Chinese

HIKI NŌ
Episode #904 – How to Better the Community

 

TOP STORY
Students from Pomaika‘i Elementary School in Kahului, Maui make their HIKI NŌ debut with a primer on “How to Better the Community.” Their tips include: pick up trash from your local park; provide folding chairs for bus stops without benches; volunteer at an assisted living facility, school, food bank, or animal shelter. Pomaika‘i is only the third elementary school to produce content for HIKI NŌ.

 

ALSO FEATURED
–Students from Maui High School talk with the mother of a young woman with a rare chromosome deletion. She reveals all of the work and coordination that goes into caring for her daughter.

 

–Students from Waiākea Intermediate School in the Hilo district of Hawai‘i Island feature OK Farms, a family-run farm which gave up a large portion of its land to build a soccer field for their community –free of charge.

 

–Students from H.P. Baldwin High School in Wailuku, Maui show us how the band teacher at neighboring ‘Īao Intermediate School took a music program that was in a shambles and built it into a source of great pride for the school.

 

–Students from ‘Īao Intermediate School on Maui demonstrate how to make a beautiful Chinese lantern out of paper.

 

–Students from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kaua‘i show how one of their peers used video to help an elementary school class understand and accept their special needs classmate.

 

This program encores Saturday, Aug. 25, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Aug. 26, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 


JOSEPH ROSENDO’S TRAVELSCOPE
Taiwan: Matsu Festival and Islands

 

Joseph returns to Taiwan to follow in the path of Taiwan’s Matsu Pilgrimage, said to be the largest religious procession in the world, and to explore the islands named in the deity’s honor. Blessed with magical powers, Matsu, Taiwan’s superstar deity teaches creating balance in our lives and the lesson is illustrated in the 9-day Matsu Pilgrimage, which melds an exuberant worldly celebration with a mindful spiritual journey. It is literally an explosive event that encompasses the many sides of the Taiwanese nature. Complementing the festival is Joseph’s visit to the Matsu Islands, 100 miles from Taiwan while only 6 from China, revealing the resolute and determined survival instincts of the Taiwanese. Since the first Fujian fishermen came to the Matsu Islands in the 14th century, the archipelago has been a refuge. On his travels, Joseph discovers that for centuries, the islanders have weathered natural and political storms through their connections with each other and the sea. Today after decades of living in the shadow of war, they are ready to celebrate their historic, cultural and natural treasures.

 

 

GLOBE TREKKER
Food Hour: Southern China

GLOBE TREKKER - Food Hour: Southern China

 

Celebrated New Zealand chef Peter Gordon discovers the roots of Cantonese cuisine. Peter’s journey takes him north to Lianzhou, the mountain home of the Yao tribe, where he cooks succulent spiced pork. Next he walks the rice fields of the Pearl River Delta, and meets traditional medical doctors in Foshan. He also cooks up a strength-giving feast for dragon boat racing crews in Guangzhou, shops in the fabled market of Qingping and samples street fare in Chaozhou.

 

 

SAMANTHA BROWN’S PLACES TO LOVE
Xi’an, China

 

It’s been a decade since I last visited Xi’an, China, and it felt so good to be back. Founded in the 11th Century BC, every ancient building, bridge and tradition boggles the mind. I started out with leisurely bike ride atop the ancient City Wall, stopped at a traditional Chinese medicine clinic (practicing for over 500 years) to cure my jet-lag, and paid a visit to the UNESCO World Heritage site of the Terra-cotta Warriors. Add in a spectacular outdoor performance of The Song of the Everlasting Sorrow and incredible street food, and you’ll see why Xi’an is a place to love.

 

 

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW
St. Louis, MO, Part 1 of 3

 

Journey through the Gateway to the West for treasures such as a 1901 “Longest Bearded Man” banner, a 1602 Adam Islip-published book of Chaucer’s complete works, and a 15th-century Chinese Bodhisattva gilt bronze. One is valued at $100,000-$125,000!

 

 

INDEPENDENT LENS
I Am Another You

 

Join Chinese filmmaker Nanfu Wang and Dylan, a young homeless drifter who left a comfortable home and loving family, in this cross-cultural road trip that explores the limits and meaning of freedom.

 

 

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