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INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI
Road Usage Charge

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI: Road Usage Charge

 

The State uses money from its 16-cents-per-gallon gas tax to maintain and fix roads. But the development of more fuel-efficient cars, and electric and hybrid cars, means less money. Now the State wants feedback on a proposal to eliminate the tax and instead levy a per-mile road usage charge, which it says will cost motorists about the same amount. Join the discussion on the Road Usage Charge on INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI. You can phone in, or leave us a comment on Facebook or Twitter.

 

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

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SAMANTHA BROWN’S PLACES TO LOVE
Christchurch, New Zealand

SAMANTHA BROWN’S PLACES TO LOVE: Christchurch, New Zealand

 

Those willing to make the long journey to New Zealand will be handsomely rewarded. From the legendary landscapes to its famous wines, and even more famous hospitality, this island in the middle of the South Pacific offers something for everyone. Even though Christchurch is the oldest established city in New Zealand, there’s a newness to this city, and a momentum unlike any other. Here’s why Christchurch, New Zealand is a place to love.

 

Preview

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Pedestrian Perils and other stories

HIKI NŌ: Episode #1004 - Pedestrian Perils and other stories

 

TOP STORY

 

Students from Āliamanu Middle School in the Salt Lake district of Oʻahu re-visit an issue they reported on for HIKI NŌ over six years ago: the pedestrian hazards around their campus and the campus of Āliamanu Elementary School. Most of Salt Lake Boulevard is a four-lane City & County road. But for a one-mile stretch, beginning at the two Āliamanu campuses, the road narrows to two lanes, increasing traffic congestion right in front of the schools. Adding to the problem is the fact that there is a popular shopping center across from the schools, which acts as a lure for students to cross the busy boulevard. In April of 2012, when Āliamanu Middle School’s first report on this subject aired, plans were in place to widen the stretch of Salt Lake Boulevard adjacent to the schools as part of the rail project. Since then, the rail route has shifted from Salt Lake to the airport, and the Salt Lake Boulevard widening project has fallen to the wayside. The original 2012 story will also be aired to provide context for the current story and to show how little has been done about the problem in the ensuing six years.

 

Program

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

–Students from Kalani High School in east Oʻahu show us how to get something we all need: a better night’s sleep.

 

–Students from Hawaiʻi Preparatory Academy in the Waimea district of Hawaiʻi Island give us the ins and outs of their keiki triathlon.

 

–Students from Sacred Hearts Academy on Oʻahu explore how their generation feels about ecology and the environment.

 

–Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School in Upcountry Maui tell the story of an Alabama transplant who marches to the beat of a different drum.

 

–Students from Waiʻanae High School in West Oʻahu take us to the last remaining dairy farm on Oʻahu.

 

–Students from ʻEwa Makai Middle School on Oʻahu profile a young woman who uses dance to hold her life together.

 

 

RUDY MAXA’S WORLD
Four Great Cities of Asia

RUDY MAXA’S WORLD: Four Great Cities of Asia

 

Only three per cent of the world’s population lived in cities in 1800s, but that number will swell to 70% by 2050. Cities in Asia underwent rapid growth in the past century, and “Four Great Cities of Asia” examines the remarkable evolution of the mega-city. From the world’s largest city, Tokyo, to the colorful chaos of Delhi, and from the modern miracle of Seoul to the teeming streets of Bangkok, “Four Great Cities of Asia” is a passport to the high-tech marvels and back-street secrets of four of the world’s most amazing cities.

 

 

 

CURIOUS TRAVELER
Curious Quebec City

 

After nearly 500 years, French is still the official language of this North American city. How has this UNESCO World Heritage Site retained its ‘Frenchness’ after all this time? Why does the Chateau Frontenac hotel look like a French castle, and what does it have to do with the Canadian railway? What’s so curious about Rue Saint-Jean, Place Royal and Petit-Champlain?

 

 

 

 

RUDY MAXA’S WORLD
Bangkok

 

Bangkok is a city of the senses – a bejeweled, dazzling, fantastical mix of magic and faith, hard work and love of life, grace and wild abandon. It’s a city where chaos and serenity happily co-exist. Host Rudy Maxa and Washington, D.C. restauranteur and chef Daisuke Utagawa roll up their sleeves and prepare to eat their way across this city. Bangkok is one enormous dining room. Nobody eats at home; everything in this tropical town happens on the street. These fun loving, food crazy, spiritually rich, profoundly graceful people make Bangkok one of the most welcoming cities in the world.

 

 

 

RUDY MAXA’S WORLD
Hong Kong, Part 1 of 2

RUDY MAXA’S WORLD: Hong Kong, Part 1

 

A bastion of capitalism under the umbrella of China, a city with a stunning array of architecturally interesting skyscrapers, and a city where shopping and dining are varsity sports, Hong Kong certainly ranks as one of the world’s great cities. Host Rudy Maxa and Washington, D.C. restaurateur and chef Daisuke Utagawa enthusiastically eat their way through Hong Kong, from cheap but authentic, hole-in-the-wall Chinese restaurants to Michelin-starred palaces. Along the way they illustrate the excitement, stunning topography, and energy that defines Hong Kong.

 

Hong Kong, Part 1 of 2
From hole-in-the-wall Chinese restaurants, to Michelin-starred palaces, Rudy and chef Daisuke Utagawa eat their way through the amazing foods & flavors of Hong Kong.

 

 

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
2019 Legislative Wrap-up

 

State lawmakers went into this year’s legislative session with bills regarding prison reform, loosening marijuana laws, raising the minimum wage, plastic waste, disaster relief, more money for schools and resolving water rights issues across the state. What were the successes and failures? And what else should have been talked about?

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

 

 


PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS
The Hawaiian Room

PBS Hawai‘i Presents: The Hawaiian Room

 

The Hawaiian Room, located in the famed Lexington Hotel, was an oasis of Hawaiian culture and entertainment in the heart of New York City. Between 1937 and 1966, hundreds of dancers, singers and musicians from Hawai‘i were recruited to perform at the entertainment venue. In this documentary, filmmaker Ann Marie Kirk shares interviews with over 20 former performers who speak candidly and fondly of their experience at the historic nightclub, and the culture shock of going from Hawai‘i to New York City.

 

Preview

 

 

 

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