access

The Mission of Reaching Far and Deep

 

CEO Message

 

Leslie Wilcox, PBS Hawai‘i President and CEOThe theme of human connection ran alongside the subject of digital media strategies at the PBS Annual Meeting last month in Nashville, Tennessee. Which felt just right. What we strive to do in public media is combine the power of touch and the reach of tech to serve our home states.

 

Why meet in Nashville? Because PBS representatives from around the country need to meet somewhere – and Music City was a great setting for renowned filmmaker Ken Burns to share his newest epic, Country Music.

 

He spoke in a hotel ballroom two blocks from a boulevard of windows-thrown-open, live-music honky tonks. The eight-part, 16-hour film premieres on PBS stations nationally on Sunday, September 15.

 

At the conference, Burns said the film isn’t only for country music fans. At the heart of this American art form are honesty, vulnerability and real life. It’s about the joy of love and family, the hurt of betrayal, loneliness, regret, resilience, toil, faith, independence and the lure of the open road.

 

The Mission of Reaching Far and Deep

Leslie at Nashville conference with national PBS figures (right to left)
news anchor Judy Woodruff, commentator David Brooks and
(far left) arts adviser Jane Chu

 

I had the privilege of taking part in a discussion on stage with heavy hitters: (right to left) PBS NewsHour anchor and managing editor Judy Woodruff; NY Times Op-Ed columnist/PBS NewsHour commentator/author David Brooks and (far left) PBS Arts Adviser Jane Chu. We looked at how the arts reach deep within people and we considered Brooks’ proposition that the neighborhood, not the individual, is the essential unit of social change. And we talked about using local knowledge to determine the best ways to convene and authentically engage communities of diverse voices.

 

Just as there’s no quick fix for the broken heart in a country song, there’s no manual for success in the rapidly changing media industry. The spinning evolution of tech choices, viewer options and fragmented audiences requires media makers to be agile and relentlessly purposeful – and that still doesn’t assure success.

 

Here’s an industry expectation that’s a safe bet: In three years or less there will be as many digital screens as live TV screens being used to view programming.

 

PBS KIDS viewing is already there. Digital screens dominate in front of young children, who also use them to play PBS educational video games.

 

Back from Nashville, our local team knows that we need more than quality programming going for PBS Hawaiʻi; we need to offer easy availability. You as a viewer want to be able to watch what you want – when and where you want it. Our Passport streaming service and our website on-demand programs are a start.

 

If PBS Hawaiʻi’s digital strategy goals were a country music song, the title would be “I’ll Go Anywhere With You.”

 

Aloha Nui,

Leslie signature


 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI:
Ala Moana Park Plan

 

Ala Moana Regional Park on Oʻahu’s south shore is a beloved playground for local residents, with access to surfing, swimming, paddleboarding, tennis, walking and picnicking. The city of Honolulu has a master plan to revitalize the park. Not everyone agrees with the plan’s vision. Join our discussion on the Ala Moana Park Plan on the next INSIGHTSON PBS HAWAIʻI.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
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Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

 

 

INDEPENDENT LENS
The Providers

INDEPENDENT LENS: The Providers

 

Set against the backdrop of the physician shortage and opioid epidemic in rural America, The Providers follows three healthcare providers in northern New Mexico. They work at El Centro, a group of safety-net clinics that offer care to all who walk through the doors. Amidst personal struggles that reflect those of their patients, the journeys of the providers unfold as they work to reach rural Americans who would otherwise be left out of the healthcare system. With intimate access, the documentary shows the transformative power of providers’ relationships with underserved patients.

 

Preview

 

 

 

KĀKOU – Hawai‘i’s Town Hall
The Future of Work

Program

 

Will you be employable? Will your children?

Conversations about the future and the kind of world our children and their children will inherit from us include familiar concerns and well-defined subjects: The National Debt. Environmental Destruction. Climate Change. Sustainability. But there’s another conversation that needs to happen. Although the workplace has changed throughout the decades, none of us can fully grasp the kind of transformational change that lies ahead. How we work. Where we work. And the skills we need for work will change work – as we know it today – forever.

 
Preview opening clip: Growth Tribe

 

The FUTURE OF WORK is the topic for the next live KĀKOU – Hawai‘i’s Town Hall – Thursday, October 25 from 8:00 – 10:00 pm. Representatives from government, labor and the education and business communities will be joined by workers, parents and students for a community conversation about what is referred to as the Fourth Industrial Revolution and the impact it is creating on local economies and employment landscapes – including Hawai‘i’s. Are we preparing our children for a future where disruptive technology will transform the workplace and much of the way we live?

 

What will life in Hawai‘i be like 10, 20 and 30 years from now when technology is firmly embedded and in most cases dominating the workplace? Could this be a positive opportunity to diversify Hawai‘i’s economy and job landscape? How do we prepare future generations for WORK 4.0?

 

 


<< Return to the KĀKOU home page.

 

 

THE CROWD & THE CLOUD
Viral vs. Virus

 

Sensors on asthma inhalers generate real-time maps of environmental dangers to help patients, physicians and disease detectives in Louisville, Kentucky. Street knowledge was also crucial in a historic medical breakthrough: John Snow’s mapping of cholera fatalities in 19th century London. In West Oakland, California, citizens confront air pollution and rising asthma rates by collecting traffic data. Local ordinances are changed and everyone breathes easier.

 

Can apps and maps combat globalized diseases in a warming world? Stories of citizen science fighting mosquito-borne diseases with apps and crowd-sourced data in Barcelona, Houston and New Orleans. In Kenya, Medic Mobile develops smart but low-cost software to give simple phones powerful capabilities to help community health workers improve maternal and child health.

 

Hosted by former NASA Chief Scientist Waleed Abdalati, “The Crowd & The Cloud” takes viewers on a global tour of the projects and people on the front lines of citizen science and crowdsourcing.

 

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
The Right of Access

 

More than 50 years ago, under Chief Justice William S. Richardson, the Supreme Court of the State of Hawai‘i ruled the public had the right to access all beaches throughout our State. But for decades there have been disputes — clashes throughout the islands — involving access pathways that lead to our beaches.

 

What do you think? Is is time we settled this “right of access” dispute linked to one of the most historically significant rulings in our history?

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 


INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
Will visiting our most popular places soon be the toughest ticket in town?

 

As a tourist destination, Hawai`i continues to set new records for visitor arrivals, creating greater demand by millions of people seeking access to the famous, iconic sites throughout our islands.

 

Next month the National Park Service will follow Hanauma Bay State Park and the USS Arizona Memorial by limiting access to the spectacular sunrise at Haleakala, citing safety and environmental concerns.

 

“This date sold out.” “No reservations available.” Will visiting our most popular places soon be the toughest ticket in town?

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 


PBS Hawai‘i Passport

PBS Hawaii Passport, your new member benefit
PBS Hawaii Passport, you new member benefit.

 

Introducing a new benefit to PBS Hawai‘i supporters that provides extended on-demand access to quality PBS programming.

 

Quality shows. On your schedule.

PBS Hawai‘i Passport is an added benefit for valued donors of public television.

With PBS Hawai‘i Passport, you can enjoy past episodes of many of your favorite PBS and PBS Hawai‘i shows on demand using your computer, smartphone or tablet. More platforms and devices are coming soon!

 

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The Human Face of Big Data

 

During the first day of a baby’s life the amount of data generated by humanity is equivalent to 70 times the information contained in the Library of Congress. What will it mean to live in a world where every moment, from birth to death, is digitally chronicled and preserved in vast cloud-based databases, forever? This film captures the promise and potential peril of the extraordinary knowledge revolution.