Arts

HIKI NŌ
Archers to Art and other stories

 

TOP STORY:

 

“Archers to Art”
Students from Ke Kula Niihau O Kekaha Public Charter School on Kauaʻi tell the story of how members of their school’s archery program created, through a process of problem solving, an activity that produces wildly colorful, spontaneous works of art. Student archers decided to place balloons onto the traditional archery targets with the intent of having the arrows burst the balloons. The wind caused the balloons to move around, so the students filled them with water to anchor them in place. They then decided to add paint to the water, and laid cardboard down to avoid messing up the surrounding area. Noticing the colorful designs the splatters created, they replaced the cardboard with watercolor paper. Thus was created this innovative genre of painting.

 

ALSO FEATURED:

 

“Waimea’s Rain Rock”
Students from Hawaiʻi Preparatory Academy Middle School in the Waimea district of Hawaiʻi Island tell the story of a legendary rain rock which was said to have saved Waimea from a devastating drought.

 

“Student Poet”
Students from Kauaʻi High School in Līhuʻe tell the story of a young poet who uses creativity to battle depression.

 

“Jiu Jitsu Preacher”
Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School in Pukalani tell the story of a martial arts school that is also a place of worship.

 

“How to Care for an Abandoned Baby Bird”
Students from Īʻao School on Maui show us how to nurse an abandoned baby bird back to health.

 

“Betty Santoki”
Students from Farrington High School on Oʻahu introduce us to a Class of 1962 Farrington graduate who has dedicated her life to keeping Japanese traditions alive in her community.

 

“Suburbia”
A student at H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui shares her inner-most thoughts about becoming a filmmaker in a personal video essay.

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by students at Montessori School of Maui in Makawao.

 

 

 

GREAT MUSEUMS
The Art of Islam at the Met and the Louvre

 

Today, at a pivotal moment in world history, two great museums beckon us to explore the splendor of Islamic art – lifting the veil on our shared cultural heritage. GREAT MUSEUMS: THE ART OF ISLAM AT THE MET AND THE LOUVRE showcases the objects on display in the Islamic galleries at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York and The Louvre in Paris to reveal a roadmap of connections that explains why the foreign seems familiar. Narrated by Philippe de Montebello, the former director of The Met, GREAT MUSEUMS: THE ART OF ISLAM AT THE MET AND THE LOUVRE examines the extraordinary artistic masterpieces in the museums’ Islamic Art collections, and reveals a surprising number of connections that unite Western and Islamic traditions, in art, science, and literature. The film explores the surprising cultural relationships between the Islamic and the Western worlds. The art of Islam reflects 14 centuries of changing political and cultural landscapes across three continents. The term “Islamic art” – coined by 19th century art historians – includes all art produced in Muslim lands from the 7th century forward, from Spain to Morocco, Egypt, the Middle East, Central Asia and India, to the borders of China. Universal museums like The Louvre and The Met help dispel the idea that cultures are exclusive, when, in fact, they are intertwined and connected.

 

 

 

NĀ MELE: TRADITIONS IN HAWAIIAN SONG
Natalie Ai Kamauu and Family

Na Mele: Natalie Ai Kamauu and Family

 

Natalie Ai Kamauu’s voice fills the PBS Hawaiʻi studio.  Natalie performs with a passion that comes from the origins of the songs she sings, and the love she has for her family. She is joined by her husband, Iolani Kamauu, on guitar and vocals, and their daughter, Sha-Lei Kamauu, who accompanies the music with hula.

 

Program

 

Among the songs featured are “Pili Aloha,” which connects Natalie to her mother, kumu hula Olana Ai, and “Shower Tree,” which was written for Natalie and Iolani’s son, Chaz. Sha-Lei joins Natalie and Iolani with hula, including the playful “Hula Tease,” and a graceful accompaniment to Natalie and Iolaniʻs performance on “Uhiwai.”

 

 

 

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW
The Gen X Years

 

Explore the era between Boomers and Millennials for exciting treasures from the mid-1960s to early 1980s, also known as the Generation X years. Standout appraisals include Matt Groening artwork, Charles Loloma bracelets and Evel Knievel’s leathers.

 

 

 

Designers of the Dance

 

Venture into the studio with legendary dancers and choreographers in DESIGNERS OF THE DANCE. The program takes viewers behind the scenes to learn about the work and process that go into making a ballet great, and features stunning performances of five unique dance pieces – Alexei Ratmansky’s retake of The Nutcracker, Leonid Lavrovsky’s ground-breaking Romeo & Juliet, Lar Lubovitch’s powerful Othello, Alastair Marriott’s hauntingly beautiful Liederand Yuri Possikhov’s Diving Into the Lilacs. With stops at the American Ballet Theatre, the Bolshoi Ballet, the San Francisco Ballet and the Royal Ballet, DESIGNERS OF THE DANCE reveals the inspiration behind the creation of each work, and how the choreographers and dancers work together to bring these ballets to life.

 

 

 

PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS
Ka Hana Kapa

PBS HAWAII PRESENTS Hawaiian Masterpieces: Ka Hana Kapa

 

Ka Hana Kapa documents the history of kapa in Hawaiʻi and follows the complex process of Hawaiian kapa making from start to finish. Hawaiian kapa is one of the most beautiful art forms in the Pacific. In ancient Hawaiʻi, kapa, or bark cloth made from the wauke plant (Broussonetia papyrifera), was used for clothing, bedding, the wrapping of precious iwi (ancestor’s bones), important ceremonies, and a myriad of other purposes, making it an integral part of everyday life in Hawaiian society. Ka Hana Kapa is the story of kapa making in Hawaiʻi, as told by these dedicated kapa practitioners and their students, who have given new life to this intricate cultural practice. The film features interviews with kapa practitioners Marie McDonald, Roen Hufford, Dalani Tanahy, Moana Eisele, Dennis Kana’e Keawe, Kaʻiulani de Silva, and Eric Enos. Ka Hana Kapa also showcases the thrilling appearance of Halau O Kekuhi led by kumu hula Nalani Kanaka’ole attired in original kapa made specifically for the Halau at the opening of the 2011 Merrie Monarch Festival.

 

 

 

Dialogue in Metal

Dialogue in Metal

 

Renowned metal sculptor Albert Paley, who began his career as a jeweler, has become one of the most distinguished and influential metalsmiths in the world. Jesse James, an expert mechanic, owner of the custom motorcycle bike shop West Coast Choppers, and host of the Discovery Channel’s Monster Garage, known for celebrating the best in American craftsmanship. As his own career, business and artistic talents were emerging, Jesse looked to Albert Paley as an inspiration. DIALOGUE IN METAL is a collaborative art project that spans the country and challenges Albert and Jesse to process, engage and create – together and apart. They each begin a sculpture in their home studio, with Albert in Rochester, New York, and Jesse in Austin, Texas. Then, they switch sculptures as Albert forges and welds the metal to finish Jesse’s work and Jesse finishes Albert’s piece with his sheet metal artistry. The only dialogue throughout the project is through the metal itself. In the end, each sculpture reflects the style and personality of both artists.

 

 

 

GREAT PERFORMANCES: NOW HEAR THIS
Handel: Italian Style

 

Discover how Handel’s experience in Italy with fellow composers Vivaldi, Scarlatti and Corelli influenced his career. Host Scott Yoo traces Handel’s footsteps to understand how he embraced the country’s artistic and cultural traditions.

 

 

 

FAKE OR FORTUNE?
Toulouse-Lautrec

FAKE OR FORTUNE? Toulouse-Lautrec

 

The team investigates four sketchbooks which may be the work of the young French master. Alain Brun is a French psychoanalyst who lives in Bordeaux. He was given the sketchbooks by his grandmother in the 1960s and she always maintained they were the work of Toulouse Lautrec. Alain sent them to the Lautrec committee to see if they could be authenticated. They came back saying that it was actually the work of Lautrec’s tutor, Princeteau. However, Princeteau experts have disputed this – saying they are far too good. The team searches for evidence to see if they can irrefutably link these sketches to the young Lautrec and change the committee’s mind.

 

 

 

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