Bully

PACIFIC HEARTBEAT
Making Good Men

PACIFIC HEARTBEAT: Making Good Men – Former rugby player Norm Hewitt (left) and Hollywood actor Manu Bennett (right)

 

Two high-profile New Zealanders – former rugby player Norm Hewitt (left) and Hollywood actor Manu Bennett (right) – reveal their experiences with bullying with unprecedented honesty. Instead of highlighting blame or humiliation, the film focuses on the path to redemption, reconciliation and restoration.

 

 

 

 

 

INDEPENDENT LENS
Kumu Hina

 

Over the course of a momentous year, Kumu Hina, a native Hawaiian mahu (transgender) teacher, inspires a tomboyish young girl to claim her place as leader of an all-male hula troupe, as Kumu Hina herself searches for love and a fulfilling romantic relationship with an unpredictable young Tongan man.

 

HIKI NŌ
The first all-Middle School edition

 

This episode is the first all-Middle School edition of HIKI NŌ.

 

Top Story
Students from Maui Waena Intermediate School on Maui tell the story of their experience at the 2015 Student Television Network conference and video competition in San Diego, California, where they learned that it is far better to give than to receive. Although the primary purpose of their trip was to participate in the video competition, they also spent a great deal of time volunteering for worthy San Diego-based causes. Maui Waena students cleared half an acre of weeds and invasive plants from Balboa Park, the largest urban park in San Diego. They also served meals to 300 homeless people at the city’s largest homeless shelter, Father Joe’s Village. The Maui Waena students went on to win several awards at the competition, but they consider their hours of community service as the most rewarding part of the trip.

 

Also Featured:
Students from Aliamanu Middle School on Oahu report on the sometimes frightening transition from Middle School to High School.

 

Students from Waipahu Intermediate School on Oahu tell the story of a diabetic teacher at their school who is educating others about the disease.

 

Students at Seabury Hall Middle School on Maui profile their marching band director Richie Franco and his unconventional journey from the tough streets of Chicago to teaching music in Makawao, Maui.

 

Students at Waianae Intermediate School on Oahu tell the story of a student with a limp brought on by a medical condition that made her a target for bullies. With the support of friends and her own upbeat outlook, she is now moving forward to a positive future.

 

Students at Kapaa Middle School on Kauai invite us to their school’s Electives Night – a unique evening of student art and performances that excites not only students and their parents, but the entire community as well.

 

Students at Lahaina Intermediate School on Maui tell the story of a special garden on campus that is encouraging teachers and students alike to take their lessons outdoors.

 

This program encores Saturday, May 30 at 12:30 pm and Sunday, May 31 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

Hafu

 

This documentary examines the intricacies of mixed-race Japanese and their multicultural experience in modern day Japan. The film follows the lives of five hafus – the Japanese term for people who are half-Japanese – as they explore what it means to be multiracial and multicultural in a nation that once proudly proclaimed itself as the mono-ethnic nation. For some of these hafus, Japan is the only home they know, for some living in Japan is an entirely new experience, and others are caught somewhere between two different worlds.

 

 

 

 

INDEPENDENT LENS
Bully

 

This cinematic, character-driven documentary puts a human face on the devastating impacts of the most common form of violence experienced by young people in the nation. At its heart are those with huge stakes in the issue: five kids and families whose stories each represent a different facet of America’s bullying epidemic. The film, shot over the course of one school year, opens a window onto the pained and often endangered lives of bullied kids, revealing a problem that transcends geographic, racial, ethnic and economic borders. It documents the responses of teachers and administrators to aggressive behaviors that defy “kids will be kids” clichés and captures a growing movement among parents and youths to change how bullying is handled in schools, communities and society as a whole.