Civil War

GREAT PERFORMANCES
The Hollow Crown: The Wars of the Roses – Henry VI, Part I

 

The Hollow Crown: The Wars of the Roses is an epic saga told in three lavish film adaptations of Shakespeare’s history plays: Parts I and II of Henry VI and Richard III. Together, they span rebellion in France, the rise and fall of Joan of Arc, the terror of England’s Civil War and the deceitful dynastic murders culminating in the infamous reign of Richard III.

 

Henry VI, Part I
England is in crisis. War rages and divisions within the English court threaten the crown. Young Henry VI causes outrage by marrying Margaret of Anjou; the scene is set for civil war. Tom Sturridge, Sophie Okonedo and Hugh Bonneville star.

 

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW
Vintage Miami

 

Look back to 2001 to learn what has since happened since the Roadshow visited Miami. Highlights include a John Lehman stoneware jug from around 1870, a 34-Star Civil War flag and a Rene Portocarrero painting, ca. 1958. Which item’s valuation soared to $125,000?

 

JAZZ
The Adventure (1955-1960)

JAZZ: The Adventure (1955-1960)

 

As rhythm and blues and rock ‘n’ roll erode jazz’s audience, the music nonetheless enjoys a time of tremendous creativity. Tenor saxophonist John Coltrane scores a hit with his version of the show tune “My Favorite Things” and creates some of the most intense music in jazz history.

 

JAZZ
A Masterpiece by Midnight (1961-Present)

JAZZ: A Masterpiece by Midnight. Charles Mingus in 1976

 

In the 1960s, the question of what is jazz and what isn’t rages, dividing audiences, musicians and generations. Miles Davis leads a movement of jazz musicians who incorporate elements of rock and soul into their music.

 

JAZZ
Risk (1945 – 1955)

 

Jazz splinters into different camps: white and black, cool and hot, East and West, traditional and modern. Trumpeter Miles Davis becomes the most influential musician of his generation.

 

JAZZ
Dedicated to Chaos (1940 – 1945)

 

The infectious music of the swing bands sets the mood for soldiers going off to fight in World War II. Trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie and alto saxophonist Charlie Parker take jazz in startling new directions with their complex music called bebop.

 

JAZZ
Swing: The Velocity of Celebration (1937-1939)

JAZZ: Swing: The Velocity of Celebration

 

Acclaimed filmmaker Ken Burns tells the story of jazz – the quintessential American art form. The 10-part series follows the growth and development of jazz music from its beginnings to the present.

 

Swing: The Velocity of Celebration (1937-1939)
As the Great Depression deepens, jazz thrives. The saxophone emerges as an iconic instrument of the music and women musicians emerge on the jazz scene. Benny Goodman holds the first-ever jazz concert at Carnegie Hall.

 

JAZZ
Swing: Pure Pleasure (1935-1937)

 

Acclaimed filmmaker Ken Burns tells the story of jazz – the quintessential American art form. The 10-part series follows the growth and development of jazz music from its beginnings to the present.

 

Swing: Pure Pleasure (1935-1937)
Big band jazz – swing – becomes the most popular music in America. Some fans, disturbed by its popularity, start a movement to embrace “traditional” jazz. In the western “territories,” a blues-soaked big band style further transforms jazz.

 

JAZZ
Our Language (1924-1928)

 

Acclaimed filmmaker Ken Burns tells the story of jazz – the quintessential American art form. The 10-part series follows the growth and development of jazz music from its beginnings to the present.

 

Our Language (1924-1928)
Follow musicians Louis Armstrong, Bessie Smith, Bix Beiderbecke, Benny Goodman, Artie Shaw, Sidney Bechet, Ethel Waters and Duke Ellington, who begins his incomparable career as the pre-eminent composer in jazz history.

 

JAZZ
The True Welcome (1929-1935)

JAZZ: The True Welcome (1929-1935)

 

Acclaimed filmmaker Ken Burns tells the story of jazz – the quintessential American art form. The 10-part series follows the growth and development of jazz music from its beginnings to the present.

 

The True Welcome (1929-1935)
Amid the Depression, the Lindy Hop begins to catch on at dance halls. The reminiscences of two of Harlem’s great dancers, Frankie Manning and Norma Miller, inform the episode. As swing dancing catches on, a new kind of big band jazz begins to emerge.

 

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