conference

KĀKOU – Hawai‘i’s Town Hall:
Have You Fact-Checked Your Truth?

KĀKOU – Hawai‘i’s Town Hall

With ever-increasing divisions in our country, PBS Hawai‘i introduces a new series of live town hall events called KĀKOU – Hawai‘i’s Town Hall. In this first live discussion, we ask: “Have You Fact-Checked Your Truth?” We take on the meaning of “truth” and how we view truth in an era of “fake news,” “trolling” and filter bubbles on social media. Is there one truth – or is truth in the eye of the beholder?

 

You can email us with your thoughts in advance at kakou@pbshawaii.org, or post on Twitter using the #pbskakou hashtag. The town-hall will also be live streamed on pbshawaii.org and on Facebook Live, where you can also join the conversation.

 

What is KĀKOU?

 

 

KĀKOU – Hawai‘i’s Town Hall
Have You Fact-Checked Your Truth?

Original broadcast date: Thursday, October 5, 2017

 

 

 

Where Everyone Knows Your Name

 

CEO Message

Where Everyone Knows Your Name
A Surprise for Our Board Chair


Where Everyone Knows Your Name: A Surprise for Our Board Chair

Left: PBS Hawai‘i outgoing Board Chair Robbie Alm and PBS Hawai‘i President and CEO Leslie Wilcox. Right: The newly named Robbie Alm Board Room

 

It’s not my practice to keep secrets from my outgoing Board Chair, Robbie Alm. I’m doing it this once, because it’s a one-of-a-kind secret that really should be a surprise.

 

By the time you read this, the cat will be out of the bag and Robbie will have retired from the Board following a long and successful tenure. Among his many achievements as leader: diversifying our revenues, investing in revolutionary tech advancements, founding the nation’s first statewide student news network, and building a new $30 million home on time and on budget.

 

Even before he was a Board member, Robbie was a champion of public broadcasting. He’s been involved in supporting this station, in one way or another, for more than 30 years.

 

So, of course, Board and Staff are having a party for him. We’ll give him lei and an engraved keepsake, and there’ll be a special song from former Board member, Hoku Award-winning performer/composer Kawika Kahiapo. Robbie also will have to endure a few speeches.

 

And – here’s our secret. PBS Hawai‘i’s handsome Board Room, which doubles as a second TV/video studio and has a view of our large studio below, will be named after him.

 

Robbie displayed both battle-hardened confidence and quiet humility in getting our new home built. He likes the results so much, that he’s known to stop by when he could simply make a phone call. He enjoys the natural light, the openness of the floor plan, the cheerful colors, the way the space accommodates work flow.

 

And now his name will be on the room where he presided over high-level governance decisions. We hope he continues to stop by and enjoy – without any worry.

 

In next month’s guide, I’ll write about PBS Hawai‘i’s incoming Board Chair. We’re proud to have our first ever Chair from a Neighbor Island: Jason Fujimoto of Hilo, an accomplished executive whose family-founded, employee-owned business is nearly a century old.

 

A hui hou – until next time,
Leslie signature

 

A CHEF’S LIFE
More Than One Way to Skin a Catfish

 

The fourth helping of this award-winning series is the most unpredictable yet, featuring a healthy dose of homegrown laughter and inspired ingredients served up by Chef Vivian Howard alongside a hearty cast of family, farmers, chefs, home cooks and friends.

 

More than One Way to Skin a Catfish
An up-close-and-personal experience with farm-raised catfish offers Vivian an enlightened perspective on the industry. When a staff member’s last day at the restaurant finally arrives, heavy emotions and fond memories create a bonding moment for the entire crew.

 

A CHEF’S LIFE
Rabbit

 

The fourth helping of this award-winning series is the most unpredictable yet, featuring a healthy dose of homegrown laughter and inspired ingredients served up by Chef Vivian Howard alongside a hearty cast of family, farmers, chefs, home cooks and friends.

 

Rabbit
Vivian attends the Carolina Meat Conference and demonstrates rabbit processing. As a cherished staff member prepares to leave the restaurant, Vivian mourns his loss while anticipating the additional strain.

 

HIKI NŌ
Outstanding Stories from Winter Quarter

 

This look back at some of the outstanding HIKI NŌ stories from the winter quarter of the 2014/2015 school year is hosted by two former HIKI NŌ interns, Akane Kashiwazaki and Terrence Nahina, now students at the University of Hawaii Academy for Creative Media.

 

Featured in this compilation show are:
A story from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui about McKayla Wandell, who grew up with a meth-addicted father and now uses what she has learned from that experience to help other teens cope with similar hardships through her talks at Maui TEDx conferences; a story from Wheeler Middle School on Oahu about eighth-grader Macy Walters’ quest to climb to the top of Mount Kilimanjaro, despite (and because of) the fact that she suffers from a rare autoimmune disease; a report from Moanalua High School on Oahu about why Hawaii’s high school students consume so much caffeine; a personal profile from King Intermediate School on Oahu about Aisha Yamamoto, a King Intermediate seventh-grader who loves using her skills as a DJ to get kids moving on the dance floor; a point-of-view report from Hoku Subiono of Kua o ka La PCS Milolii Hipuu Virtual Academy on Hawaii Island in which turns the lens on the controversial Thirty Meter Telescope project on Mauna Kea and his own struggles to reconcile his love of science with his Hawaiian heritage; a profile from Waianae Intermediate School on Oahu about Shardenei Luning, a young woman who finds similarities between her lives as a beauty pageant contestant and Pop Warner football player; and from Campbell High School on Oahu, the story of dancer Christian Jacob Nguyen, who uses his art-form to cope with the trauma of his parents’ divorce.

 

This program encores Saturday, Aug. 8 at 12:30 pm and Sunday, Aug. 9 at 3:00 pm.
You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Outstanding stories from Spring Quarter 2014/2015

 

This special edition of HIKI NŌ highlights is hosted by HIKI NŌ grad Victoria Cuba and features some of the outstanding stories from the Spring Quarter of the 2014/2015 school year:

 

From Waipahu High School on Oahu: a follow-up story on Victoria Cuba. We first met Victoria last season as a senior at Waipahu High School, when she opened up about being homeless. Now, she attends the University of Hawaii at Manoa on a full scholarship and interns at PBS Hawaii. No longer homeless, she resides in a UH dorm, but admits that the transition has had its challenges.

 

From Kapaa High School on Kauai: the story of a new program created by the Kauai Humane Society to encourage the adoption of dogs. Volunteers take dogs from the Kauai Humane Society on field trips to various places on the island to help them meet potential owners.

 

From Ewa Makai Middle School on Oahu: an introduction to P.E. for the 21st century. When students take physical education at this high-tech middle school on the Ewa plain, they don’t just play dodge ball or run laps around the track. We learn how their innovative P.E. program is using computer technology to help students get fit both physically and technologically.

 

From Mid Pacific Institute on Oahu: a profile of Na Hoku Hanohano Award-winning musician Mark Yamanaka. Yamanaka shares one of the biggest challenges of his life – not being of Hawaiian ancestry and wanting to play Hawaiian music.

 

From Moanalua High School on Oahu: the story of Moanalua history teacher Cris Pasquil, who uses non-traditional activities like group projects, skits and even music to instill a love of learning in his students. He draws inspiration from his own experience learning hula under kumu hula Robert Cazimero and his halau’s victory at the esteemed Merrie Monarch Festival earlier this year.

 

From Konawaena High School on Hawaii Island: the story of how their school is trying to develop one of only two high school lacrosse teams on the island. Konawaena teacher Daniel Curran is on a mission to make lacrosse a mainstream sport in Hawaii. Starting a team has many unique challenges, but students say the benefits are worth it.

 

From Maui Waena Intermediate School on Maui: the story of their experience at the 2015 Student Television Network conference and video competition in San Diego, California. Although the primary purpose of their trip was to participate in the video competition, they also spent a great deal of time volunteering for worthy San Diego-based causes. The Maui Waena students went on to win several awards at the competition, but they consider their hours of community service as the most rewarding part of the trip.