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NAZI MEGA WEAPONS
V1: Hitler’s Vengeance Missile

NAZI MEGA WEAPONS: V1: Hitler’s Vengeance Missile

 

In retaliation for devastating Allied bombing raids on German cities, Hitler orders the development of a groundbreaking weapon. This is the story of one of the most ambitious projects of the Third Reich: Hitler’s Vengeance weapon, the V1. Though it was ready too late to make a difference to the outcome of the war, its legacy is the cruise missile — a weapon that changed the face of war forever.

 

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Taking Our Cue from the Kukui Tree

 

Architect Sheryl Seaman created these kukui designs for our NEW HOME. The designs are featured on PBS Hawaii's new t-shirt.

Architect Sheryl Seaman created these kukui designs for our NEW HOME. The designs are featured on PBS Hawai‘i’s new t-shirt

 

Leslie Wilcox, President and CEO of PBS HawaiiIf you pluck just one nut from a kukui tree, you will have oil to illuminate the dark for more than three minutes. That’s one of many reasons that Polynesian voyagers brought kukui saplings aboard their canoes to this new land more than 1,500 years ago. Almost every part of the kukui tree was useful in the settlers’ everyday lives. Today the kukui tree is our state tree.

 

Our PBS Hawai‘i team looks forward to seeing the kukui represented on our soon-to-be NEW HOME on Nimitz Highway. Group 70 International architect Sheryl Seaman has designed an artful metal screen to enfold the building, depicting historically important Hawaiian plants of the area.

 

The kukui is a particular favorite of ours because it does what we try to do in our own way – be useful every day and illuminate.

 

At last month’s meeting of PBS Hawai‘i’s statewide Community Advisory Board, Maui member Kainoa Horcajo called out a recent illuminating Insights on PBS Hawai‘i program. Three individuals who’ve been diagnosed with stage-four (advanced) cancer spoke candidly on live television about what they think about and what their lives are like as they face the prospect of death.

 

“What is more shrouded in darkness and needs more illumination than death?” Horcajo asked. “(Hawaiian) sovereignty and death – those are the elephants in the room in Hawai‘i.”

 

Lei Kihoi Dunne of Hawai‘i Island spoke of activists in her rural county. A Kona attorney, Dunne said, “They need to know how to access and participate and properly conduct themselves in advocacy that truly advances their cause.”

 

“Right now, people feel outside the process,” Dunne said. “They can be empowered to make a difference and bring, for example, a contested-case hearing to protect natural resources and culture.”

 

Horcajo agreed that knowledge of procedure counts: “Knocking on the wrong doors engenders apathy – a feeling that nothing will change…You don’t go to a shave ice store to buy a loco moco.”

 

Oahu member Cheryl Ka‘uhane Lupenui said that civics education is important for good citizenship: “It’s wayfinding.”

 

Long ago, Polynesian voyagers brought the means to create light. The kukui tree design on our new building will be a constant reminder to shed light on things that matter.

 

Aloha a hui hou,

Leslie signature

 

Neighborly Gifts that Hit the Spot

 

Leslie Wilcox, President and CEO of PBS HawaiiIf you’re lucky, there’s someone in your life who always comes up with a perfect gift–and often it’s an item that’s not even on your radar.

 

We sometimes feel that way at PBS Hawaii, with people helping us in ways that we don’t expect.

 

There are especially thoughtful people on Neighbor Islands. We send our “free” broadcast signals farther than those of any commercial TV station to reach more people, and Neighbor Islanders reach back.

 

Here are two recent examples, beginning with Kauai woodworker Dean Mayer:

 

—“I made a lot of sawdust, that’s how I made it.”

 

Dean is humbly explaining how he crafted a beautiful, rich-grained lobby desk for PBS Hawaii’s future home. It’s in his Omao workshop, ready to be shipped to Honolulu.

 

Kauai woodworker Dean Mayer created this reception desk for PBS Hawaii's future lobby.

Kauai woodworker Dean Mayer created this reception desk for PBS Hawaii’s future lobby.

 

The wood is from a large monkey pod tree that had to be cut down because its growth was threatening the safety of a home on the Koloa property of his friend, Dan Suga.

 

Dean says he was moved to make the desk because he enjoys PBS Hawaii programming.

 

Everyone who enters our future home will see Dean’s creation as soon as they open the door. We hope you’ll come and visit.

 

—“Everyone loved seeing Downton Abbey on the big screen.”

 

That’s Susan Bendon of Spreckelsville, Maui, talking about a “pop-up” screening she gamely pulled off with little notice. Taking time out from the busy holiday season, a group of Maui residents watched the highly anticipated premiere of Downton Abbey’s fi nal season more than a week before television viewers were able to see it. Susan, a PBS Hawaii Board Member, enlisted Seabury Hall’s Lynn Matayoshi and they presented the episode in the school’s comfortable auditorium.

 

Top Left: On Maui, PBS supporter Ann Jones and PBS Hawaii Board Member Susan Bendon, greet guests at an advance screening of Downton Abbey at Seabury Hall. Top-right: Maui Magazine publisher Diane Haynes Woodburn at the Downton Abbey advance screening.
Top Left: On Maui, PBS supporter Ann Jones and PBS Hawaii Board Member Susan Bendon, greet guests at an advance screening of Downton Abbey at Seabury Hall. Top-right: Maui Magazine publisher Diane Haynes Woodburn at the Downton Abbey advance screening.
 

In Honolulu, we worked with Ward Consolidated Theatres to give an advance screening for fans.

 

“PBS made many friends,” Susan said. See what I mean? With Lynn, Susan made it happen.

 

With Dan Suga’s tree, Dean made it happen. We are lucky indeed.

 

Aloha a hui hou,

Leslie signature

 

PBS Hawaii, Seabury Hall to host free ‘Downton Abbey’ advance screening

Press Release Header

 

PBS Hawaii and Seabury Hall invite the public to a free “pop-up” screening of the Season 6 premiere episode of Downton Abbey, the hit Masterpiece PBS show.

 

Monday, December 28

Seabury Hall Creative Arts Center

480 Olinda Road, Makawao, Maui 96768

Doors 6:15 pm | Show 7:00 pm

 

 

The screening is in advance of the show’s broadcast premiere on Sunday, January 3 at 8:00 pm on PBS Hawaii. Seating is first come, first served.

 

Questions about this screening can be directed to PBS Hawaii Board Member, Susan Bendon, of Maui: susanbendon@gmail.com or 808.871.6181.

 

Download this Press Release

 

For questions regarding this press release
Contact: Liberty Peralta
Email: lperalta@pbshawaii.org
Phone: 808.973.1383

 

PBS Hawaii is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization and Hawaii’s sole member of the trusted Public Broadcasting Service (PBS). We advance learning and discovery through storytelling that profoundly touches people’s lives. We bring the world to Hawaii and Hawaii to the world. PBSHawaii.org | facebook.com/pbshawaii | @pbshawaii

 

NOVA
Vaccines: Calling the Shots

 

Diseases that were largely eradicated in the United States a generation ago – including whooping cough, measles and mumps – are returning, in part because nervous parents are skipping their children’s shots. Go around the world to track epidemics, explore the science behind vaccinations and discover the risks of opting out.