belief

WE’LL MEET AGAIN
Coming Out

WE’LL MEET AGAIN: Coming Out

 

Join Ann Curry as those whose lives were changed by the early days of the gay rights movement reunite. Tom wants to find the childhood friend who urged him to come out, while Paul seeks a fellow student who inspired him to stand up for his beliefs.

 

 

PACIFIC HEARTBEAT
Waiting for John

 

Feel the pulse of the pacific – the stories of its people, cultures, languages, music and contemporary issues – in Season 5 of PACIFIC HEARTBEAT, the nationally distributed series from Pacific Islanders in Communications and PBS Hawaii. The five films in this season highlight struggles, values and victories that draw us together and make our Pacific cultures unique.

 

Waiting for John
If you had never heard of an airplane or a refrigerator, would you think it was a miracle when one arrived? When the American military landed on a remote island in the South Pacific during World War II, the islanders were amazed by America’s fantastic cargo. The John Frum Movement was born: a unique religion now considered the last surviving “cargo cult.” The program explores the history and last vestiges of this extraordinary religion, and in the process asks, where do our prophets come from? And what makes people believe?

 

NHK SPECIAL
Lt. Onodaʻs Return: The Untold Story of a Japanese War Straggler

NHK SPECIAL Lt. Onoda’s Return: The Untold Story of a Japanese War Straggler

 

In December 1944, intelligence officer Hiroo Onoda of the Japanese Imperial Army was deployed to Lubang Island in the Philippines, where he was given orders to disrupt and sabotage enemy efforts. Although the Japanese surrendered on August 15, 1945, Onoda and three others vowed to continue this mission. After 30 years of living as a war straggler, Onoda surrendered to his ex-commander and received a hero’s welcome upon returning to his homeland. However, Japan and the Philippines saw Onoda’s return as a sensitive political and diplomatic matter that required careful orchestration.

 

Different Strokes in Our Hawai‘i Canoe

 

CEO Message

Different Strokes in Our Hawai‘i Canoe

Participants at KĀKOU - Hawai‘iʻs Town Hall: Solomon Alfapada

Solomon AlfapadaTop row: Jim Dooley, Ulalia Woodside, Sean-Joseph Choo, Tracy Alambatin, Shayne Shibuya.
Bottom row: Denby Fawcett, Ryan Ozawa, Burt Lum, Ku‘uipo Kumukahi

Leslie Wilcox, PBS Hawai‘i President and CEOWas it an “Only in Hawai‘i” phenomenon?

 

Before the red camera lights signaled the start of last month’s two-hour live KĀKOU – Hawai‘i’s Town Hall, our studio chief Jason Suapaia asked the 70 participants with diverse perspectives to “keep the discussion civil.”

 

He needn’t have worried. The discussion was interesting and it got lively, but as it turns out, the participants had a higher standard than civil. They were polite and even generous.

 

As participant Donne Dawson said afterward, “I deliberately did not raise my hand a second time even though I had lots more to say because I wanted more of the diverse group to weigh in.”

 

PBS Hawai‘i named our new Town Hall program KĀKOU because it means “all of us,” as in: All of us in these isolated islands – no matter how different – are in the same canoe. The question up for discussion: “Have you fact-checked your truth?”

 

In reflecting upon the experience, PBS Hawai‘i Board Member Aaron Salā wrote: “Probably nowhere else in the world would you get so many different kinds, and colors, of people in the same room at the same time to discuss a series of rather intimate thoughts and beliefs. Only in Hawai‘i…”

 

He harkened back to plantation times and the exorbitantly long, hard work days.

 

“That drive to survive caused us to figure out how to live together and rather than feign color-blindness (a concept that continues to baffle me), we celebrate a color-consciousness that helps us to really see each other,” Aaron said.

 

“So,” he continued, “we started this process in survival mode and, in many ways, we still choose to negotiate our peace every day because we know that we must survive. In a sense, we are the American dream come true.” And yet, he believes, “we are probably also the most outwardly racist community in the world.”

 

Participant Burt Lum, co-host of Hawai‘i Public Radio’s Bytemarks Café, was among several people who went home and kept wrestling with the topic of the discussion, about the idea of truth vs. reality.

 

He pictured a stadium full of people.

 

“There is some degree of shared reality, like the fact that you are all watching a football game,” Burt wrote me. “But for the most part everyone there has their own sense of reality, a result of inherent being, accumulated experiences and moral compass.”

 

Two hours on live TV and live streaming flew by. As we signed off, I thought how glad I am to be in the same canoe with these fellow Islanders who can directly address their differences, don’t pretend to have all of the answers, and actually listen to each other.

 

A hui hou (until next time),

 

Leslie signature

Leslie Wilcox
President and CEO
PBS Hawai‘i

 

AMERICAN EXPERIENCE
Walt Disney, Part 2

 

Walt Disney was uniquely adept at art as well as commerce, a master filmmaker who harnessed the power of technology and storytelling. This two-part film examines Disney’s complex life and enduring legacy, featuring rare archival footage from the Disney vaults, scenes from some of his greatest films, and interviews with biographers, animators and artists who worked on early films, including Snow White, and the designers who helped turn his dream of Disneyland into reality.

 

AMERICAN EXPERIENCE
Walt Disney, Part 1 of 2

 

Walt Disney was uniquely adept at art as well as commerce, a master filmmaker who harnessed the power of technology and storytelling. This two-part film examines Disney’s complex life and enduring legacy, featuring rare archival footage from the Disney vaults, scenes from some of his greatest films, and interviews with biographers, animators and artists who worked on early films, including Snow White, and the designers who helped turn his dream of Disneyland into reality.

 

PBS Hawai‘i to host free 3D film screening

PBS Hawaii

***Update 8/21/17: RSVPs are at capacity for this event! We will have a standby line to fill up seats left by no-shows, though seating for those in the standby line is not guaranteed. There are 52 stalls in our parking lot, so we highly encourage carpooling whenever possible.***

 

For questions regarding this press release, contact:
Liberty Peralta
lperalta@pbshawaii.org
808.462.5030

 

Download this Press Release

 

PBS Hawai‘i to host free 3D film screening

Q&A to follow with Maui filmmaker Tom Vendetti, musician Keola Beamer

Tibetan Illusion Destroyer in 3D

 

HONOLULU, HI – PBS Hawai‘i will be hosting its first free 3D film screening at its Honolulu headquarters:

 

Tibetan Illusion Destroyer in 3D
Wednesday, August 23, 6-8 pm
PBS Hawai‘i, 315 Sand Island Access Road, Honolulu
Followed by Q&A with filmmaker Tom Vendetti and musician Keola Beamer
Free and open to the public – RSVP on eventbrite.com

 

Tibetan Illusion Destroyer is a documentary by Maui filmmaker Tom Vendetti about the Mani Rimdu Festival in Nepal, and its message, rooted in Tibetan Buddhism, of destroying man-made illusions that lead to human suffering.

 

“The film was shot in 3D to enhance the ‘illusion’ message and the overall viewing experience,” Vendetti said in a statement.

 

Vendetti and renowned slack key artist Keola Beamer were among a Hawai‘i contingent that journeyed to Nepal to witness and document the festival. Beamer worked with local musicians in Nepal to create the film’s original music. Both Vendetti and Beamer are scheduled for an audience Q&A session after the free screening.

 


PBS Hawai‘i is a 501(c) (3) nonprofit organization and Hawai‘i’s sole member of the trusted Public Broadcasting Service (PBS). We advance learning and discovery through storytelling that profoundly touches people’s lives. We bring the world to Hawai‘i and Hawai‘i to the world. pbshawaii.org | facebook.com/pbshawaii | @pbshawaii

 

The Buddha

 

Two and a half millennia ago, a new religion was born in northern India, generated from the ideas of a single man, the Buddha, a mysterious sage who famously gained enlightenment while sitting under a tree. This documentary tells the story of his life.

 

POV
Listening is an Act of Love: A StoryCorps Special

 

This animated special from StoryCorps celebrates the transformative power of listening, featuring six stories from 10 years of the innovative oral history project, where everyday people sit down together to share memories and tackle life’s important questions.

 

INDEPENDENT LENS
The Trials of Muhammad Ali

 

This documentary covers Muhammad Ali’s toughest bout: his battle to overturn his five-year prison sentence for refusing U.S. military service. The film traces a formative period in Ali’s life, one unknown to young people and neglected by those who remember him as a boxer but overlook how controversial he was when he first took center stage. When Cassius Clay became Muhammad Ali, he found himself caught up in conflicts concerning civil rights, religion and wartime dissent. This film focuses on the years 1967 to 1970, when Ali lived in exile within the U.S., stripped of his heavyweight belt and banned from boxing, sacrificing fame and fortune on principle.

 

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