atom

NOVA WONDERS
What’s the Universe Made of?

 

Peer into the deepest unknowns of the universe to explore the mysteries of dark matter and dark energy. Join physicists on their quest to uncover the identity of these elusive components, and their epic battle over the fate of the universe

 

 

THE MYSTERY OF MATTER: SEARCH FOR THE ELEMENTS – Into The Atom (1910-1960)

THE MYSTERY OF MATTER: Into The Atom (1910-1960)

 

This series is about one of the great adventures in the history of science: the long, continuing quest to understand what the world is made of. Join host Michael Emerson to see not only what scientific explorers discovered, but also how.

 

Into The Atom (1910-1960)
Caught up in the race to discover the atom’s internal parts, Harry Moseley uses newly discovered X-rays to put the periodic table in a whole new light. Glenn Seaborg creates a new element – plutonium – that changes the world.

 

THE MYSTERY OF MATTER: SEARCH FOR THE ELEMENTS – Unruly Elements

 

This series is about one of the great adventures in the history of science: the long, continuing quest to understand what the world is made of. Join host Michael Emerson to see not only what scientific explorers discovered, but also how.

Unruly Elements (1859-1902)
Dmitri Mendeleev invents the periodic table, bringing order to the elements. This order is shattered when Marie Curie discovers radioactivity, revealing that elements can change identities and that atoms contain undiscovered parts.

 

Rickover:
The Birth of Nuclear Power

 

Combative, provocative and searingly blunt, Admiral Hyman G. Rickover was a flamboyant maverick and a unique American. When few thought it possible, then-Captain Rickover undertook to harness the power of the atom to drive the first nuclear-powered submarine, the USS Nautilus, whose trip under the polar ice pack was one of the great adventure stories of the 1950s. Later, Rickover built the world’s first commercial nuclear power plant at Shippingport, PA. Rickover’s achievements made him a national celebrity, and he appeared on the cover of Time magazine. Many questioned Rickover’s goal of an all nuclear navy, and others questioned his creation of a technocratic elite, his own navy within the Navy. However, few contested that he had transformed the Navy and changed the course of America’s technological development.