Aloha

What’s it Going to Take?
Forums on Making Life Better in Hawaiʻi

What's it Going to Take? Forums on making life better in Hawaiʻi

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI
Suicide Prevention

 

It’s a stunning statement: Suicide is the leading cause of injury-related death in Hawaiʻi. Health officials report that an average of 190 people take their own lives each year. The reasons stem from depression, significant life changes and the trauma of abuse. Nearly a thousand other individuals survive a suicide attempt. But suicide can be prevented, and everyone can help. Join the discussion on Suicide Prevention on INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI. You can phone in or leave us a comment on Facebook or Twitter.

 

Suicide Prevention Hotlines. Oʻahu: 832-3100, Neighbor Islands: 1-800-753-6879

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

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Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

 

 

Ahumanu
Maui-based Trio

Cover story by Liberty Peralta, PBS Hawaiʻi

 

Ahumanu on Nā Mele: Traditions in Hawaiian Song

Members of Ahumanu: Kekai Robinson, Marja Lehua Apisaloma and Liz Morales

 

Like the latest smartphone or computer software, Ahumanu founding member Liz Morales calls the band’s third and current lineup of band members “Ahumanu 3.0.”

 

It’s not unusual for bands to see lineup changes. But Morales, a former radio personality, is confident that this version is something special.

 

“We have our own sound, and that comes from working with what we have,” Morales says. “Since we had so many different players, each version of Ahumanu sounded very different, so I think it’s only until Ahumanu 3.0 that I realized, hey, this is kind of different, I like it.”

 

Marja Lehua Apisaloma and Kekai Robinson round out the Maui trio, whose name translates as “a gathering of birds.” Each member brings her own contributions to the Ahumanu table.

 

Ahumanu on Nā Mele: Traditions in Hawaiian Song

 

Apisaloma says her day job as a registered nurse helps add some level of authenticity to the group’s music – a reminder of how much they have to be thankful for, down to the most essential details.

 

“We can breathe and we can use the bathroom on our own, we can walk on our own, we can speak,” she says. “You see all of that as a nurse and see people at their most vulnerable times. It’s such a drastic difference from the entertainment industry because you put on a face and it’s all a show.”

 

Robinson, who heads Hawaiian immersion school Ke Kula ʻO Piʻilani by day, says Ahumanu is an extension of the community work that’s played an important role in her life.

 

NĀ MELE: TRADITIONS IN HAWAIIAN MUSIC - Ahumanu airs Monday, February 24 at 7:30 pm. Sponsored by: Hawaiian Airlines and First Hawaiian Bank“I practice Hawaiian oli (chants), and those are the messages and the voices of our ancestors coming through,” she says. “The messages that they give us are relevant now, so there’s a great sense of responsibility there to do the same in our music.”

 

That responsibility shows in songs like “Kahi Aloha,” one of several songs that Ahumanu performs on an upcoming episode of PBS Hawaiʻi’s Nā Mele: Traditions in Hawaiian Song. Originally written as a wedding gift, “Kahi Aloha” has taken on a larger meaning in Robinson’s eyes.

 

“Aloha has become a big part of this contemporary move towards protecting our environment, protecting what we have,” she says. “When you stand in aloha, you can come at me and bring whatever it is that you are to me, but I am going to stand here and remain respectful towards you. It’s a discipline, and so, I understand it now. It’s not our normal state. We want to work towards aloha being a normal state.”

 

Through their weekly pau hana performances in Kahului, Ahumanu has a regular platform to share their messages in song, with authenticity, respect and love. Ahumanu 3.0 is on a roll, and Morales ponders what’s next.

 

“I’d like to be a resource for the next generation of musicians that would like to do this,” she says. “Growing up in this field, it was such a mess. I didn’t know how to get where I wanted to be and those lines were so unclear … [now] I’m living the life, having a great time and very happy that I’m able to help perpetuate what we’ve known forever: Hawaiian music.”

 

 

PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS
Journey to Emalani

PBS HAWAII PRESENTS Journey to Emalani

 

The commemoration of Queen Emma’s 1871 visit to the upland forest of West Kauai, as experienced by three hula halau, is the subject of this PBS Hawai‘i-produced film. It follows the halau and their kumu hula to Kokee for an annual festival of hula and chant, Eo e Emalani i Alaka’i (Emalani Festival): Tony Conjugacion’s Hālau Nā Wainohia; Charlani Kalama’s Hālau Ha’a Hula O Kekau’ilani Nā Pua Hala O Kailua; and Healani Youn’s The Ladies of Ke’alaokalaua’e. Hawaiian music icon Nina Keali’iwahamana narrates.

 

 

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI
2020 Legislative Preview

 

What are the biggest issues facing Hawaiʻi’s state lawmakers in 2020? Raising the minimum wage from the current $10.10 per hour? Easing the lack of affordable housing across the state? Legalizing recreational marijuana? Climate change and its effect on our shorelines and lifestyle? Join the conversation with legislative leaders and community watchdogs as INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI returns with a 2020 Legislative Preview. You can phone in, or leave us a comment on Facebook or Twitter.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

 

 

What’s it Going to Take? Executive forum

What's it Going to Take? An executive forum on making life better in Hawaiʻi

 

NĀ MELE: TRADITIONS IN HAWAIIAN SONG
Melveen Leed

NA MELE: Melveen Leed

 

Singer Melveen Leed is joined by her hula dancer daughter Kaaikaula Naluai at the PBS Hawai‘i studios. Best known for contemporary Hawaiian, jazz and country, Moloka‘i girl Melveen also has deep roots in traditional Hawaiian song.

 

 

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI
What’s it Going to Take? – Does Hawaiʻi Have the Will and the Resiliency to Build a Better Future?

 

PBS Hawaiʻi continues to ask What’s It Going to Take?, in an ongoing series of live televised forums seeking to galvanize decision-makers, communities and all of us to make life in Hawaiʻi better. Does Hawaiʻi Have the Will and the Resiliency to Build a Better Future? That’s the subject of our next special edition of INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI. The numbers are daunting, even scary. Nearly 50% of Hawaiʻi residents barely get by; 62% of all jobs in in the state pay less than $20 per hour; and the crisis in affordable housing drives many people to leave Hawaiʻi for the Continent. But others stay, and some return, drawn by family, culture and the aloha spirit. Join the discussion by phoning in or leaving us a comment on Facebook or Twitter. INSIGHTS is also streamed live on pbshawaii.org and PBS Hawaiʻi’s Facebook page.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

 

 

What’s it Going to Take?

What’s it Going to Take? is an n ongoing community forum on making life better in Hawaiʻi. Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email, Twitter or live blogging. You may also email your questions ahead of time to insights@pbshawaii.org.

What’s it Going to Take?
An executive forum on making life better in Hawaiʻi

What's it Going to Take? - An executive forum on making life better in Hawaiʻi


Click the video above to watch What’s it Going to Take? on demand. Join host Leslie Wilcox for a live 2-hour conversation with top Hawaiʻi executives who bring detailed information and influence to help address deep-seated community problems. These executives are using detailed data* commissioned by the Hawaiʻi Community Foundation and combining their problem-solving experiences and influence to engage other sectors in a collaborative resolve to make life in Hawaiʻi better.

 

(Original airdate: Thursday, October 24, 2019)

 

Encore broadcasts of this program will air:
Sunday, October 27, 1 pm – 3 pm
Saturday, November 2, 8 pm – 10 pm

 

Hawaiʻi executives appearing on the program:

• Duane Kurisu, aio Founder, Hawaiʻi Executive Conference Chairman
• Catherine Ngo, President and CEO, Central Pacific Bank
• Bob Harrison, Chairman and CEO, First Hawaiian Bank
• Rich Wacker, President and CEO, American Savings Bank
• Micah Kāne, CEO and President, Hawaiʻi Community Foundation
• Colbert Matsumoto, Chairman, Tradewind Capital Group
• Jack Wong, CEO, Kamehameha Schools
• Elliot Mills, Vice President and General Manager, Aulani, Disney Resort and Spa
• Robert Nobriga, President, Island Holdings
• Ann Botticelli, Senior Vice President Communications and Public Affairs, Hawaiian Airlines

 

Click the link to learn more about the Change Framework: ChangeforHawaii.org

 

What's it Going to Take statistics: • Almost half of Hawaiʻi residents are barely making ends meet. • 6 out of 10 jobs pay less than a living wage. • 3 out of 4 people earning low wages still need housing. Source: Hawaiʻi Community Foundation

 

 

 

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