center

SLOVAKIA:
Treasures in the Heart of Europe

 

A country of lush forests and mountains surrounded by hidden hills, Slovakia is a land rich with historical and cultural treasures. Explore the country’s breathtaking landscapes, ancient castles, historic cathedrals, the Andy Warhol Museum, music and dance festivals, traditional villages, national parks and treks in the Tatra Mountains.

 

 

Ex Libris:
The New York Public Library

 

Frederick Wiseman’s film, Ex Libris – The New York Public Library, goes behind the scenes of one of the greatest knowledge institutions in the world and reveals it as a place of welcome, cultural exchange and learning. With 92 branches throughout Manhattan, the Bronx and Staten Island, the library is a resource for all the inhabitants of this multifaceted and cosmopolitan city, and beyond.

 

 

Fact-Based Reporting, Without Fear or Favor

 

CEO Message

Fact-Based Reporting, Without Fear or Favor

 

Leslie Wilcox, PBS Hawai‘i President and CEOI first took note of war correspondent Christiane Amanpour back in the early 1990s when I saw her on cable channel CNN, running across a crowded street in Bosnia with sniper fire ringing out.

 

It wasn’t only her risk-taking that arrested me; it was her unflinching reports on a different kind of war. This wasn’t an army versus an army. It was a war against civilians.

 

More than two decades later, she would say: “I learned…when I was covering genocide and ethnic cleansing in Bosnia, never to equate victim and aggressor, never to create a false moral or factual equivalence.”

 

“When lies become mixed up with the truth, it’s a very dangerous world.” – Christiane Amanpour“Because then, if you do, particularly in situations like that,” she said, “you are party and accomplice to the most unspeakable crimes and consequences.”

 

“So,” she concluded, “I believe in being truthful, not neutral.”

 

Amanpour, who is now CNN’s Chief International Correspondent, interviews global leaders and decision-makers on PBS every weeknight at 11:00. Her program, Amanpour on PBS, joined the programming line-up after PBS stopped distributing programs with Charlie Rose, following multiple women’s allegations of sexual harassment.

 

Amanpour, who turns 59 this month, is a British citizen who spent her early years in Tehran. She is the product of a Muslim father from Iran and a Christian mother from England – and she’s married to a Jewish American, former U.S. diplomat Jamie Rubin. They live in London with their teenage son, Darius.

 

“I’ve lived in a completely multi-cultural, multi-ethnic, multi-religious environment, in some of the most difficult places in the world,” Amanpour has said.

 

“I’ve seen firsthand that you can bridge differences, you can have tolerance between groups. The trick is to minimize the extremes, whether it’s in politics or in religion or in any kind of relationship, and to stick to the sensible center, which is where the vast majority, not only of this country but the world, lies,” she says.

 

Amanpour also has a knack for bridging between television networks and countries. She will remain with CNN in Britain while sharing her interviews with PBS in America.

 

She urges all journalists to re-commit to robust, fact-based reporting on the issues – without fear and without favor.

 

“When lies become mixed up with the truth,” she said, “it’s a very dangerous world.”

 

Almost three decades after Christiane dodged bullets in the Balkans, she’s sitting down in the studio with world power players. I still find her coverage arresting. And the truth is worth staying up for. See you at 11:00 weeknights, “Amanpour on PBS.”

 

Aloha nui,

 

Leslie signature

10 Buildings that Changed America

 

Geoffrey Baer hosts this survey of 10 influential buildings in a cross-country journey of American architecture. Meet the daring architects who imagined them and learn the stories of how they came to change the way we live, work, worship, learn, shop and play.

 

HIKI NŌ
Top Story: H.P. Baldwin High School – HC&S (Hawaii Commercial and Sugar) employees

 

TOP STORY:

 

Students from H.P. Baldwin High School in Wailuku, Maui present poignant portraits of two long-time HC&S (Hawaii Commercial and Sugar) employees: machinist Wes Bissen and millwright Koa Martin. HC&S is the last remaining sugar mill in Hawaii and will be closing at the end of 2016. The mill opened 144 years ago. The closure will result in 675 employees losing their jobs.

 

Martin’s father and grandfather worked for HC&S before him. Bissen started working at HC&S in 1981. His father was also a machinist for the company. The two reflect on their careers at HC&S and their families’ histories with the company. They also discuss the state funds being allotted to help the laid off workers through the transition. Says Bissen, “You know, it’s sad that they’re going to close, but we’re all big boys. We’ve got to focus on how it’s going to affect everybody and just try to build a better life from here on.”

 

ALSO FEATURED:

 

Students from Kapolei High School on Oahu tell the story of their annual basketball event for Best Buddies, a program that helps to integrate students with intellectual and mental disabilities into the social fabric of the school.

 

Students from Aliamanu Middle School in the Salt Lake district of Oahu take us behind the scenes of their school’s nerve center – the front office.

 

Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle introduce us to a surfer- turned-chef who runs the popular Like Poke food truck on Maui.

 

Students from Kapaa Middle School on Kauai tell us about a community organization that feels they have one solution to Kauai’s feral cat problem.

 

And students from Maui Waena Intermediate School in Kahului, Maui show us how a married couple is living out its golden years at a Maui senior day care center.

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by Mililani High School in Central Oahu.

 

This program encores Saturday, July 2 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, July 3 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

Burt Wolf: Travels & Traditions
Hong Kong, Part Two

Burt Wolf: Travels & Traditions - Hong Kong, Part Two

 

Burt explains the history of dim sum, “speed tailoring” and the origin of the escalator. He also takes us on a visit to an old police barracks that has been changed into one of Hong Kong’s sleekest shopping areas and to the highest peak in Hong Kong.

 

Burt Wolf: Travels & Traditions
Hong Kong, Part One

 

Burt returns to Hong Kong for his 10th visit and takes a look at how things have changed. He explains the history of the gold fish, takes us on a ride around Victoria Harbor, describes the history of the Chinese Junk, and uncovers the power of a Feng Shui master.

 

We’ve Moved!

 

New construction is underway, but we are still seeking donations for PBS Hawaii’s NEW HOME.

 

To learn more about our NEW HOME Campaign, click here.

 

We thank you for your interest in supporting Hawaii’s only public television station, a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization offering local and national programming. Mahalo!