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HIKI NŌ
Unified Sports

 

TOP STORY

 

“Unified Sports”
Students from Maui High School in Kahului feature fellow student Britney Bautista. Britney, who has a developmental delay syndrome, has gained a sense of belonging through the school’s Special Olympics Unified Sports program. This program brings students with and without disabilities together to participate in sports, socials, and other extracurricular activities. Britney is also one of only twelve U.S. youth ambassadors to the Special Olympics, which gives her a voice to advocate for the advancement of inclusive youth leadership. “My goal is to introduce Special Olympics to the younger generation,” says Britney. “I want them to learn that everyone is the same, and nobody should be judged by what their physical characteristics look like.”

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

Students from Hawaiʻi Preparatory Academy in Waimea on Hawaiʻi Island introduce us to a wahine paniolo champion.

 

Students from Hilo Intermediate School on Hawaiʻi Island tell the story of a bone marrow donor in Hilo who discovered that the recipient of his bone marrow lives just a few minutes away from him.

 

Students from Hawaiʻi Technology Academy on Oʻahu profile Hawaiʻi’s fledgling ice hockey league.

 

Students from Waiākea High School on Hawaiʻi Island tell the story of a dedicated group of dog lovers who place homeless canines with their new, forever owners.

 

Students from Mililani High School in Central Oʻahu share a public service announcement about simple changes people can make that will have a positive impact on life in Hawaiʻi.

 

Plus, a montage of HIKI NŌ stories from Saint Francis School on Oʻahu, whose 95-year-old history is ending at the close of this school year.

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ also features students’ profiles on their HIKI NŌ teachers.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode #1004 – Pedestrian Perils and other stories

HIKI NŌ: Episode #1004 - Pedestrian Perils and other stories

 

TOP STORY

 

Students from Āliamanu Middle School in the Salt Lake district of O‘ahu re-visit an issue they reported on for HIKI NŌ over six years ago: the pedestrian hazards around their campus and the campus of Āliamanu Elementary School. Most of Salt Lake Boulevard is a four-lane City & County road. But for a one-mile stretch, beginning at the two Āliamanu campuses, the road narrows to two lanes, increasing traffic congestion right in front of the schools. Adding to the problem is the fact that there is a popular shopping center across from the schools, which acts as a lure for students to cross the busy boulevard. In April of 2012, when Āliamanu Middle School’s first report on this subject aired, plans were in place to widen the stretch of Salt Lake Boulevard adjacent to the schools as part of the rail project. Since then, the rail route has shifted from Salt Lake to the airport, and the Salt Lake Boulevard widening project has fallen to the wayside. The original 2012 story will also be aired to provide context for the current story and to show how little has been done about the problem in the ensuing six years.

 

Program

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

–Students from Kalani High School in east O‘ahu show us how to get something we all need: a better night’s sleep.

 

–Students from Hawai‘i Preparatory Academy in the Waimea district of Hawai‘i Island give us the ins and outs of their keiki triathlon.

 

–Students from Sacred Hearts Academy on O‘ahu explore how their generation feels about ecology and the environment.

 

–Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School in Upcountry Maui tell the story of an Alabama transplant who marches to the beat of a different drum.

 

–Students from Wai‘anae High School in West O‘ahu take us to the last remaining dairy farm on O‘ahu.

 

–Students from ‘Ewa Makai Middle School on O‘ahu profile a young woman who uses dance to hold her life together.

 

 

NATURE
Cold Warriors: Wolves and Buffalo

 

For thousands of years, wolves hunted buffalo across the vast North American plains, until the westward settlement of the continent saw the virtual extinction of these vast herds and their eternal predators. However, this ancient relationship was not lost altogether and continues uninterrupted in only one location: the northern edge of Canada’s central plains in a place named Wood Buffalo National Park. Today, the descendants of those ancient buffalo and wolves still engage in epic life-and-death dramas across this northern land. Their story is captured in thrilling cinematic glory by a lone filmmaker who has followed them for more than 20 years.