Cambodia

JOSEPH ROSENDO’S TRAVELSCOPE
Mekong River Adventure, Part 2 of 2

 

Part 2 of Joseph’s Mekong River journey through Cambodia and Vietnam finds him in the Cambodian capital of Phnom Penh where he embarks on a tuk-tuk tour of the city’s highlights. He visits the royal palace with its stupas, pagodas and pavilions and pays homage to the country’s spiritual heritage, as well as its colonial past. In local markets and restaurants where the fare can range from lobsters to tarantulas, he learns how, with the help of foreign NGOs, the country is recovering from its devastating Khmer Rouge history of war and ruin. Then Joseph follows the Mekong’s flow into Vietnam where the Mekong River Delta spreads its seven arms across Southwest Vietnam. Here in the countryside towns, river villages and floating markets he experiences post-war Vietnamese life. As Joseph’s Mekong River voyage ends he understands that after centuries of struggle, at the core of Cambodia and Vietnam’s resurgence are their resiliente people who have overcome the unimaginable time and time again and are now ready to greet the world with open arms.

 

 

FAKE OR FORTUNE?
Rodin

FAKE OR FORTUNE? Rodin

 

Beyond the genteel galleries and upmarket auction houses of the art world lies a darker dimension: a world of incalculable wealth, social ambition, and occasional subterfuge. Detective Philip Mould, journalist Fiona Bruce and a team of scientists investigate a new batch of potential fine art forgeries.

 

Rodin
The team examines a sketch of a Cambodian dancer that is attributed to the artist Auguste Rodin, best known for his sculptures.

 

 

POV
The Storm Makers

 

Featuring brutally candid testimony, this film is a chilling exposé of Cambodia’s human trafficking underworld and an eye-opening look at the complex cycle of poverty, despair and greed that fuels this brutal modern slave trade. More than half a million Cambodians work abroad and a staggering third of these have been sold as slaves. Most are young women, held prisoner and forced to work in horrific conditions, sometimes as prostitutes, in Malaysia, Thailand and Taiwan.

 

The story is told from the perspectives of a former slave whose return home is greeted with bitterness and scorn by her mother; a successful trafficker – known in Cambodia as a “storm maker” for the havoc he and his cohorts wreak – who works with local recruiters to funnel a steady stream of poor and illiterate young people across borders; and a mother who has sold to the recruiter not only local girls, but also her own daughter.

 

The Day the ‘60s Died

 

The aftermath of the shooting deaths of four college students at Kent State on May 4, 1970 has been called the most divisive moment in American history since the Civil War. This compelling documentary returns to that turbulent spring 45 years ago to take a new perspective on the incident and what followed by exploring how three very different worlds – U.S. college campuses, the jungles of Cambodia and the Nixon White House – collided during that month in 1970.