Chinese

AMERICAN EXPERIENCE
The Chinese Exclusion Act

 

Examine the origin, history and impact of the 1882 law that made it illegal for Chinese workers to come to America and for Chinese nationals already here to ever become U.S. citizens. The law remained in force for more than 60 years.

 

 

PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS
Keola Beamer: Mālama Ko Aloha (Keep Your Love)

PBS HAWAII PRESENTS: Keola Beamer: Mālama Ko Aloha (Keep Your Love)

 

This program tells the story of Keola Beamer’s journey through song. The respected composer and slack key guitarist partners with an array of musicians, including Native American flutist R. Carlos Nakai, American jazz pianist Geoffrey Keezer and Hawaiian vocalist Raiatea Helm. These collaborations demonstrate how one can retain cultural identity while openly sharing with others to create something new – a global art form. This multicultural exchange reaches its zenith when Beamer performs a Hawaiian-language version of John Lennon’s “Imagine,” with musicians playing traditional Hawaiian, Chinese, Japanese, Australian, Classical European and American Jazz instruments. In another particularly moving segment, Keola accompanies his wife Moanalani Beamer as she performs a hula as a quadriplegic woman who magically regains use of her limbs in a dream.

 

 

GLOBE TREKKER
Food Hour: Southern China

GLOBE TREKKER - Food Hour: Southern China

 

Celebrated New Zealand chef Peter Gordon discovers the roots of Cantonese cuisine. Peter’s journey takes him north to Lianzhou, the mountain home of the Yao tribe, where he cooks succulent spiced pork. Next he walks the rice fields of the Pearl River Delta, and meets traditional medical doctors in Foshan. He also cooks up a strength-giving feast for dragon boat racing crews in Guangzhou, shops in the fabled market of Qingping and samples street fare in Chaozhou.

 

 

SAMANTHA BROWN’S PLACES TO LOVE
Xi’an, China

 

It’s been a decade since I last visited Xi’an, China, and it felt so good to be back. Founded in the 11th Century BC, every ancient building, bridge and tradition boggles the mind. I started out with leisurely bike ride atop the ancient City Wall, stopped at a traditional Chinese medicine clinic (practicing for over 500 years) to cure my jet-lag, and paid a visit to the UNESCO World Heritage site of the Terra-cotta Warriors. Add in a spectacular outdoor performance of The Song of the Everlasting Sorrow and incredible street food, and you’ll see why Xi’an is a place to love.

 

 

JOSEPH ROSENDO’S TRAVELSCOPE
Taiwan Matsu Festival and Islands

 

Joseph returns to Taiwan to follow in the path of Taiwan’s Matsu Pilgrimage, said to be the largest religious procession in the world, and to explore the islands named in the deity’s honor. Blessed with magical powers, Matsu, Taiwan’s superstar deity teaches creating balance in our lives and the lesson is illustrated in the 9-day Matsu Pilgrimage, which melds an exuberant worldly celebration with a mindful spiritual journey. It is literally an explosive event that encompasses the many sides of the Taiwanese nature. Complementing the festival is Joseph’s visit to the Matsu Islands, 100 miles from Taiwan while only 6 from China, revealing the resolute and determined survival instincts of the Taiwanese. Since the first Fujian fishermen came to the Matsu Islands in the 14th century, the archipelago has been a refuge. On his travels, Joseph discovers that for centuries, the islanders have weathered natural and political storms through their connections with each other and the sea. Today after decades of living in the shadow of war, they are ready to celebrate their historic, cultural and natural treasures.

 

 

PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS
Canefield Songs: Holehole Bushi

 

In this new film, Professor of Anthropology Christine Yano explains, “If we want to know something of what some of these womenʻs lives were like…we could do no better than to listen to their own words, as expressed through song.” The women that Professor Yano is referring to are Japanese immigrants who worked in Hawai‘i’s sugarcane fields in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Through their canefield songs, or holehole bushi, these women sang about their joys and sorrows of trying to start life in a new world. Hosted and narrated by ukulele virtuoso Jake Shimabukuro, the film tells the story of music teacher Harry Urata, and his efforts to record, preserve and perpetuate these musical oral histories.

 

 

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW
St. Louis, MO, Part 1 of 3

 

Journey through the Gateway to the West for treasures such as a 1901 “Longest Bearded Man” banner, a 1602 Adam Islip-published book of Chaucer’s complete works, and a 15th-century Chinese Bodhisattva gilt bronze. One is valued at $100,000-$125,000!

 

 

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