citizen

WASHINGTON WEEK

WASHINGTON WEEK

 

For 40 years, WASHINGTON WEEK has delivered one of the most interesting conversations of the week. It is the longest-running public affairs program on PBS and features a group of journalists participating in roundtable discussions of major news events.

 

 

AMANPOUR ON PBS

Amanpour on PBS

 

Featuring conversations with global leaders and decision makers on the issues affecting the world today, Amanpour on PBS adds to the long tradition of public affairs programming that has been a hallmark of public media for decades.

 

 

POV
Do Not Resist

 

A vital and influential exploration of the rapid militarization of the police in the United States. Do Not Resist puts viewers in the center of the action — from inside a police training seminar that teaches the importance of “righteous violence” to the floor of a congressional hearing on the proliferation of military equipment in small-town police departments.

 

 

WASHINGTON WEEK SPECIAL EDITION

WASHINGTON WEEK SPECIAL EDITION

 

For 40 years, WASHINGTON WEEK has delivered one of the most interesting conversations of the week. It is the longest-running public affairs program on PBS and features a group of journalists participating in roundtable discussions of major news events.

 

 

The Draft

 

The draft in the 1960s and 1970s was a lightning rod that lit up schisms of race, class and culture in American society. But ending the draft has produced unintended consequences, creating a citizenry disconnected from that of the soldiers who experience the burden of war. The question of who serves in America’s military has shaped battle strategy and foreign policy and stranded Americans in uniform for years on distant battlefields. From the Civil War to the conflicts of the Vietnam era, forced military service has torn the nation apart – and sometimes, as in WWII, united Americans in a common purpose. Featuring interviews with the people who fought the draft, supported it and lived its realities, this program tells the story of how a single, controversial issue continues to define a nation.

 

Nothing Left to Lose

 

Nothing Left to Lose is a documentary which tells the story of approximately 100 Vietnamese refugees who have each lived in hiding for 25 years hoping to one day reclaim the dignity of being recognized as a person.

 

While the Vietnam War slowly fades away in our collective memory, there remains a group of Vietnamese in Thailand who are still searching for a new place to call home. These refugees escaped Vietnam after the end of the war, but were rejected by all countries in which they sought asylum. When all refugee camps in Southeast Asia were closed, the stateless refugees chose to stay in Thailand illegally, holding onto the hope of finding a new home. Over the last 25 years, the stateless Vietnamese have lingered in the shadows of Thai society dodging authorities with one hope in mind: to find a country that would accept them as its citizens.

 

AMERICAN EXPERIENCE
Walt Disney, Part 2

 

Walt Disney was uniquely adept at art as well as commerce, a master filmmaker who harnessed the power of technology and storytelling. This two-part film examines Disney’s complex life and enduring legacy, featuring rare archival footage from the Disney vaults, scenes from some of his greatest films, and interviews with biographers, animators and artists who worked on early films, including Snow White, and the designers who helped turn his dream of Disneyland into reality.

 

AMERICAN EXPERIENCE
Walt Disney, Part 1 of 2

 

Walt Disney was uniquely adept at art as well as commerce, a master filmmaker who harnessed the power of technology and storytelling. This two-part film examines Disney’s complex life and enduring legacy, featuring rare archival footage from the Disney vaults, scenes from some of his greatest films, and interviews with biographers, animators and artists who worked on early films, including Snow White, and the designers who helped turn his dream of Disneyland into reality.

 

POV
Tribal Justice

 

Follow two Native American judges who reach back to traditional concepts of justice in order to reduce incarceration rates, foster greater safety for their communities, and create a more positive future for their youth.

 

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