citizenship

ASIAN AMERICANS

 

This five-part series, presented over two evenings, chronicles the contributions and challenges of Asian Americans to our country’s past, present and future, told through individual lives and personal histories.

 

ASIAN AMERICANS - Episode 1: Breaking Ground

Episode 1: Breaking Ground
Monday, May 11, 8:00-9:00 pm

Immigrants arrive from China, India, Japan, the Philippines and beyond. Barred by anti-Asian laws, they become America’s first “undocumented immigrants.” They take their fight for equality to the U.S. Supreme Court.

ASIAN AMERICANS - Episode 2: a Question of Loyalty

Episode 2: A Question of Loyalty
Monday, May 11, 9:00-10:00 pm

An American-born generation’s loyalties are tested during World War II, when families are imprisoned in detention camps, and brothers find themselves on opposite sides of the battle lines.

ASIAN AMERICANS: Patsy Mink

Episode 3: Good Americans
Tuesday, May 12, 8:00-9:00 pm

During the Cold War years, Asian Americans are simultaneously heralded as a model minority and targeted as the perpetual foreigner. But during this time, they aspire for the first time to national political office.

ASIAN AMERICANS: Bruce Lee, Martial Artist and Actor

Episode 4: Generation Rising
Tuesday, May 12, 9:00-10:00 pm

During the time of the Vietnam War and social tumult, a young generation fights for equality in the fields, on campuses and in the culture, and claim a new identity: Asian Americans.

ASIAN AMERICANS - Episode 4: Generation Rising

Episode 5: Breaking Through
Tuesday, May 12, 10:00-11:00 pm

At the turn of the millennium, a new generation of Asian Americans are empowered by growing numbers and rising influence but face a reckoning of what it means to be an American.

 

 

 

 

ASIAN AMERICANS
Breaking Ground / A Question of Loyalty

 

ASIAN AMERICANS: Breaking Ground

Episode 1: Breaking Ground
Monday, May 11, 8:00-9:00 pm

Immigrants arrive from China, India, Japan, the Philippines and beyond. Barred by anti-Asian laws, they become America’s first “undocumented immigrants.” They take their fight for equality to the U.S. Supreme Court.

 

ASIAN AMERICANS: A Question of Loyalty

Episode 2: A Question of Loyalty
Monday, May 11, 9:00-10:00 pm

An American-born generation’s loyalties are tested during World War II, when families are imprisoned in detention camps, and brothers find themselves on opposite sides of the battle lines.

 

To see complete descriptions of all programs in this series, click here.

 

 

ASIAN AMERICANS
Good Americans / Generation Rising

 

ASIAN AMERICANS: Good Americans

Episode 3: Good Americans
Tuesday, May 12, 8:00-9:00 pm

During the Cold War years, Asian Americans are simultaneously heralded as a model minority and targeted as the perpetual foreigner. But during this time, they aspire for the first time to national political office.

 

ASIAN AMERICAN: Generation Rising - Bruce Lee, Martial Artist and Actor

Episode 4: Generation Rising
Tuesday, May 12, 9:00-10:00 pm

During the time of the Vietnam War and social tumult, a young generation fights for equality in the fields, on campuses and in the culture, and claim a new identity: Asian Americans

 

To see complete descriptions of all programs in this series, click here.

 

 

ASIAN AMERICANS
Breaking Through

ASIAN AMERICANS: Breaking Through

 

At the turn of the millennium, a new generation of Asian Americans are empowered by growing numbers and rising influence but face a reckoning of what it means to be an American.

 

To see complete descriptions of all programs in this series, click here.

 

 

FRONTLINE
Marcos Doesn’t Live Here Anymore

FRONTLINE: Marcos Doesn’t Live Here Anymore

 

Marcos Doesn’t Live Here Anymore examines the US immigration system through the eyes of two unforgettable protagonists whose lives reveal the human cost of deportation.

 

Preview

 

 

 

Fact-Based Reporting, Without Fear or Favor

 

CEO Message

Fact-Based Reporting, Without Fear or Favor

 

Leslie Wilcox, PBS Hawai‘i President and CEOI first took note of war correspondent Christiane Amanpour back in the early 1990s when I saw her on cable channel CNN, running across a crowded street in Bosnia with sniper fire ringing out.

 

It wasn’t only her risk-taking that arrested me; it was her unflinching reports on a different kind of war. This wasn’t an army versus an army. It was a war against civilians.

 

More than two decades later, she would say: “I learned…when I was covering genocide and ethnic cleansing in Bosnia, never to equate victim and aggressor, never to create a false moral or factual equivalence.”

 

“When lies become mixed up with the truth, it’s a very dangerous world.” – Christiane Amanpour“Because then, if you do, particularly in situations like that,” she said, “you are party and accomplice to the most unspeakable crimes and consequences.”

 

“So,” she concluded, “I believe in being truthful, not neutral.”

 

Amanpour, who is now CNN’s Chief International Correspondent, interviews global leaders and decision-makers on PBS every weeknight at 11:00. Her program, Amanpour on PBS, joined the programming line-up after PBS stopped distributing programs with Charlie Rose, following multiple women’s allegations of sexual harassment.

 

Amanpour, who turns 59 this month, is a British citizen who spent her early years in Tehran. She is the product of a Muslim father from Iran and a Christian mother from England – and she’s married to a Jewish American, former U.S. diplomat Jamie Rubin. They live in London with their teenage son, Darius.

 

“I’ve lived in a completely multi-cultural, multi-ethnic, multi-religious environment, in some of the most difficult places in the world,” Amanpour has said.

 

“I’ve seen firsthand that you can bridge differences, you can have tolerance between groups. The trick is to minimize the extremes, whether it’s in politics or in religion or in any kind of relationship, and to stick to the sensible center, which is where the vast majority, not only of this country but the world, lies,” she says.

 

Amanpour also has a knack for bridging between television networks and countries. She will remain with CNN in Britain while sharing her interviews with PBS in America.

 

She urges all journalists to re-commit to robust, fact-based reporting on the issues – without fear and without favor.

 

“When lies become mixed up with the truth,” she said, “it’s a very dangerous world.”

 

Almost three decades after Christiane dodged bullets in the Balkans, she’s sitting down in the studio with world power players. I still find her coverage arresting. And the truth is worth staying up for. See you at 11:00 weeknights, “Amanpour on PBS.”

 

Aloha nui,

 

Leslie signature

ROADTRIP NATION
Beyond the Dream

 

This edition follows three 20-something immigrants who were each brought to the U.S. at a young age by their parents. They all have temporary relief from deportation, but not legal status. An immigration policy called DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) has allowed them to live and work in the U.S. for a two-year period. But without long-term protections, they have a much graver question to ponder: “Will I be able to stay in this country?”

 

Stateless

 

Emmy Award-winning filmmaker Duc H. Nguyen follows the stories of Vietnamese refugees who have been living in a condition of statelessness in the Philippines for 16 years while awaiting a rare opportunity for resettlement in the United States.

 

Taking Our Cue from the Kukui Tree

 

Architect Sheryl Seaman created these kukui designs for our NEW HOME. The designs are featured on PBS Hawaii's new t-shirt.

Architect Sheryl Seaman created these kukui designs for our NEW HOME. The designs are featured on PBS Hawai‘i’s new t-shirt

 

Leslie Wilcox, President and CEO of PBS HawaiiIf you pluck just one nut from a kukui tree, you will have oil to illuminate the dark for more than three minutes. That’s one of many reasons that Polynesian voyagers brought kukui saplings aboard their canoes to this new land more than 1,500 years ago. Almost every part of the kukui tree was useful in the settlers’ everyday lives. Today the kukui tree is our state tree.

 

Our PBS Hawai‘i team looks forward to seeing the kukui represented on our soon-to-be NEW HOME on Nimitz Highway. Group 70 International architect Sheryl Seaman has designed an artful metal screen to enfold the building, depicting historically important Hawaiian plants of the area.

 

The kukui is a particular favorite of ours because it does what we try to do in our own way – be useful every day and illuminate.

 

At last month’s meeting of PBS Hawai‘i’s statewide Community Advisory Board, Maui member Kainoa Horcajo called out a recent illuminating Insights on PBS Hawai‘i program. Three individuals who’ve been diagnosed with stage-four (advanced) cancer spoke candidly on live television about what they think about and what their lives are like as they face the prospect of death.

 

“What is more shrouded in darkness and needs more illumination than death?” Horcajo asked. “(Hawaiian) sovereignty and death – those are the elephants in the room in Hawai‘i.”

 

Lei Kihoi Dunne of Hawai‘i Island spoke of activists in her rural county. A Kona attorney, Dunne said, “They need to know how to access and participate and properly conduct themselves in advocacy that truly advances their cause.”

 

“Right now, people feel outside the process,” Dunne said. “They can be empowered to make a difference and bring, for example, a contested-case hearing to protect natural resources and culture.”

 

Horcajo agreed that knowledge of procedure counts: “Knocking on the wrong doors engenders apathy – a feeling that nothing will change…You don’t go to a shave ice store to buy a loco moco.”

 

Oahu member Cheryl Ka‘uhane Lupenui said that civics education is important for good citizenship: “It’s wayfinding.”

 

Long ago, Polynesian voyagers brought the means to create light. The kukui tree design on our new building will be a constant reminder to shed light on things that matter.

 

Aloha a hui hou,

Leslie signature

 

INDEPENDENT LENS
East of Salinas

 

This film is a story about immigration, childhood and circumstance. With little support at home, Salinas, California third grader Jose Ansaldo often turns to his teacher, Oscar Ramos, once a migrant farm kid himself. Oscar helps Jose imagine a future beyond the lettuce fields where his parents work. But Jose was born in Mexico – and he’s on the cusp of understanding the implications of that.

 

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