Bronx

POV SHORTS
Joe’s Violin

 

In the Oscar-nominated Joe’s Violin, a donated musical instrument forges an improbable friendship. 91-year-old Holocaust survivor Joe Feingold and 12-year-old Bronx school girl Brianna Perez show how the power of music can bring light in the darkest of times, and how a small act can have a significant impact.

 

 

 

INDEPENDENT LENS
Decade of Fire

 

Discover why the Bronx burned in the 1970s. Through rich archival and home movie footage, the film reveals the real reasons for the devastation and shows what can happen when a community chooses to fight back and reclaim their neighborhood.

 

 

 

Patricia de Stacy Harrison, a National Public Media Leader, Visits Hawaiʻi

 

CEO Message

 

Leslie Wilcox, PBS Hawai‘i President and CEO

Patricia de Stacy Harrison loved growing up in her working-class, family-centered neighborhood in Brooklyn – it was loud and caring, engaged and opinionated. “You would talk,” she told me in her visit to Honolulu last month. “And then you would wait for your next turn to talk.”

That’s one piece of her beloved Brooklyn culture she needed to un-learn in adult life. She became a very good listener – as demonstrated in a successful Washington, D.C. public relations business that she and her husband owned and operated; as a diplomat serving under then-Secretary of State Colin Powell; and for almost 15 years as President and CEO of the private nonprofit Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

 

(Left) Getting ready for GET CAUGHT READING, PBS Hawaiʻi’s new read-aloud program. Her book? A Tree Grows in Brooklyn. (Right) With Miriam Hellreich, a Board Member of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and Hawai‘i resident; Leslie; and PBS Hawaiʻi’s Board Chair Joanne Lo Grimes

Getting ready for GET CAUGHT READING, PBS Hawai‘i’s new read-aloud program. Her book? A Tree Grows in BrooklynWith Miriam Hellreich, a Board Member of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and Hawaiʻi resident; Leslie; and PBS Hawaiʻi’s Board Chair Joanne Lo Grimes

 

She was in the Islands to tour and talk with PBS Hawaiʻi, Hawaiʻi Public Radio and Pacific Islanders in Communications. She also spoke at the East-West Center, and in Kona, Hawaiʻi Island, at the Hawaiʻi Executive Conference.

 

“‘Steward’ is a very old-fashioned word but an important one because it speaks to accountability.”

Pat Harrison
President and CEO, Corporation for Public Broadcasting

 

Her job is not easy to explain. A top leader in public media, Ms. Harrison doesn’t create or distribute media. What she does is steward the federal investment in public media for PBS and NPR stations and similar nonprofit organizations across the country. The goal is to open doors of learning and opportunity. The funds generally amount to about 15 percent of a public media station’s revenues.

 

“‘Steward’ is a very old-fashioned word but an important one because it speaks to accountability. And CPB is accountable to Congress and the American people,” she said.

 

(Left) Updating the PBS Hawaiʻi Board on national initiatives. (Right) Taking the podium with East-West Center chief executive Richard Vuylsteke.

Updating the PBS Hawai‘i Board
on national initiatives
Taking the podium with East-West Center
chief executive Richard Vuylsteke

 

The core pillars of public media are education and journalism – or as Ms. Harrison is quick to specify in these roiling times in reporting, “fact-based journalism.” The so-called “Three Ds” shape the Corporation’s funding choices: Digital innovation and acceleration; Diversity of stories, talent and perspectives; and Dialogue within communities and country.

 

Under Ms. Harrison’s leadership in 2010, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting provided vital seed money for a public media start-up far from Washington, D.C. It was PBS Hawaiʻi’s own HIKI NŌ vision of convening student voices! Since then, private donors have championed HIKI NŌ, and students across the state meet PBS journalism standards and excel at national digital media competitions. The program has become a pathway to Early College.

 

Ms. Harrison looks for ways to adapt and bring about positive change.

 

She recalls something that Sir Howard Stringer, then head of Sony, said to her:

 

“We all have to remember not to hang on to the status quo long after the quo has lost its status.”

 

Says Ms. Harrison: “I have been afraid of the dreaded status quo ever since.”

Leslie signature

 

 

 

INDEPENDENT LENS
The Prison in Twelve Landscapes

 

In the United States, there are over 2 million people in prison, up from only 300,000 40 years ago. Yet for most Americans, prisons have never felt more distant or more out of sight. A cinematic journey through a series of seemingly ordinary American landscapes, this film reveals the hidden world of the modern prison system and explores lives outside the gates affected by prisons.

 

LIVE FROM LINCOLN CENTER
Act One

 

Few have captured the magic of the theatre better than Moss Hart. A poor kid from the Bronx who went on to become the writer of classic comedies with George S. Kaufman, including You Can’t Take it With You and The Man Who Came To Dinner. He also directed the original production of My Fair Lady.

 

Moss’s memoir Act One has captivated theater lovers for over 50 years. Director James Lapine has fittingly re-imagined this memoir for the stage, creating a world as vivid and transformative as the stage itself. The show features a first-rate cast led by Tony Shalhoub, Andrea Martin and Santino Fontana.

 

ART IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY
Fiction

 

Providing unique access to some of the most compelling artists of our time, Season 7 of ART IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY features a dozen artists from the United States, Europe and Latin America, and transports viewers to artistic projects across the country and around the world. In locations as diverse as a Bronx public housing project, a military testing facility in the Nevada desert, a jazz festival in Sweden and an activist neighborhood in Mexico, the artists reveal intimate and personal insights into their lives and creative processes.

 

Fiction
What makes a compelling story? Exploring the virtues of ambiguity, Omer Fast, Katharina Grosse and Joan Jonas mix genres and merge aesthetic disciplines to discern not simply what stories mean, but how and why they come to have meaning.

 

 

ART IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY
Investigation

 

Providing unique access to some of the most compelling artists of our time, Season 7 of ART IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY features a dozen artists from the United States, Europe and Latin America, and transports viewers to artistic projects across the country and around the world. In locations as diverse as a Bronx public housing project, a military testing facility in the Nevada desert, a jazz festival in Sweden and an activist neighborhood in Mexico, the artists reveal intimate and personal insights into their lives and creative processes.


Investigation
Can acts of engagement and exploration be works of art in themselves‌ Leonardo Drew, Thomas Hirschhorn and Graciela Iturbide use their practices as tools for personal and intellectual discovery, simultaneously documenting and producing new realities in the process.