collaboration

What’s it Going to Take?
An executive forum on making life better in Hawaiʻi

What's it Going to Take? - An executive forum on making life better in Hawaiʻi

What's it Going to Take statistics: • Almost half of Hawaiʻi residents are barely making ends meet. • 6 out of 10 jobs pay less than a living wage. • 3 out of 4 people earning low wages still need housing. Source: Hawaiʻi Community Foundation

 

LIVE Thursday, October 24, 8:00-10:00 pm

 

Something different is happening.

 

Top senior Hawaiʻi executives are joining forces to help solve longstanding
community issues that are holding Hawaiʻi back.

Scheduled to appear:

 

• Duane Kurisu, aio Founder, Hawaiʻi Executive Conference Chairman
• Catherine Ngo, President and CEO, Central Pacific Bank
• Bob Harrison, Chairman and CEO, First Hawaiian Bank
• Rich Wacker, President and CEO, American Savings Bank
• Micah Kāne, CEO and President, Hawaiʻi Community Foundation
• Colbert Matsumoto, Chairman, Tradewind Capital Group
• Jack Wong, CEO, Kamehameha Schools
• Elliot Mills, Vice President and General Manager, Aulani, Disney Resort and Spa
• Robert Nobriga, President, Island Holdings
• Kamanaʻo Crabbe, Former CEO, Office of Hawaiian Affairs
• Ann Botticelli, Senior Vice President Communications and Public Affairs, Hawaiian Airlines

 

These executives are using detailed data* commissioned by the
Hawaiʻi Community Foundation and combining their problem-solving
experiences and influence to engage other sectors in a collaborative
resolve to make life in Hawaiʻi better.

 

Click the link to learn more about the Change Framework: https://www.hawaiicommunityfoundation.org/join-the-movement

 

Join host Leslie Wilcox for an unprecedented public conversation with top Hawaiʻi executives who are armed with detailed information and influence to marshal answers to deep-seated community problems.

 

 


 

Scheduled to appear at this live event:

 

Duane Kurisu
aio Founder
Hawai‘i Executive Conference
  Chairman

Catherine Ngo
President and CEO
Central Pacific Bank

Bob Harrison
Chairman and CEO
First Hawaiian Bank


Rich Wacker
President and CEO
American Savings Bank

Micah Kāne
CEO and President
Hawai‘i Community Foundation

Colbert Matsumoto
Chairman
Tradewind Capital Group

Jack Wong
CEO
Kamehameha Schools

Elliott Mills
Vice President and
  General Manager
Aulani, Disney Resort and Spa

Robert Nobriga
President
Island Holdings

Kamana‘o Crabbe
Former CEO,
  Office of Hawaiian Affairs

Ann Botticelli
Senior Vice President
  Communications and Public Affairs
Hawaiian Airlines

 


 

 

 

The Filmmaker Who Went Behind Prison Walls

 

CEO Message

 

The Filmmaker Who Went Behind Prison Walls

Leslie Wilcox, PBS Hawai‘i President and CEOBy definition, film directors have control issues. To fulfill their creative vision, they compel events and people and settings to conform to plan.

 

“I’m so bossy, I’m so bossy,” says award-winning O‘ahu film director Ciara Lacy, whose cinéma vérité documentary Out of State was selected for national distribution by the PBS series Independent Lens.

 

We at PBS Hawai‘i are proud to debut Out of State this month. The documentary follows two Native Hawaiian men who were sent to serve their prison sentences at privately owned Saguaro Correctional Center in Arizona. They’re connecting with their culture behind bars, far from home, and later they struggle to reintegrate into society on O‘ahu.

 

Controlling her circumstances had long been a hallmark of Ciara’s life. As a teenager, her relentless control of time and study habits helped propel her to honors as valedictorian at Kamehameha Schools Kapālama. Next came graduation from Yale University.

 

Instead of pursuing a job related to her psychology major, Ciara resolved to break into the music video business in New York. And she did so – by placing a Craigslist ad.

 

Hawaiʻi filmmaker Ciara LacyHer ability to harness people and schedules and her creativity led to 10 years of consuming work in video production on the East and West Coasts.

 

“You want to show up and own the space and say, ‘This is how everything has to work.’ Right? This is my crew, this is my schedule, this is what it has to be,” Ciara explained on a recent episode of Long Story Short.

 

However, tell that to prison authorities who rule the roost and to prisoners who have more than enough reasons not to let down their guard. Ciara knew she wouldn’t be able to make the film she wanted, unless she released her need for control.

 

“When it came to working in the prison,” she said, “I call it Taoist filmmaking. You don’t have control and you just give it all up. And you say, ‘thank you for whatever you’re able to do.’”

 

All of five-feet-three inches tall and swimming in her husband’s long-sleeved shirt, Ciara says she employed a different “super power” in interacting with prison officials and prisoners.

 

“I brought a female presence into an all-male space and used collaboration. It wasn’t about me and what I get, it was about sharing.”

 

The result is a thought-provoking, multi-layered film, airing on May 6 at 9:00 pm on PBS Hawai‘i.

 

Congratulations to Ciara Lacy, her producer Beau Bassett of Honolulu and the documentary team. And best wishes to prisoners and ex-cons with their own kind of creative vision: seeing and striving to make better lives.

 

Aloha Nui,

Leslie signature


 

 

 

FRONTLINE
Right to Fail

FRONTLINE: Right to Fail

 

After decades in institutions, a man with schizophrenia faces violence and death to live on his own. In collaboration with ProPublica, the film investigates a court-ordered effort to move those with serious mental illness into independent living.

 

Preview

 

 

 

The Evolution of HIKI NŌ

 

COVER STORY: The Evolution of HIKI NŌ by Robert Pennybacker - Director, Learning Initiatives, PBS Hawaiʻi

 

Students from O‘ahu’s Ka‘ala Elementary School in Wahiawā

Students from O‘ahu’s Ka‘ala Elementary School

 

Launching a New Season
Thursday, February 7, 7:30 pm

 

When HIKI NŌ premiered on February 28, 2011, the HIKI NŌ students from Ka‘ala Elementary School who grace the cover of this program guide were toddlers. The Maui Waena Intermediate School students who hosted that first episode are now seniors in college. If the students have matured over the eight years HIKI NŌ has been on the air, so has the program.

 

Eight years ago, a weekly half-hour show in which middle and high school students write, report, shoot and edit PBS-quality news features on topics that they selected was inconceivable. Before going on the air, the premise of HIKI NŌ (which means “Can Do” in the Hawaiian language) was based on the supposition that the same professional quality found in news stories already being created at Wai‘anae High School’s Searider media program could be duplicated in other schools across the islands. Nobody knew if this grand experiment would work.

 

Not only did it work – it flourished beyond expectations and spread to 90 public, charter, and private schools throughout state – including four elementary schools!

 

Clockwise from top left: Students from Maui’s Seabury Hall School, A student from O‘ahu’s Aliamanu Middle School with Pearl Harbor attack witness Jimmy Lee at the World War II Valor in the Pacific National Monument, Students from Maui's Lahaina Intermediate School, Students from Kauaʻi's Kapaʻa Middle School

Clockwise from top left: Students from Maui’s Seabury Hall School, A student from O‘ahu’s  Aliamanu Middle School with Pearl Harbor attack witness Jimmy Lee at the World War II Valor in the Pacific National Monument, Students from Maui’s Lahaina Intermediate School, Students from Kauaʻi’s Kapaʻa Middle School

 

HIKI NŌ has thrived because of its unique intersection of two distinct worlds: The education world and the real-life world of a public television station that must uphold the standards of its broadcast and online content.

 

The rigorous experience of refining their stories to meet PBS national standards has helped HIKI NŌ students to dominate national digital media competitions. At the Student Television Network’s 2018 Fall Challenge, Hawai‘i’s HIKI NŌ schools garnered 33% of the awards given out for that competition. Hawai‘i took home the most awards of any state (13), followed by California (10) and Florida (5).

 

After the launch of the program, teachers and others from the education world began to notice that the HIKI NŌ experience taught students much more than how to tell stories with pictures and sound. It helped them to develop the basic skills needed to survive in the new, global economy: critical thinking, creative problem solving, adaptability, collaboration, teamwork and entrepreneurialism. The recognition that these skills are essential to students’ success in college and beyond has led to dynamic partnerships between HIKI NŌ/PBS Hawai‘i and the state’s Early College and P-20 programs.

 

A core group of HIKI NŌ teachers informally known as Hawai‘i Creative Media proved to be the most effective trainers of other HIKI NŌ teachers and their students. Their importance to the process became so evident that they organized themselves as a nonprofit organization – the Hawai‘i Creative Media Foundation – whose mission is to provide students and teachers across the state with training in basic digital media skills.

 

The state’s CTE (Career Technology Education) program and the Department of Education have recognized the importance of this training and are making plans to fund the Hawai‘i Creative Media-led teacher/student workshops. Up until now these workshops have been paid for by PBS Hawai‘i. This shift toward the educational institutions funding the training of its teachers and students represents a sea change for HIKI NŌ. It acknowledges that the educators are equal partners in the HIKI NŌ process and brings into focus the distinct roles that the two worlds must play: Hawai‘i’s educators teach Hawai‘i’s students, while PBS Hawai‘i provides them with the real-world, professional experience, plus statewide (broadcast) and worldwide (online) platforms for their voices to be heard.

 

 

 

FRONTLINE
Rape on the Night Shift

 

Following up on the award-winning collaboration that produced “Rape in the Fields/Violación de un Sueño” in 2013, FRONTLINE (PBS), Univision, Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting (CIR), the Investigative Reporting Program (IRP) at UC Berkeley, and KQED are teaming up to uncover the sexual abuse of immigrant women who clean the malls where you shop, the banks where you do business, and the offices where you work.

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
Balancing the Endangered and Invasive Among Us

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I gave several environmental agencies a difficult assignment: collaborate, prioritize and come up with a list of the top five indigenous species we must save – and the top five invasive species we must eliminate. The nene (goose), ‘io (hawk) and honu (sea turtle) might be on one list. The coqui frog, miconia and fire ants could be found on the other. Find out the results in this live discussion. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Coordinating Group on Alien Pest Species and The Nature Conservancy were the groups who collaborated on the lists.

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 



NATURE
Jungle Animal Hospital

 

Witness the day-to-day drama at one of the world’s wildest hospitals, deep in the Guatemalan jungle. A vet and his team take on dangerous challenges as they care for endangered animals – from stitching up a rare baby bird to wrestling a crocodile.

 

LIVE FROM LINCOLN CENTER
Danny Elfman’s Music from the Films of Tim Burton

 

Composer and performer Danny Elfman descends on Lincoln Center with a symphony orchestra and choir, led by conductor John Mauceri, as well as a colorful assortment of Tim Burton fans. The evening includes performances of Elfman’s most beloved scores from films in collaboration with Tim Burton such as Batman, Beetlejuice, Edward Scissorhands and The Nightmare Before Christmas. Accompanying the music are film clips and original sketches and storyboards created by Tim Burton.

 

1 2