broadcast

LAST TANGO IN HALIFAX
Season 3, Part 2 of 6

LAST TANGO IN HALIFAX Season 3, Part 2 of 6

 

Enjoy the third season of this award-winning series that celebrates life and love. Celia (Anne Reid) and Alan (Derek Jacobi) plan to make the most of their time together, Caroline (Sarah Lancashire) and Kate (Nina Sosanya) settle into married life and old habits come back to haunt Gillian (Nicola Walker).

 

Part 2 of 6
Alan finally lets Celia in on his secret about Gary, but is saddened when Celia punishes Caroline on her wedding day for his mistake. Meanwhile, Gillian loses her job after a humiliating visit from Cheryl.

 

 

LAST TANGO IN HALIFAX
Season 3, Part 1 of 6

 

Enjoy the third season of this award-winning series that celebrates life and love. Celia (Anne Reid) and Alan (Derek Jacobi) plan to make the most of their time together, Caroline (Sarah Lancashire) and Kate (Nina Sosanya) settle into married life and old habits come back to haunt Gillian (Nicola Walker).

 

Part 1 of 6
An unexpected visitor forces Alan to think about his past, making Gillian and Caroline anxious. Meanwhile, Caroline and pregnant Kate set a date for their wedding.

 

 

LAST TANGO IN HALIFAX HOLIDAY SPECIAL
Part 1 of 2

 

Caroline’s new headship involves moving the family to a ramshackle farmhouse in time for Christmas. Alan has a difficult conversation with Gillian, who’s consumed by thoughts of the afterlife, convinced she’s being haunted by Eddie.

 

LAST TANGO IN HALIFAX HOLIDAY SPECIAL
Part 2 of 2

 

During the big pre-Christmas shop, Caroline tells Gillian the truth about why she had to take the new headship. Gillian’s mounting guilt over Eddie’s death drives her to make a life-changing decision. It’s the night of Celia’s play,and a twist of fate means Alan is forced to confront his fears.

 

Dick Cavett’s Vietnam

 

This program examines the war and its impact on America through the prism of interviews conducted by the iconic host of “The Dick Cavett Show,” which featured conversation and debate from all sides of the political spectrum. The program combines interviews from Cavett’s shows with archival footage, network news broadcasts and audio/visual material from the National Archives to provide insight and perspective on this controversial chapter of American history.

 

Family Ingredients Season 2

FAMILY INGREDIENTS

 

 

The six-part series airs Wednesdays at 7:30 pm through November 15.

Repeats air Wednesdays at 11:30 pm and Sundays at 4:30 pm through November 19.

 

In the second season of Emmy Award-winning series, Family Ingredients, host Ed Kenney continues celebrating Hawaiʻi’s diversity through food and untold stories. Join us as we explore food memories and family tales that open up stories of the human experience, one recipe at a time.

 

Showcasing how cuisine can profoundly unite cultures, communities, and families, Family Ingredients celebrates the diverse cultures that make up Hawai‘i’s melting pot throughout the series.

 

All photos  © Renea Veneri Stewart

 

FAMILY INGREDIENTS, Season 2. Host Ed Kenney

 

Broadcasts of Family Ingredients on PBS Hawai‘i are sponsored locally by:

 

FAMILY INGREDIENTS: California - Smoked Fish

California – Smoked Fish

Premiere: Wednesday, October 11 at 7:30 pm
Encores: Wednesday, October 11 at 11:30 pm and Sunday, October 15 at 4:30 pm

In the Season 2 premiere, singer-songwriter and surfer Jack Johnson shares memories of his father on a road trip along the California coast. Enjoy the music, smoked fish and tales about early surfer migration to Hawaiʻi.

 

FAMILY INGREDIENTS: Philippines – Adobo

Philippines – Adobo

Premiere: Wednesday, October 18 at 7:30 pm
Encores: Wednesday, October 18 at 11:30 pm and Sunday, October 22 at 4:30 pm

“Top Chef” fan favorite Sheldon Simeon makes his first trip to the Philippines. Born and raised in Hawaiʻi, Simeon credits his dad for his love of Filipino cuisine.

 

FAMILY INGREDIENTS: Fiddlehead Fern

Wisconsin – Fiddlehead Fern

Premiere: Wednesday, October 25 at 7:30 pm
Encores: Wednesday, October 25 at 11:30 pm and Sunday, October 29 at 4:30 pm

Kauaʻi farmer Valerie Kaneshiro tells a story of loss, rediscovery and lessons learned while sharing an ingredient in a dish found in Wisconsin and Hawaiʻi.

 


FAMILY INGREDIENTS: Vietnam, Ho Chi Minh City — Pho

Vietnam ‐ Ho Chi Minh City, Pho

Premiere: Wednesday, November 1 at 7:30 pm
Encores: Wednesday, November 1 at 11:30 pm and Sunday, November 5 at 4:30 pm

Vietnamese-American Chef Andrew Le is friendly, carefree, fun and funny. He is also passionate about his work, family and mother who is keeper of all the secret broths! In this episode we learn about how the Le family immigrated to Hawaiʻi after the Fall of Saigon in 1975 and became an American success story. Today they own one of the most popular restaurants in Hawaiʻi.

 

FAMILY INGREDIENTS: Vietnam, Hanoi — Pho

Vietnam ‐ Hanoi, Pho

Premiere: Wednesday, November 8 at 7:30 pm
Encores: Wednesday, November 8 at 11:30 pm and Sunday, November 12 at 4:30 pm

If you’ve been to Honolulu there is a good chance you have eaten at the Pig & the Lady in Chinatown.  One of the most popular dishes on the menu is Pho.  In this episode host Ed Kenney and the Le family travel to Hanoi to explore the origin of this simple noodle soup and end up tasting  many bowls.

 

FAMILY INGREDIENTS: Lana‘i, Hawai‘i — Venison

Lanaʻi, Hawaiʻi ‐ Venison

Premiere: Wednesday, November 15 at 7:30 pm and 11:30 pm
Encores: Wednesday, November 15 at 11:30 pm and Sunday, November 19 at 4:30 pm

Cultural pride can be found everywhere in world but on the tiny island of Lanaʻi, one woman makes it a way of life. Hula dancer and sustainable hunter Anela Evans is remarkable in many ways but it is the memory of her father and her love of all things Hawaiian that keeps this young woman committed to championing the land she walks on.

 

This series is made in Hawai‘i, by Hawai‘i talent:

A co-production of Rock Salt Media, Inc. and Pacific Islanders in Communications.

Ed Kenney – Host

Heather H. Giugni – Executive Producer

Renea Veneri Stewart – Producer

Dan Nakasone – Producer

Ty Sanga – Director

 

For more information:

FamilyIngredients.com

Family Ingredients on Facebook

Family Ingredients on Instagram

AMERICAN MASTERS
Norman Lear

 

Discover how the prolific creator of “All in the Family,” “The Jeffersons” and “Good Times” effected social change through his groundbreaking sitcoms and activism. Featuring interviews with George Clooney, Amy Poehler, Jon Stewart, Russell Simmons and Lear himself.

 

Upcoming documentary revisits New York’s Hawaiian Room

PBS Hawaii

 

In The Hawaiian Room, filmmaker Ann Marie Kirk interviews more than 20 performers who worked at the New York nightclub, which showcased Hawaiian entertainment for nearly 30 years.HONOLULU, HI – A documentary that will air on PBS Hawai‘i this month will take viewers back to The Hawaiian Room, an oasis in New York’s Lexington Hotel that showcased Hawaiian entertainment from 1937 through 1966. PBS Hawai‘i Presents: The Hawaiian Room makes its broadcast premiere Thursday, January 19 at 9:00 pm on PBS Hawai‘i.

 

In The Hawaiian Room, filmmaker Ann Marie Kirk interviews more than 20 performers who worked at the New York nightclub, which showcased Hawaiian entertainment for nearly 30 years. Photo: Hula Preservation Society Photo Collection

 

The tropical and glamorous ambiance and décor of The Hawaiian Room was largely informed by Hollywood’s fantasy of an island paradise. Filmmaker Ann Marie Kirk says that despite the glossy surface, the performers offered an honest representation of Hawai‘i.

 

“Many of them were trained by prominent kumu hula of the time,” Kirk says. “[Authenticity] still ran through everything that was done at the Hawaiian Room.”

 

The Hawaiian Room examines how, in the mid-20th century, the Hawaiian culture was represented to the world – a topic that remains a hot one. Kirk says Hawai‘i has moved past exaggerated representations of its host culture, but says “there’s still lots more work to do.”

 

“The authentic representation of Hawai‘i and Hawaiians can be tricky waters to navigate,” Kirk says. “It’s not a bad thing, just tricky.”

 

For this film, Kirk interviewed more than 20 former dancers, entertainers and patrons of The Hawaiian Room. She was surprised by the courage of the young performers – many of them females in their teens and early 20s – who relocated to New York from Hawai‘i. For many of them, it was their first time outside of the islands. “They had no ‘ohana in New York City,” Kirk said. “Yet, they created an ‘ohana in New York City with the Hawaiian Room.”

 

Kirk says that The Hawaiian Room is a story that “could have been easily lost.”

 

“Many people don’t know the significance of the Hawaiian Room and of the Hawaiians who performed there, and I think they should,” Kirk says. “It’s an amazing story.”

 

Download this Press Release

 

For questions regarding this press release:

Contact: Liberty Peralta

Email: lperalta@pbshawaii.org

Phone: 808.462.5030

 

PBS Hawai‘i is a 501(c) (3) nonprofit organization and Hawai‘i’s sole member of the trusted Public Broadcasting Service (PBS). We advance learning and discovery through storytelling that profoundly touches people’s lives. We bring the world to Hawai‘i and Hawai‘i to the world. pbshawaii.org | facebook.com/pbshawaii | @pbshawaii

 

Restoring Best Picture Quality

PBS Hawai'i: Restoring Best Picture QualityWe’ll get there. Resilience is in our DNA

 

Leslie Wilcox, President and CEO of PBS HawaiiThe people of Hawai‘i bought us a $30 million new home. You provided us a forward-looking physical plant and the stability of property ownership.

 

And, of course, you now expect us to “bring it” with more and more quality content and higher and higher production values. That’s our expectation, too!

 

The last thing you want to see is reduced picture quality on shows that you love.

 

Understood. And yet, you may have experienced intermittent pixelation (that’s when individual pixels in a digitized image stand out) and sporadic, brief audio disruptions, all since PBS Hawai‘i moved into our new home with major, new technology systems.

 

First, I want to apologize to you for the blemishes in your viewing experience. Second, I’d like to explain. Third, I want you to know we have been working constantly, and repeatedly seeking help from network specialists, to eliminate the problems. And fourth, we have reason to believe that a solution is imminent.

 

As I write this, Level 3 Communications is arranging for a larger dedicated fiber circuit to transport our content. Level 3’s service to this local public television station repeatedly fell through the cracks following the telecom giant’s $5.7 billion acquisition of our previous provider, TW Telecom. We experienced critical delays as Level 3 worked to integrate TW Telecom into its fold and laid off staff. Level 3’s challenges in absorbing TW persisted as PBS Hawai‘i relocated to our new building and launched a long-planned transformation of our engineering model.

 

Our new model is something we’re excited about, because it allows us to spend less money to distribute our programming on today’s multiple media platforms – and frees up more resources for quality content. Our new systems rely upon dedicated access to an undersea, overland fiber optic network that runs through a Joint Master Control Center, called Centralcast, in Syracuse, New York. We’re creating programming expressly for Hawai‘i while sharing “back-office” tech costs with our PBS nonprofit peers.

 

Using this data highway shouldn’t have presented roadblocks in the Age of Fiber, but timing is everything: Our contracted fiber provider, TW Telecom, found itself going through a wrenching ownership transition. We sense that the layoffs may have resulted in a loss of institutional knowledge about projects already underway. For three months since our move to our new building, we experienced new owner Level 3’s lack of communication and responsiveness while our picture and audio quality suffered.

 

“This wasn’t managed properly. I don’t know why – we know how to do this. We’ll take care of it,” Level 3’s new Hawai‘i sales director Anthony Compiseno assured us when we met for the first time on August 8. He told us that we’d been assigned an unsuitable network setting – and arranged to test higher bandwidth capability (300mb or megabits per second, versus 200mb on our existing pipe), with a “pseudowire” enhancement to protect our broadcasting content. By the time you read this, our picture quality may already have returned.

 

You and other viewers have gone through this trying time of intermittent broadcast disruptions with us.

 

PBS Hawai‘i sends you our gratitude and aloha, for your patience and your continued faith in our programming.

 

We’ll get there. Resilience is in our DNA.

 

Mahalo piha,
Leslie signature

PBS Hawai'i: Restoring Best Picture Quality

 

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