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Opera Reimagined:
Animating The Cunning Little Vixen

Opera Reimagined: Animating the Cunning Little Vixen

 

In 2014, The Cleveland Orchestra staged a unique production of Leoš Janáĉek’s The Cunning Little Vixen that blended traditional opera with technology and animation. OPERA REIMAGINED: ANIMATING THE CUNNING LITTLE VIXEN follows the journey of this innovative approach to opera from conception to tech rehearsals and, finally, to opening night. Through rehearsal footage, production meetings, and interviews with director Yuval Sharon, Cleveland Orchestra music director Franz Welser-Möst, animators at Walter Robot, and others, the half-hour documentary reveals how the opera comes together piece-by-piece, providing a fascinating view of all the creative elements featured in this unique performance.

 

Preview

 

 

 

CIVILIZATIONS
What is Art (Good For)?

 

Explore art in the age of revolution, war and profound scientific change to consider the question: Should art create a separate realm, a place of escape, or should it plunge into the chaos, transforming the way we see and live in the world?

 

 

A CRAFTSMAN’S LEGACY
The Glassblower

 

Host Eric Gorges visits a friend, April Wagner, a glassblower working in abstract art. Eric and April discuss the connection between making a sacrifice when starting up a business and the give-and-take that successful craft people must make and the rewards that eventually come. Eric learns how hot a glass studio can get and how to make a glass cup.

 

THE STORY OF WOMEN AND ART
Parts 1 – 3

 

In this three-part series, Professor Amanda Vickery explores the story of female creativity through the ages with a fascinating art history tour from the Renaissance to the 20th century. Vickery shows how a familiarity with female artistry helps us to understand the ways societal attitudes toward women and their artistic endeavors have evolved throughout the years.

 

Part 1 of 3
Sat., April 9, 8:00 pm

 

Professor Vickery begins her journey in Florence, cradle of the Renaissance. This was a world where women’s private lives and creativity were well hidden behind closed doors. Vickery encounters intrepid art historians who, as they have discovered long-forgotten works in basements, storeroom and convents, also uncover the incredible stories of female artists who fulfilled their artistic ambitions, despite myriad social constraints placed upon them. Leaving the opulence and excess of Catholicism behind, Vickery heads north, discovering how the Protestant Reformation created a very different artistic landscape.

 

Part 2 of 3
Sat., April 9, 9:00 pm

 
Professor Vickery turns the spotlight on Britain – a new world leader in innovation, manufacturing and commerce, and France – home to the finest and most extravagant court of the 18th century. It’s a world defined by male artists like Joshua Reynolds and Thomas Gainsborough. Yet this was a world shaped, styled and designed by women. Much of the art produced by women had the status of “amateur” – a word that had yet to acquire the negative connotations it holds today.

 

Part 3 of 3
Sat., April 9, 10:00 pm

 

Professor Vickery explores the explosion of creative opportunities seized by women from the mid-19th to the mid-20th century. At a time when women were beginning to demand greater social and economic freedoms and boldly forge independent paths, female creativity would not only triumph in traditionally male-dominated artistic arenas but redefine the very notion of what art could be. One artist, in particular, forged the most unconventional of paths while using conventional mediums: Georgia O’Keefe. O’Keefe founded an artistic movement from her New Mexico retreat, proving that with courage and talent women could be recognized as world class artists.