animal

NATURE
Animal Misfits

 

Alongside the fastest, strongest, smartest animals are nature’s misfits, odd, bizarre and unlikely creatures that at first glance seem ill-equipped for survival. Left at the starting line in the race for life, these are the apparent losers in the story of evolution, yet somehow they manage to cling to life and in some cases even thrive. Animals featured include: giant panda, mole rat, three-toed sloth and aye-aye.

 

 

NATURE
Giraffes: Africa’s Gentle Giants

 

What does it take to relocate a herd of wild giraffes in Africa? One man, his family, and a band of enthusiastic helpers are about to find out. Their journey will take them across the wild heart of Uganda, crossing the mighty Nile River. The importance of this operation cannot be underestimated, because these are Rothschild’s giraffes, the world’s rarest. Any mistake could be costly, not only for the giraffes being moved but also for an entire species.

 

 

NATURE
Pets: Wild at Heart: Secretive Creature

 

The second of a two-part series, Secretive Creatures looks into how our pets experience their world through hidden channels of communication revealed with ultra slow-motion, photography that makes smells visible, X-rays that reveal hidden powers, and ultraviolet light

 

 

NATURE
Pets: Wild at Heart: Playful Creatures

 

In this program filled with innovative photography and scientific revelation, we investigate how our favorite pets get in touch with their wild side through play. From talkative budgies, marathon-running hamsters, wall-climbing cats and diving dogs, discover how our pets’ playful games are just a whisker away from the wild.

 

 

NATURE
Soul of the Elephant

 

Ironically, every dead elephant with its ivory intact is a reason to celebrate. It means an elephant died of natural causes, not bullets, snares or poison, and a soul was allowed to be celebrated and mourned by its herd. Award-winning filmmakers Dereck and Beverly Joubert start with the remains of two bull elephants and through a series of key flashbacks, look at the lives they would have led, the dramas they may have seen, their great migrations for water with their families, and their encounters with lions and hyenas. This film, shot over two years, is an intimate look at elephants through the lens of two great storytellers of natural history.

 

SPY IN THE WILD – A NATURE MINISERIES
Meet the Spies

SPY IN THE WILD - A NATURE MINISERIES: Meet the Spies

 

More than 30 animatronic spy cameras disguised as animals secretly record animal behavior in the wild. These “spy creatures” reveal that animals show emotions and behavior similar to humans – a capacity to love, grieve, deceive, cooperate and invent.

 

Meet the Spies
This “making of” episode takes us through the evolution of Spy Creatures from the original boulder cam to the penguin cams that inspired the spycams in this series.

 

SHELTER ME:
Community Matters

SHELTER ME: Community Matters

 

This inspiring series celebrates the human-animal bond by telling uplifting stories about shelter pets and the people that help them. This episode, hosted by anthropologist Jane Goodall, features shelter dogs that are trained to protect endangered species. We follow the dogs from the day they are rescued to their deployment in Zambia where they are helping prevent the poaching of elephants and rhinos. Also: a high school cross country team takes shelter dogs for a run as part of their practice.

 

NATURE
A Sloth Named Velcro

 

Filmed in Panama, Costa Rica and Colombia, this is a story of friendship between a journalist and the sloth she named Velcro and a network of people working to learn more about sloths in order to protect them. Once largely ignored, sloths have become a hot topic of scientific researchers. New studies show that they’re not so “sloth-like” after all: despite their reputation, sloths in fact sleep only about as much as humans do and are much more active in the wild than they are in captivity. Other studies have shown sloths are not as solitary as we thought, that they have social structures and that males even keep small harems of females. New research into the gait of sloths has revealed another surprise. X-ray images and photographic analysis show that sloths actually move just like primates, only upside-down.

 

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