Chair

What if… ? Post-it® notes full of questions

 

CEO Message

 

What if... ? Post it® notes full of questions. Ian Kitajima, Chair, new PBS Hawaii Board Committee on Innovation/Futures

Ian Kitajima, Chair, new PBS Hawai‘i Board Committee on Innovation/Futures

 

Leslie Wilcox, PBS Hawai‘i President and CEOAlbert Einstein might have gotten a kick out of attending a monthly meeting of our newest Board committee. After all, he said:

 

“If I had an hour to solve a problem and my life depended on the solution, I would spend the first 55 minutes determining the proper question to ask – for once I knew the proper question, I could solve the problem in less than five minutes.”

 

Our Board Committee on Innovation/Futures may be as passionate about questions as Dr. Einstein, but its questions are a group discipline and the pace tends to be fast. One committee member’s question will ignite a question from another member, and so on. Questions are jotted down as soon as they come to mind. In three monthly meetings so far, the committee has filled up enough Post-it notes to paper a small room.

 

Question after question after question: “Who defines quality and what is it?”; “Does high quality equate to sustainability?”; Will the need to consume fast media outweigh the need for quality media?”; “What are our metrics? Do we need new ones?”; “What are the new distribution models and their impact?”; “What is the best use of LIVE?”; “Where is the intersection between public service and innovation?”

 

PBS Hawai‘i Board Chair Jason Fujimoto established this new Board committee to discern opportunities and threats amid the disruptions in a world of rapid change.

 

Committee Chair Ian Kitajima, who explains his day job as a “tech sherpa” at problem-solving company Oceanit, says his approach is to get out of the rut of common assumptions and sharpen the questions. His committee is mostly composed of non-Board members who hold jobs in strategy and are veterans of training in design thinking. Some staffers participate, too.

 

Design thinking seeks to understand users, challenge assumptions and redefine problems, in trying to identify alternate strategies and solutions. Let’s see what they come up with in reimagining elements of your PBS Hawai‘i.

 

Mahalo to members of Ian’s PBS Hawai‘i Board Committee on Innovation/Futures: Stacy Clayton, Brian Dote, Justin Hernandez (California), Aaron Kagawa, Ryan Kanno (Japan), Kevin Kawahara, Ravi Pare and Huy Vo.

 

We can’t claim Dr. Einstein as a committee member, but his attitude permeates the room: “The important thing is not to stop questioning…. Never lose a holy curiosity.”

 

Aloha nui,

Leslie signature


 

 

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW
Seattle, WA, Part 3 of 3

 

Highlights from the Roadshow floor in Seattle include a late-16th-century diamond and enamel jewel; a moose, elk and buffalo hide chair; and a Steiff clown bear worth $2,500-$3,200.

 

Full of Memories and Full of Thanks

Leslie Wilcox, President and CEO of PBS Hawai‘iAs you read this, the PBS Hawai‘i staff will have re-assembled across town in our new home for storytelling and community building, a beautiful work environment created and built by the support of our fellow Islanders.

 

It’s a cheerful place that promotes transparency – there are no cubicles, just open space with desk groupings and a lot of glass walls. It’s designed, by architect Sheryl Seaman of Group 70 International, for teamwork and collaboration.

 

One immediate favorite spot is nicknamed Team Space – it’s a long farm table where staffers can get together for lunch breaks or have work discussions, using a “writable” wall.

 

To get to this open environment, we had to pack up our longtime rented home on the campus of the University of Hawaii at Manoa. It was easy deciding which technology and office equipment to take. What “got” to us is the dilemma that faces almost everyone who moves: What do you do with stacks of memorabilia that are a nod to precious times and achievements?

 

First, our storehouses of past decades of programming, with people and places of a Hawaii gone by, held in outdated media formats: Chris Lee and Heather Giugni, co-founders of ‘Ulu‘ulu: The Henry Ku‘ualoha Giugni Archive, settled that for us by welcoming our material. They’ll do their magic to make programs accessible to online viewers and researchers.

 

Second, the trophies, accolades, and photographs from over 50 years of public television in Hawai‘i: We had a display cabinet of trophies and ceremonial gifts, and walls with framed acknowledgements. And there were plaques and certificates tucked away elsewhere – just too many congratulatory items, over the five decades, to showcase. We decided to create a pictorial and written record of all of them to take with us. A number were selected to be part of our new streamlined environment.

 

And so here we are, full of memories and full of thanks.

 

Our staff serves with the knowledge that we stand on the shoulders of excellent professionals and many caring, akamai citizens who’ve come before us. We intend to carry that same torch of education in this collaborative new space, upholding PBS Hawai‘i as a community connector that reaches into homes and hearts with authentic storytelling that touches, and even changes, lives.

 

As Board Chair Robbie Alm says, “I am very excited at all the opportunities the new building represents and I will also carry the spirit of our Dole Street (Manoa) building with me always.”

 

I mua! (Moving forward)
Leslie signature
Full of Memories and Full of Thanks