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Handel’s Messiah

Handel’s Messiah

 

Handel’s Messiah is a 90-minute docudrama – narrated by Jane Seymour – that tells the story of George Frideric Handel, how he was discovered in Halle, Germany at age nine, and his meteoric rise to celebrity composer at age 18. With more than 42 operas on three continents, Handel was a prodigious musical genius. And while many of his musical works have endured, his most notable composition, and one that’s investigated with most detail, is his oratorio Messiah. The debut performance of Messiah in Dublin, Ireland in 1742 was a turning point for George Handel. It was also a turning point for Charles Jennens, the man who wrote the libretto for the oratorio, and Susannah Cibber, a formerly-scorned actress/singer who regained her standing within the theater after performing her solo. Handel’s Messiah is an inspiring story of redemption. The message and the music is pertinent to all generations, regardless of personal beliefs.

 

Handel’s Messiah

 

 

 

POV SHORTS
Joe’s Violin

 

In the Oscar-nominated Joe’s Violin, a donated musical instrument forges an improbable friendship. 91-year-old Holocaust survivor Joe Feingold and 12-year-old Bronx school girl Brianna Perez show how the power of music can bring light in the darkest of times, and how a small act can have a significant impact.

 

 

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
Domestic Violence: Living in Fear

 

A national ranking of support services offered to domestic violence victims has Hawai‘i among the states at the bottom of the list. INSIGHTS examines the numbers and sheds light on domestic violence in the Islands with this live discussion.

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and online via Facebook and Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 


AMERICAN EXPERIENCE
Oklahoma City

 

Follow the rise of the extremist militia movement, from Ruby Ridge to Waco, which led to the deadliest act of domestic terrorism in American history – the 1995 bombing by Timothy McVeigh that killed 168 people in Oklahoma City.

 

GREAT PERFORMANCES
Gypsy

 

GREAT PERFORMANCES presents the London West End revival of Jule Styne and Stephen Sondheim’s musical based on the memoirs of striptease artist Gypsy Rose Lee. Imelda Staunton (Harry Potter) stars as Momma Rose, and Lara Pulver (Sherlock) portrays daughter Louise.

 

THE NATIONAL PARKS: AMERICA’S BEST IDEA
The Scripture of Nature (1851-1890)

THE NATIONAL PARKS: AMERICA’S BEST IDEA, The Scripture of Nature (1851-1890)

 

In 1851, word spreads across the country of a beautiful area of California’s Yosemite Valley, attracting visitors who wish to exploit the land’s scenery for commercial gain and those who wish to keep it pristine. Among the latter is a Scottish-born wanderer named John Muir, for whom protecting the land becomes a spiritual calling. In 1864, Congress passes an act that protects Yosemite from commercial development and preserves it for “public use, resort and recreation” – the first time in world history that any government has put forth this idea – and hands control of the land to California. Meanwhile, a “wonderland” in the northwest corner of the Wyoming territory attracts visitors to its bizarre landscape of geysers, mud pots and sulfur pits. In 1872, Congress passes an act to protect this land as well. Since it is located in a territory, rather than a state, it becomes America’s first national park: Yellowstone.

 

THE NATIONAL PARKS: AMERICA’S BEST IDEA
The Last Refuge (1890-1915)

THE NATIONAL PARKS: AMERICA’S BEST IDEA, The Last Refuge (1890-1915)

 

This six-part documentary series directed by Ken Burns is the story of an idea as uniquely American as the Declaration of Independence and just as radical: that the most special places in the nation should be preserved, not for royalty or the rich, but for everyone.

 

By the end of the 19th century, widespread industrialization has left many Americans worried about whether the country – once a vast wilderness – will have any pristine land left. At the same time, poachers in the parks are rampant, and visitors think nothing of littering or carving their names near iconic sites like Old Faithful. Congress has yet to establish clear judicial authority or appropriations for the protection of the parks. This sparks a conservation movement by organizations such as the Sierra Club, led by John Muir; the Audubon Society, led by George Bird Grinnell; and the Boone and Crockett Club, led by Theodore Roosevelt. The movement fails, however, to stop San Francisco from building the Hetch Hetchy dam at Yosemite, flooding Muir’s “mountain temple” and leaving him broken-hearted before he dies.

 

THE NATIONAL PARKS: AMERICA’S BEST IDEA
The Empire of Grandeur (1915-1919)

THE NATIONAL PARKS: AMERICA’S BEST IDEA, The Empire of Grandeur (1915-1919)

 

This six-part documentary series directed by Ken Burns is the story of an idea as uniquely American as the Declaration of Independence and just as radical: that the most special places in the nation should be preserved, not for royalty or the rich, but for everyone.

 

In the early 20th century, America has a dozen national parks, but they are a haphazard patchwork of special places under the supervision of different federal agencies. The conservation movement, after failing to stop the Hetch Hetchy dam, pushes the government to establish one unified agency to oversee all the parks, leading to the establishment of the National Park Service in 1916. Its first director, Stephen Mather, a wealthy businessman and passionate park advocate who fought vigorously to establish the NPS, launches an energetic campaign to expand the national park system and bring more visitors to the parks. Among his efforts is protection of the Grand Canyon from encroaching commercial interests and its establishment as a national park, rather than a national monument.

 

THE NATIONAL PARKS: AMERICA’S BEST IDEA
Going Home (1920-1933)

THE NATIONAL PARKS: AMERICA’S BEST IDEA, Going Home (1920-1933)

 

This six-part documentary series directed by Ken Burns is the story of an idea as uniquely American as the Declaration of Independence and just as radical: that the most special places in the nation should be preserved, not for royalty or the rich, but for everyone.

 

While visiting the parks was once predominantly the domain of Americans wealthy enough to afford the high-priced train tours, the advent of the automobile allows more people than ever before to visit the parks. Mather embraces this opportunity and works to build more roads in the parks. Some park enthusiasts, such as Margaret and Edward Gehrke of Nebraska, begin “collecting” parks, making a point to visit as many as they can. In North Carolina, Horace Kephart, a reclusive writer, and George Masa, a Japanese immigrant, launch a campaign to protect the last strands of virgin forest in the Smoky Mountains by establishing it as a park. In Wyoming, John D. Rockefeller Jr. begins quietly buying up land in the Teton Mountain Range and valley in a secret plan to donate it to the government as a park.

 

THE NATIONAL PARKS: AMERICA’S BEST IDEA
Great Nature (1933-1945)

THE NATIONAL PARKS: AMERICA’S BEST IDEA, Great Nature (1933-1945)

 

This six-part documentary series directed by Ken Burns is the story of an idea as uniquely American as the Declaration of Independence and just as radical: that the most special places in the nation should be preserved, not for royalty or the rich, but for everyone.

 

To battle unemployment in the Great Depression, Franklin D. Roosevelt creates the Civilian Conservation Corps, which spawns a “golden age” for the parks through major renovation projects. In a groundbreaking study, a young NPS biologist named George Melendez Wright discovers widespread abuses of animal habitats and pushes the service to reform its wildlife policies. Congress narrowly passes a bill to protect the Everglades in Florida as a national park – the first time a park has been created solely to preserve an ecosystem, as opposed to scenic beauty. As America becomes entrenched in World War II, Roosevelt is pressured to open the parks to mining, grazing and lumbering. The president also is subjected to a storm of criticism for expanding the Grand Teton National Park in Wyoming by accepting a gift of land secretly purchased by John D. Rockefeller Jr.

 

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