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INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI
The Haʻikū Stairs

 

Whatʻs the next step for the Stairs? The future of The Haʻikū Stairs has been fiercely debated for years. Also known as the Thousand Steps or the Stairway to Heaven, the long, narrow step structures make for a stunningly beautiful hike, high up a Windward Oʻahu ridge, providing panoramic views often posted on social media. The hike is both popular and illegal. Residents in a nearby Kāneʻohe neighborhood have endured the trespassers and their noise for many years. The current owner of most of the land under the deteriorating stairs, the Honolulu Board of Water Supply, wants to free itself of the liability and tear down the stairs – or transfer responsibility. Join the conversation on INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI. You can phone in, or leave us a comment on Facebook or Twitter.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

 

 


THE CRIMSON FIELD
Part 4 of 6


Oona Chaplin stars in a drama about WWI’s frontline medics – their hopes, fears, triumphs and tragedies. In a tented field hospital on the coast of France, a team of doctors, nurses and women volunteers works together to heal the bodies and souls of men wounded in the trenches.

 

Part 4 of 6
The arrival of soldiers from her home town lifts Joan’s spirits, but she finds herself in trouble. Thomas seizes his opportunity to pursue Kitty. Meanwhile, the return of an old patient causes ripples, calling everyone’s loyalties into question.

 

THE CRIMSON FIELD
Part 1 of 6

 

Oona Chaplin stars in a drama about WWI’s frontline medics – their hopes, fears, triumphs and tragedies. In a tented field hospital on the coast of France, a team of doctors, nurses and women volunteers works together to heal the bodies and souls of men wounded in the trenches.

 

Part 1 of 6
Follow Kitty, Flora and Rosalie – volunteer nurses who work in a tented field hospital. As they settle into their first day, it soon becomes clear that no training could ever have prepared them for the reality of working near the front line.

 

Neighborly Gifts that Hit the Spot

 

Leslie Wilcox, President and CEO of PBS HawaiiIf you’re lucky, there’s someone in your life who always comes up with a perfect gift–and often it’s an item that’s not even on your radar.

 

We sometimes feel that way at PBS Hawaii, with people helping us in ways that we don’t expect.

 

There are especially thoughtful people on Neighbor Islands. We send our “free” broadcast signals farther than those of any commercial TV station to reach more people, and Neighbor Islanders reach back.

 

Here are two recent examples, beginning with Kauai woodworker Dean Mayer:

 

—“I made a lot of sawdust, that’s how I made it.”

 

Dean is humbly explaining how he crafted a beautiful, rich-grained lobby desk for PBS Hawaii’s future home. It’s in his Omao workshop, ready to be shipped to Honolulu.

 

Kauai woodworker Dean Mayer created this reception desk for PBS Hawaii's future lobby.

Kauai woodworker Dean Mayer created this reception desk for PBS Hawaii’s future lobby.

 

The wood is from a large monkey pod tree that had to be cut down because its growth was threatening the safety of a home on the Koloa property of his friend, Dan Suga.

 

Dean says he was moved to make the desk because he enjoys PBS Hawaii programming.

 

Everyone who enters our future home will see Dean’s creation as soon as they open the door. We hope you’ll come and visit.

 

—“Everyone loved seeing Downton Abbey on the big screen.”

 

That’s Susan Bendon of Spreckelsville, Maui, talking about a “pop-up” screening she gamely pulled off with little notice. Taking time out from the busy holiday season, a group of Maui residents watched the highly anticipated premiere of Downton Abbey’s fi nal season more than a week before television viewers were able to see it. Susan, a PBS Hawaii Board Member, enlisted Seabury Hall’s Lynn Matayoshi and they presented the episode in the school’s comfortable auditorium.

 

Top Left: On Maui, PBS supporter Ann Jones and PBS Hawaii Board Member Susan Bendon, greet guests at an advance screening of Downton Abbey at Seabury Hall. Top-right: Maui Magazine publisher Diane Haynes Woodburn at the Downton Abbey advance screening.
Top Left: On Maui, PBS supporter Ann Jones and PBS Hawaii Board Member Susan Bendon, greet guests at an advance screening of Downton Abbey at Seabury Hall. Top-right: Maui Magazine publisher Diane Haynes Woodburn at the Downton Abbey advance screening.
 

In Honolulu, we worked with Ward Consolidated Theatres to give an advance screening for fans.

 

“PBS made many friends,” Susan said. See what I mean? With Lynn, Susan made it happen.

 

With Dan Suga’s tree, Dean made it happen. We are lucky indeed.

 

Aloha a hui hou,

Leslie signature

 

TIME SCANNERS
Jerusalem

TIME SCANNERS: Jerusalem

 

With cutting-edge technology that can “read” buildings, ruins and landscapes from ancient worlds, TIME SCANNERS reveals physical and forensic history, allowing viewers to virtually reach out and touch the past.

 

Jerusalem
Explore Jerusalem’s building legacy, from the walls of Temple Mount to the man-made mountain of Herodium. Experts use 21st-century technology to analyze constructions from the time of Christ and solve centuries-old mysteries behind their creation.

 

THE CRIMSON FIELD
Part 6 of 6

 

Oona Chaplin stars in a drama about WWI’s frontline medics – their hopes, fears, triumphs and tragedies. In a tented field hospital on the coast of France, a team of doctors, nurses and women volunteers works together to heal the bodies and souls of men wounded in the trenches.

 

Part 6 of 6
As Joan faces a possible lifetime in prison, Kitty’s wracked with guilt that she knew about Joan but didn’t stop her. Kitty is desperate for someone to trust, but will she turn to Thomas or Miles? As the war machine grinds on, faith, hope and love are put to the test.