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KĀKOU – Hawai‘i’s Town Hall
The Future of Work

KĀKOU – Hawai‘i's Town Hall: The Future of Work

 

Will you be employable? Will your children?

Conversations about the future and the kind of world our children and their children will inherit from us include familiar concerns and well-defined subjects: The National Debt. Environmental Destruction. Climate Change. Sustainability. But there’s another conversation that needs to happen. Although the workplace has changed throughout the decades, none of us can fully grasp the kind of transformational change that lies ahead. How we work. Where we work. And the skills we need for work will change work – as we know it today – forever.

 

The FUTURE OF WORK is the topic for the next live KĀKOU – Hawai‘i’s Town Hall – Thursday, October 25 from 8:00 – 10:00 pm. Representatives from government, labor and the education and business communities will be joined by workers, parents and students for a community conversation about what is referred to as the Fourth Industrial Revolution and the impact it is creating on local economies and employment landscapes – including Hawai‘i’s. Are we preparing our children for a future where disruptive technology will transform the workplace and much of the way we live?

 

What will life in Hawai‘i be like 10, 20 and 30 years from now when technology is firmly embedded and in most cases dominating the workplace? Could this be a positive opportunity to diversify Hawai‘i’s economy and job landscape? How do we prepare future generations for WORK 4.0?

 

 

 


<< Return to the KĀKOU home page.

 

 

THE CROWD & THE CLOUD
Viral vs. Virus

 

Sensors on asthma inhalers generate real-time maps of environmental dangers to help patients, physicians and disease detectives in Louisville, Kentucky. Street knowledge was also crucial in a historic medical breakthrough: John Snow’s mapping of cholera fatalities in 19th century London. In West Oakland, California, citizens confront air pollution and rising asthma rates by collecting traffic data. Local ordinances are changed and everyone breathes easier.

 

Can apps and maps combat globalized diseases in a warming world? Stories of citizen science fighting mosquito-borne diseases with apps and crowd-sourced data in Barcelona, Houston and New Orleans. In Kenya, Medic Mobile develops smart but low-cost software to give simple phones powerful capabilities to help community health workers improve maternal and child health.

 

Hosted by former NASA Chief Scientist Waleed Abdalati, “The Crowd & The Cloud” takes viewers on a global tour of the projects and people on the front lines of citizen science and crowdsourcing.

 

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
The Right of Access

 

More than 50 years ago, under Chief Justice William S. Richardson, the Supreme Court of the State of Hawai‘i ruled the public had the right to access all beaches throughout our State. But for decades there have been disputes — clashes throughout the islands — involving access pathways that lead to our beaches.

 

What do you think? Is is time we settled this “right of access” dispute linked to one of the most historically significant rulings in our history?

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 


INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
Will visiting our most popular places soon be the toughest ticket in town?

 

As a tourist destination, Hawai`i continues to set new records for visitor arrivals, creating greater demand by millions of people seeking access to the famous, iconic sites throughout our islands.

 

Next month the National Park Service will follow Hanauma Bay State Park and the USS Arizona Memorial by limiting access to the spectacular sunrise at Haleakala, citing safety and environmental concerns.

 

“This date sold out.” “No reservations available.” Will visiting our most popular places soon be the toughest ticket in town?

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 


PBS Hawai‘i Passport

PBS Hawaii Passport, your new member benefit
PBS Hawaii Passport, you new member benefit.

 

Introducing a new benefit to PBS Hawai‘i supporters that provides extended on-demand access to quality PBS programming.

 

Quality shows. On your schedule.

PBS Hawai‘i Passport is an added benefit for valued donors of public television.

With PBS Hawai‘i Passport, you can enjoy past episodes of many of your favorite PBS and PBS Hawai‘i shows on demand using your computer, smartphone or tablet. More platforms and devices are coming soon!

 

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The Human Face of Big Data

 

During the first day of a baby’s life the amount of data generated by humanity is equivalent to 70 times the information contained in the Library of Congress. What will it mean to live in a world where every moment, from birth to death, is digitally chronicled and preserved in vast cloud-based databases, forever? This film captures the promise and potential peril of the extraordinary knowledge revolution.