they learned from the experience of working on that particular story. Carl shows his story about a band teacher he had who inspired Carl and turned him onto a new perspective on life. Kobie shares her story “Stay Humble, Pray,” about an ex-convict/drug addict who speaks to students about how to avoid bad life choices. Brandon presents his story “Kapaʻa Gridlock,” an investigation into why traffic is so heavy on Kauaʻi.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ 11|21|19:
2019 Fall Challenge

 

This special edition features stories from the 2019 HIKI NŌ Fall Challenge.  On October 18, 2019, participating elementary, middle school and high school teams were given four days to complete a HIKI NŌ story based on the prompt: “Half of Hawaiʻi’s people are struggling financially even while many work two or three jobs.  Produce a story about a person or group of people who are dealing with this predicament.”   Teachers could not provide hands-on help.  The students had to conceptualize, research, arrange, shoot, write and edit their stories on their own.  The completed stories were scored by members of the HIKI NŌ editorial board based on the following criteria:

 

1.) How well did the story capture the essence of the assigned theme?

2.) How well did the entry fulfill the HIKI NŌ Story Criteria (the criteria used throughout the school year to determine which stories are approved to air on HIKI NŌ)?

3.) How much did production values (the quality of the cinematography, editing and sound) contribute to the overall effectiveness of the story?

 

Based on the cumulative scores, first-place, second-place and third-place awards were given in both the middle school and high school divisions. The following awardees will be featured in the special:

 

First Place in the High School Division:

“Chazz’s World”

The challenge team from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui tells the story of Chazz—a high school student who has to work at a pizza parlor to help his family pay the bills.  The story explores the stress and other emotional hardships the situation causes for Chazz.

 

First Place in the Middle School Division:

“Working for Love”

The challenge team from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School tells the story of a wife and husband who are both full-time teachers yet have to work additional jobs in order to make ends meet. (She cleans condos and he runs a yard service.)

 

Second Place in the High School Division:

“For the Family”

The challenge team from Moanalua High School on Oʻahu tells the story of a woman who lost her husband to leukemia and must now raise her daughters as a single mother.

 

Second Place in the Middle School Division:

“Hero Mom”

The challenge team from Maui Waena Intermediate School tells the story of a woman who holds down three jobs to support her family and whose dedication and sacrifice has made her a hero in her daughter’s eyes.

 

Third Place in the High School Division:

“Handling Hawaiʻi’s Financial Demands”

The challenge team from Kapaʻa High School on Kauaʻi tells the story of two young people who perform in a Polynesian revue but also hold down additional jobs to make ends meet.

 

Third Place in the Middle School Division:

“Go Jimmy Go”

The challenge team from Highlands Intermediate School on Oʻahu tells the story of a saxophone player who heads a very successful, nationally touring musical group but who also teaches at Highlands Intermediate to earn enough money to support his family.

 

First-place winners will receive $500 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program.  Second-place winners will receive $300 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program.  Third-place winners will receive $200 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ 11|14|19:
The Effects of Deployment on Families and Other Stories

 

TOP STORY

 

“The Effects of Deployment on Families”
Students from Aliamanu Middle School in the Salt Lake district of Oʻahu explore the effects of military deployment on family members. The story focuses on how the impact of a parent’s deployment can be more problematic for younger children than it is with their older siblings.

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

“Shy Girl”
Students from Hilo High School on Hawaiʻi Island tell the story of a severely shy female Hilo High student who came out of her shell after she found her niche in her schoolʻs media club.

 

“Miss Filipina Kauaʻi”
Kauaʻi High School Class of 2019 graduate Tiffany Sagucio gives a first-person account of her experience as a contestant in the 2019 Miss Filipina Kauaʻi Pageant. Tiffany produced this story as part of her Gwen Ifill Fellowship for young journalists, named after the iconic PBS NewsHour anchor who passed away from cancer in 2016.

 

“Raised Crosswalks”
Students from Waiʻanae High School in West Oʻahu tell the story of a new pedestrian protection measure launched on Farrington Highway in Waiʻanae—raised crosswalks.

 

“Fishing Line Recycling”
Students from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui report on an effort to reduce the amount of harmful fishing line discarded into our oceans.

 

“Poi Mill”
Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School show us how Native Hawaiian students are learning about their culture through the cultivation and presentation of taro.

 

“Kinai ʻEha”
Students at Kalāheo High School in Windward Oʻahu introduce us to a non-profit organization that provides workforce training for young people who are homeless, incarcerated or just looking for guidance.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ 11|7|19:
A Second Chance and other stories

 

TOP STORY

“A Second Chance”
Students from Waiākea High School in the Hilo district of Hawaiʻi
Island tell the story of Easten Tanimoto, a young man who, under the influence of psilocybin (hallucinogenic mushrooms), climbed a telephone pole, was electrocuted, then fell to the ground, sustaining serious injuries and severe burns. After a miraculous recovery, Tanimoto has dedicated his life to speaking at schools and inspiring students to make better life choices.

 

ALSO FEATURED

“Veterans Mural”
Students from Maui High School in Kahului tell the story of a mural artist who forges a special connection with the war veterans from his community.

 

“Baseball Dad”
Students from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on the Garden Isle tell the story of a Kauaʻi man who raised two sons that became major league baseball players.

 

“Plastic Pollution”
Students from Maui Waena Intermediate School in Kahului tell the story of Maui volunteers who are working to reduce plastic pollution in our oceans and on our beaches.

 

“Recycled Plastic Hale”
Students from Island School on Kauaʻi tell the story of the first building in the state to be built with blocks made of plastic waste.

 

“How to Make a Parol”
Students from Kalākaua Middle School on Oʻahu show us how to make a traditional Filipino Christmas decoration.

 

“Kapa Maker”
Students at Kalama Intermediate School on Maui introduce us to a master practitioner of a traditional Hawaiian form of textile-making.

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by students from Molokaʻi High School.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ 10|31|19:
Kauaʻi Resilience Project and Other Stories

 

TOP STORY

 

“Kauaʻi Resilience Project”
Students from Kapaʻa High School on Kauaʻi tell the story of their community’s effort to address a serious problem with Kauaʻi’s youth. A 2018 study showed that 9% of high school students on Kauaʻi attempt suicide, and 28% reported feeling sad and worthless over extended periods of time. In response to these alarming facts, the Kauaʻi Resiliency Project was formed to create programs and opportunities for Kauaʻi’s youth that help them navigate life’s challenges.

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

“Taiko for the Deaf”
In their HIKI NŌ debut, students from Hawaiʻi Baptist Academy in the Nuʻuanu district of Oʻahu tell the story of a taiko drumming class for the deaf held by the Taiko Center of the Pacific. The deaf students learn to drum through visual cues such as watching the person in front of them and through instructions from a sign language interpreter. Although they cannot hear the drums, they can feel the vibration of the drum beats through their bodies. They don’t consider their deafness as a limitation to taiko drumming and, as a result, their confidence and self-esteem are lifted through this activity.

 

“Martin Charlot”
Students from Konawaena High School on Hawaiʻi Island follow veteran painter Martin Charlot (son of legendary artist Jean Charlot) as he restores a mural he created 46 years ago for what is now called the Ellison Onizuka Gymnasium at Konawaena High School.

 

“Fire Knife Dancer”
Students from Kealakehe Intermediate School on Hawaiʻi Island tell the story of a fire knife dancer who is passing along this traditional Samoan art form to the next generation.

 

“Hawaiʻi Nature Center”
Students from McKinley High School on Oʻahu tell the story of a special place in Honolulu that connects family and children to nature: the Hawaiʻi Nature Center.

 

“Street Art Hawaiʻi”
Students from Sacred Hearts Academy on Oʻahu tell the story of a team of local artists who are beautifying the Kaimukī neighborhood of Honolulu with their colorful street paintings.

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ also features a behind-the-scenes look at the 2019 HIKI NŌ Statewide Teachers Workshop.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ 10|24|19:
Archers to Art and Other Stories

 

TOP STORY:

 

“Archers to Art”
Students from Ke Kula Niihau O Kekaha Public Charter School on Kauaʻi tell the story of how members of their school’s archery program created, through a process of problem solving, an activity that produces wildly colorful, spontaneous works of art. Student archers decided to place balloons onto the traditional archery targets with the intent of having the arrows burst the balloons. The wind caused the balloons to move around, so the students filled them with water to anchor them in place. They then decided to add paint to the water, and laid cardboard down to avoid messing up the surrounding area. Noticing the colorful designs the splatters created, they replaced the cardboard with watercolor paper. Thus was created this innovative genre of painting.

 

ALSO FEATURED:

 

“Waimea’s Rain Rock”
Students from Hawaiʻi Preparatory Academy Middle School in the Waimea district of Hawaiʻi Island tell the story of a legendary rain rock which was said to have saved Waimea from a devastating drought.

 

“Student Poet”
Students from Kauaʻi High School in Līhuʻe tell the story of a young poet who uses creativity to battle depression.

 

“Jiu Jitsu Preacher”
Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School in Pukalani tell the story of a martial arts school that is also a place of worship.

 

“How to Care for an Abandoned Baby Bird”
Students from Īʻao School on Maui show us how to nurse an abandoned baby bird back to health.

 

“Betty Santoki”
Students from Farrington High School on Oʻahu introduce us to a Class of 1962 Farrington graduate who has dedicated her life to keeping Japanese traditions alive in her community.

 

“Suburbia”
A student at H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui shares her inner-most thoughts about becoming a filmmaker in a personal video essay.

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by students at Montessori School of Maui in Makawao.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
HIKI NŌ Class of 2019 & 2020

 

This is the final episode in a series of four specials in which outstanding HIKI NŌ graduates from the Class of 2019 (and one student from the Class of 2020) gathered at PBS Hawaiʻi to discuss their HIKI NŌ experiences and how they feel the skills they learned from HIKI NŌ will help them in college, the workplace and life.

 

This episode features Christine Alonzo, who is now a HIKI NŌ student in her senior year at Maui High School; Julia Forrest, who graduated from Waiʻanae High School on Oʻahu and is now a Public Policy major at the University of Michigan; and Tiffany Sagucio, who graduated from Kauaʻi High School and is now majoring in Communications at UH Mānoa.

 

Each student also shows a HIKI NŌ story that they worked on and discusses what they learned from the experience of working on that particular story. Christine shares her story, “Kuleana,” about the making of the independent feature film Kuleana by a Maui resident and a tight-knit local film community. Julia shows her story “Naked Cow Dairy,” about the last dairy farm on Oʻahu. Tiffany presents her story, “A Special Piece,” — a personal video essay about appreciating home on the threshold of going away to college.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
HIKI NŌ Class of 2019, Part Two

 

This is the second of four specials in which outstanding HIKI NŌ graduates from the Class of 2019 (and one student from the Class of 2020) gathered at PBS Hawaiʻi to discuss their HIKI NŌ experiences and how they feel the skills they learned from HIKI NŌ will help them in college, the workplace and life.

 

This episode features Kera Rasavanh, who graduated from McKinley High School in Honolulu and is now a Business Marketing and Digital Cinema major at UH Mānoa; Drake Dela Cruz, who graduated from Farrington High School in Honolulu and is now a Film and TV Production major at Leeward Community College on Oʻahu; and Serene Morales, who graduated from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui and is now majoring in Digital Cinema at UH Mānoa.

 

Each graduate also shows a HIKI NŌ story that they worked on and discusses what they learned from the experience of working on that particular story. Kera shares her story “Hawaii Nature Center,” about an ʻāina-based education center in Makiki, Oʻahu that teaches elementary and middle school children how to care for the environment. Drake shows “Betty Santoki,” about a 1962 Farrington graduate who has dedicated her life to keeping Japanese culture alive in her community. Serene presents her story “Justin Yanagida,” about a Maui-based fitness coach who uses struggles from his own past to motivate others to turn their lives around.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
HIKI NŌ Class of 2019, Part One

 

This is the first of four specials in which outstanding HIKI NŌ graduates from the Class of 2019 (and one student from the Class of 2020) gathered at PBS Hawaiʻi to discuss their HIKI NŌ experiences and how they feel the skills they learned from HIKI NŌ will help them in college, the workplace and life.

 

Part One features Emily Tsuji, who graduated from Waiākea High School in Hilo and is now a freshman at Cal State Long Beach; Rebecca Meyer, who graduated from Sacred Hearts Academy on Oʻahu and is now majoring in Communications at Creighton University in Nebraska; and Selwyn Madarang, who graduated from Farrington High School on Oʻahu and is now majoring in Digital Media Video for Web at Leeward Community College.

 

Each graduate shows a HIKI NŌ story that they worked on and discusses what they learned from the experience of working on that particular story. Emily shares her story “Foster Care” about a married couple who dedicate their professional and personal lives to the care of foster children. Selwyn shows “Feeding the Little Leaguers” about the 2018 Little League World Series Champions from Hawaiʻi and the importance they placed on local food for staying connected to home while on the road. Rebecca shares her story “Ride Share” on the controversial issue of whether or not minors should be allowed to use ride-sharing services like Uber on their own.

 

 

 

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