character

THE WIDOWER
Part 1 of 3

THE WIDOWER: Part 1 of 3

 

“The Widower” is the three-part true story of Malcolm Webster — an infamous wife-killer who marries, and then attempts to kill, a succession of woman to mask his debts and cash in on their life insurance policies. Webster, a nurse by profession, is on the surface, a perfect gentleman. Well-­spoken, personable and oozing with charm, he marries first wife, Claire Morris, in 1993. However, a year after her dream wedding, Claire is dead — the apparent victim of a tragic road accident. What no one knows at the time is that Webster has spent the entire marriage plying his unsuspecting wife with sedatives. He aims to keep her in a constant state of fatigue and drowsiness to prevent her from questioning his wild spending habits or mounting debts. But with his debtors closing in on him, he decides to silence his wife once and for all  by killing her in a staged car accident that will pay him a life insurance policy that will resolve his financial difficulties.

 

Preview

 

Part 1 of 3
When Claire Morris (Sheridan Smith) confronts her new husband, Malcolm Webster (Reece Shearsmith) over his wild spending, he tries to control her with sedatives. Afraid he’ll soon be caught, he silences her once and for all. Three years on, he has a new bride…and history appears to be repeating itself.

 

 

 

THE WIDOWER
Part 2 of 3

THE WIDOWER: Part 2 of 3

 

“The Widower” is the three-part true story of Malcolm Webster — an infamous wife-killer who marries, and then attempts to kill, a succession of woman to mask his debts and cash in on their life insurance policies. Webster, a nurse by profession, is on the surface, a perfect gentleman. Well-­spoken, personable and oozing with charm, he marries first wife, Claire Morris, in 1993. However, a year after her dream wedding, Claire is dead — the apparent victim of a tragic road accident. What no one knows at the time is that Webster has spent the entire marriage plying his unsuspecting wife with sedatives. He aims to keep her in a constant state of fatigue and drowsiness to prevent her from questioning his wild spending habits or mounting debts. But with his debtors closing in on him, he decides to silence his wife once and for all  by killing her in a staged car accident that will pay him a life insurance policy that will resolve his financial difficulties.

 

Preview

 

Part 2 of 3
After two failed attempts on Felicity’s (Kate Fleetwood) life, Malcolm (Reece Shearsmith) returns to Scotland and reinvents himself — this time as a perfect boyfriend to Simone (Archie Panjabi). However, DS Henry (John Hannah) is hot on his heels and will stop at nothing to prevent the next murder.

 

 

 

THE WIDOWER
Part 3 of 3

THE WIDOWER: Part 3 of 3

 

“The Widower” is the three-part true story of Malcolm Webster — an infamous wife-killer who marries, and then attempts to kill, a succession of woman to mask his debts and cash in on their life insurance policies. Webster, a nurse by profession, is on the surface, a perfect gentleman. Well-­spoken, personable and oozing with charm, he marries first wife, Claire Morris, in 1993. However, a year after her dream wedding, Claire is dead — the apparent victim of a tragic road accident. What no one knows at the time is that Webster has spent the entire marriage plying his unsuspecting wife with sedatives. He aims to keep her in a constant state of fatigue and drowsiness to prevent her from questioning his wild spending habits or mounting debts. But with his debtors closing in on him, he decides to silence his wife once and for all  by killing her in a staged car accident that will pay him a life insurance policy that will resolve his financial difficulties.

 

Preview

 

Part 3 of 3
As Malcolm (Reece Shearsmith) continues to evade capture and plots to bigamously marry Simone (Archie Panjabi), DS Henry (John Hannah) is being thwarted at every step of his investigation. Time is running out when he stumbles across a legal ruling that could ultimately lead to Malcolm’s downfall.

 

 

 

Won’t You Be My Neighbor?

Won't You Be My Neighbor? Fred Rogers (left) with Francois Scarborough Clemmons (right) in an episode of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood

 

One of the most celebrated theatrical releases of 2018, this feature length documentary takes an intimate look at America’s favorite neighbor: Fred Rogers. The film tells the story of a soft-spoken minister, puppeteer, writer and producer whose show was beamed daily into homes across America for more than 30 years. In his beloved television program, Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood, Rogers and his cast of puppets and friends spoke directly to young children about some of life’s weightiest issues in a simple, direct fashion. There hadn’t been anything like Mister Rogers on television before, and there hasn’t been since.

 

Preview

 

 

 

Leadership Takeaways from Long Story Short

 

CEO Message

 

Leadership Takeaways from Long Story Short
 

Leslie Wilcox, PBS Hawai‘i President and CEOI wish wisdom were contagious, like colds. If so, my Long Story Short team and I would be wise beyond our dreams. Over the last decade, we’ve been face to face with well over 200 leaders and interesting citizens, listening to their personal stories of success and failure and lessons learned. As we look ahead to a new year and new resolve, I thought I’d share with you a few leadership traits and skills touched upon by guests on the program:

Ability to Distill What’s Most Important

The outgoing he'd of Punahou School, Dr. Jim ScottThis is the ability to filter ideas and aspirations through the context of one’s purpose, goals and resources.

 

Example: The outgoing head of Punahou School, Dr. Jim Scott, deals with students, teachers, parents, administrators, donors, alumni, trustees and untold complexities. Every day, he said, every third person who walks into his office has a great idea for him.

 

How does he set a course? He recalls his baseball days. As a student athlete at Punahou and Stanford University, he was better at pitching than hitting. When he became a teacher who also coached baseball and he wanted to know more about hitting, he picked up a book by one of the greatest hitters of all time, Ted Williams. Williams wrote that the secret is knowing what pitches to let go.

 

Dr. Scott said: “I got to thinking about the Ted Williams School of Management and wondering what pitches not to swing at, which good ideas do you not go for…From where I sit in my office, I’m looking for synergy, congruence. I’m kind of a broker of ideas, and when I see patterns and recurring themes, they become good. And that’s why an idea sometimes takes time to bake, to form.”

 

Battle-hardened Confidence

Former CEO of Hawaiian Airlines Mark DunkerleyThis is the conviction that you can and will make a tough decision, because you’ve done it before.

 

Example: Mark Dunkerley, the former CEO of Hawaiian Airlines, a brilliant strategist and turn-around master in a fiercely competitive industry, commented: “I’m always struck by how difficult a time people have in making decisions. Making decisions, based in part on analysis, but never with perfect information, and largely based on the accumulation of one’s personal experience, is something that I’ve always felt comfortable with. That’s not something that keeps me awake at night.”

Fearlessness

Civil rights Icon Minnijean Brown TrickeyThis is a willingness to take bold action, even though it turns the status quo upside down or inside out.

 

Example: Civil rights icon Minnijean Brown Trickey, visiting Hawai‘i from Arkansas, was one of the Little Rock Nine – nine African American teenagers who in 1957 integrated a white school, Central High, amid riots. They kept going to school despite hatred and harassment.

 

“Somebody had to do it,” Trickey said. Explaining that the civil rights movement was youthdriven, she said: “The young people were doing things that the grown-ups couldn’t do, because in fact they would lose their jobs. And they didn’t put us there, we put ourselves there and asked them to come with us. There’s a line in a freedom song (that says) ‘if you don’t go, don’t hinder me.’ And another line is, ‘If my mama don’t go, I’ll go anyhow.’ It was about seeing a different vision, and hoping that it didn’t stay the same.”

 

There are many life takeaways in the Long Story Short files, and I’ll bring you more from time to time. Also, I invite you to view or read transcripts of the interviews on our website at pbshawaii.org/lss

 

We at PBS Hawai‘i are grateful to you, as a loyal supporter, for helping to provide this rich resource.

 

Season’s Aloha

Leslie signature


 

 

THE GREAT AMERICAN READ
Who Am I?

 

Explore the ways that America’s best-loved novels answer the age-old question, “Who am I?” From life lessons to spiritual journeys, these books help us understand our own identities and find our place in the world.

 

 

Latest KĀKOU Town Hall Hits a Nerve

 

CEO Message

Latest KĀKOU Town Hall Hits a Nerve
KĀKOU Town Hall Guests: Māhealani Perez-Wendt, Mike Irish and Aaron Salā

KĀKOU Town Hall Guests: Māhealani Perez-Wendt, Mike Irish and Aaron Salā

 

We did something a little different at the second KĀKOU Town Hall, televised and streamed live for two hours on PBS Hawai‘i April 19.

 

Mostly, we let the conversation unfold naturally. This wasn’t a shout-‘em-down event; it was a respectful Hawai‘i discussion in which people from different backgrounds and perspectives mulled quality-of-life answers.

 

Our topic was The Global Squeeze: How Do We Keep Hawai‘i Hawai‘i? Thirty-eight thoughtful invitees gathered, 16 of them Neighbor Islanders.

 

Participants were quick to point out that many residents, especially Native Hawaiians, are feeling that they need to leave Hawai‘i, as they weigh earnings against sky-high housing prices and a heavy burden of state and local taxes. Some characterized tourism as a perpetual engine that is running unchecked.

 

Back row, from left: Hank Adaniya, Rob Stephenson, Edward Wendt, Māhealani Perez-Wendt, Keoni Lee, Lori McCarney, Kealoha Hooper, Sabra Kauka, Mike Irish, Maenette Benham, Puna Dawson, Kepa Maly, Jan Harada, Tom Raffipiy, T. Ilihia Gionson, Corie Tanida, David DeRauf, Danny Goya and Peter Adler. Middle row: Denise Laitinen, Kit Zulueta, Mark Doo, Jon Osorio, Mike Buck, Kainoa Horcajo, Marlene Booth, Aaron Salā, Candy Suiso, Mark Suiso, Daphne Barbee-Wooten, Jay Fidell, Olin Lagon and Ekela Crozier. Front row: Jennifer Suzuki, Leslie Wilcox, Rebecca Meyer, Eric Enos, Skylark Rossetti and Craig Takamine.

Back row, from left: Hank Adaniya, Rob Stephenson, Edward Wendt, Māhealani Perez-Wendt, Keoni Lee, Lori McCarney, Kealoha Hooper, Sabra Kauka, Mike Irish, Maenette Benham, Puna Dawson, Kepa Maly, Jan Harada, Tom Raffipiy, T. Ilihia Gionson, Corie Tanida, David DeRauf, Danny Goya and Peter Adler. Middle row: Denise Laitinen, Kit Zulueta, Mark Doo, Jon Osorio, Mike Buck, Kainoa Horcajo, Marlene Booth, Aaron Salā, Candy Suiso, Mark Suiso, Daphne Barbee-Wooten, Jay Fidell, Olin Lagon and Ekela Crozier. Front row: Jennifer Suzuki, Leslie Wilcox, Rebecca Meyer, Eric Enos, Skylark Rossetti and Craig Takamine.

 

A high school junior, Rebecca Meyer, expects to move away. She noted that she’s never visited some special places on her home island of O‘ahu, because tourists are overrunning them.

 

The Dean of the UH Hawai‘inuiākea School of Hawaiian Knowledge, Dr. Jon Osorio, said, “We need to have political and economic change if Hawaiians are going to stay here. And honestly, if Hawaiians disappear from here, it isn’t Hawai‘i anymore.”

 

Dr. Maenette Benham, UH-West O‘ahu Chancellor, said that what keeps Hawai‘i Hawai‘i is the cultural values that young people hold in their na‘au, or gut, and how they use them as a driving force to uplift community.

 

Jay Fidell reminded everyone that cost-of-living anxiety dates back decades. “How do you convert that into recognizing the sea change and doing something about it?”

 

T. Ilihia Gionson of Kona said a good next step is voting in the upcoming election for a worthy candidate – “and if you don’t see one, maybe it’s supposed to be you.”

 

Māhealani Perez-Wendt of Hana, Maui, prefaced her answer by saying it’s “sensitive” and usually not discussed “in mixed company” – meaning Native Hawaiians and non-Native Hawaiians.

 

“What I hear in this room is a sense of resignation,” she said. She advocates Hawaiian sovereignty as an “agenda of survival.”

 

Her husband, taro farmer Ed Wendt, agreed: “This is deep, deeper than you think.”

 

A younger Hawaiian by a generation, Keoni Lee, offered that sovereignty should be viewed by non-Hawaiians as an opportunity, not a threat, as Native Hawaiians can lead the way in sustainability practices that once made their homeland flourish.

 

Maui’s Kainoa Horcajo preferred to call this “home rule” rather than sovereignty. He said, “It’s not just a kānaka thing, it’s a kākou thing…That is the way we truly solve all of these problems.”

 

Peter Adler, a professional in conflict resolution, listened intently during the program but chose not to speak. He told me later: “In certain settings, a shut mouth gathers no foot.”

 

You can find this discussion online at pbshawaii.org. Look for our next KĀKOU Town Hall this fall.

 

Aloha nui,

Leslie signature

Leslie Wilcox
President and CEO
PBS Hawai‘i

 

 

KĀKOU – Hawai‘i’s Town Hall
The Global Squeeze: How Do We Keep Hawaiʻi Hawaiʻi?

 

In our second live town hall, we pause to consider where we are, and where we want to be. Change is inevitable. Some changes come quietly, incrementally, over years; others seem to emerge all of a sudden and nearly full-blown. How is Hawai‘i changing – for better, for worse, or both?

 

This is not a conversation about major controversial events that have been dividing our community. This is not a conversation about pro-this, or anti-that. This is a discussion about the finer details of life in Hawai‘i that affect our sense of place. What details compromise the core essence of Hawai‘i – and where are we willing to draw the line?

 

We’ve invited 40 individuals from across the state to participate in this frank, respectful and community-based discussion in our studio. We invite you to join the conversation through email and social media, using the hashtag #pbskakou. You can watch the live broadcast on PBS Hawai‘i, or the live stream on pbshawaii.org and PBS Hawai‘i’s Facebook page.

 


<< Return to the KĀKOU home page.

 

 



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