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HAWAIʻI STUDENTS FROM HIKI NŌ: THE NATION’S FIRST STATEWIDE STUDENT NEWS NETWORK, TAKE HOME NEARLY 20% OF AWARDS AT MAJOR NATIONAL COMPETITION

PBS HAWAI‘I – News Release

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For questions regarding this press release, contact:
Jody Shiroma
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April 8, 2019

 

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HAWAIʻI STUDENTS FROM HIKI NŌ: THE NATION’S FIRST STATEWIDE STUDENT NEWS NETWORK, TAKE HOME NEARLY 20% OF AWARDS AT MAJOR NATIONAL COMPETITION

HAWAIʻI STUDENTS FROM HIKI NŌ: NEWS NETWORK,
TAKE HOME NEARLY 20% OF AWARDS
AT MAJOR NATIONAL COMPETITION

 

HONOLULU—Hawaiʻi students from HIKI NŌ: The Nation’s First Statewide Student News Network, brought home nearly 20% of the awards at the prestigious Student Television Network (STN) Convention, a rigorous student media competition held March 28 – 31 in Seattle, Washington. The four-day event – open to intermediate and high schools across the U.S. – played host to 3,000 students and teachers.

 

Twenty-three Hawaiʻi schools competed and won a total of 35 awards.

 

PBS Hawaiʻi’s eight-year-old HIKI NŌ (Hawaiian for “Can Do”) educational initiative has helped Island students become national standouts in quality digital storytelling, a medium that is at the forefront with youth.

 

Through HIKI NŌ, students are learning not only the skills of digital storytelling but how to apply them to real-world challenges.

 

Ewa Makai Middle School teacher Ethan Toyota acknowledges HIKI NŌ’s role in their success at the competition. Toyota said, “We really wouldn’t have gotten this far without HIKI NŌ and all of the supportive Hawai‘i media teachers.” Ewa Makai Middle School took home three awards, including first place for Spot Feature.

 

First-time attendee, Janet Powell of Kauaʻi’s Island School, noted that her students could not have competed without HIKI NŌ training.

 

Under their teachers’ guidance, students from 90 public, private and charter schools from across the islands participate in HIKI NŌ, which is based on curriculum that builds skills in storytelling, critical thinking, teamwork and technology.

 

“PBS Hawaii’s HIKI NŌ program has proven to be a launchpad for many Hawaiʻi students in gaining these real-world skills and excelling at a national level. Congratulations to the students and their teachers!” Leslie Wilcox, PBS Hawaiʻi president and CEO said.

 

HIKI NŌ is primarily supported by charitable foundations with lead sponsors: Bank of Hawaii Foundation, Kamehameha Schools and ABC Stores.

 

Winning schools and categories listed below:

 

MIDDLE SCHOOL

 

Convention Recap (Middle School)
Second place: Maui Waena Intermediate School
Honorable mention: Ewa Makai Middle School

 

Spot Feature (Middle School)
First place: Ewa Makai Middle School
Second place: Island School
Honorable mention: Maui Waena Intermediate School

 

Movie Trailer (Middle School)
Third place: Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School
Honorable mention: Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School

 

Nat. Package (Middle School)
Third place: Waianae Intermediate School
Honorable mention: Highlands Intermediate School

 

Public Service Announcement (Middle School)
Second place: Maui Waena Intermediate School
Honorable mention: Kealakehe Intermediate School

 

Silent Film (Middle School)
Third place: Kapaa Middle School

 

Anchor Team (Middle School)
Honorable mention: Kapaa Middle School

 

Music Video (Middle School)
Second place: Waianae Intermediate School

 

Crazy 8s Broadcast News Magazine (Middle School)
First place: Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School
Second place: Maui Waena Intermediate School

 

Crazy 8s Short Film Fiction (Middle School)
Second place: Waianae Intermediate School
Third place: Ewa Makai Middle School
Honorable mention: Maui Waena Intermediate School

 

HIGH SCHOOL

 

Tell The Story Editing (High School)
Honorable mention: Moanalua High School

 

Nat. Package (High School)
Honorable mention: Maui High School

 

Commercial (High School)
Honorable mention: Maui High School

 

PSA (High School)
Third place: McKinley High School

 

Weather Reporting (High School)
Third place: Waianae High School

 

Multimedia Journalist (High School)
Honorable mention: Moanalua High School
Honorable mention: Waianae High School

 

Music Video (High School)
Honorable mention: Waiakea High School

 

Video Tip (High School)
Third place: Maui High School

 

Crazy 8s Broadcast News Magazine (High School)
Second place: Waianae High School

 

Crazy 8s Short Film Documentary (High School)
First place: Kamehameha Schools Maui High School

 

Crazy 8s Short Film Fiction (High School)
Honorable mention: Moanalua High School

 

Crazy 8s Broadcast Morning Show (High School)
Honorable mention: Maui High School

 

Excellence Awards

 

National Winner: Broadcast Excellence–Monthly Show
Waianae High School

 

South Pacific/International Regional Winner: Broadcast Excellence—Weekly Live/Taped News Show
Moanalua High School

 

Film Excellence—Best Directing
Moanalua High School

 

 

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
Literacy in Hawaiʻi

 

We know literacy as reading and writing, but it has become so much more. Literacy enables people, especially our keiki, to understand concepts and ideas and express opinions. Importantly, literacy allows them to grasp knowledge needed to meet the demands of today’s rapidly changing world. On the next INSIGHTS, we’ll discuss literacy in Hawaiʻi and look at how we are preparing children to not only participate in society but how to lead and solve problems. Join the conversation by phoning in, or leave us a comment on Facebook or Twitter.

 

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Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

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Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

 

 

The Evolution of HIKI NŌ

 

COVER STORY: The Evolution of HIKI NŌ by Robert Pennybacker - Director, Learning Initiatives, PBS Hawaiʻi

 

Students from O‘ahu’s Ka‘ala Elementary School in Wahiawā

Students from O‘ahu’s Ka‘ala Elementary School

 

Launching a New Season
Thursday, February 7, 7:30 pm

 

When HIKI NŌ premiered on February 28, 2011, the HIKI NŌ students from Ka‘ala Elementary School who grace the cover of this program guide were toddlers. The Maui Waena Intermediate School students who hosted that first episode are now seniors in college. If the students have matured over the eight years HIKI NŌ has been on the air, so has the program.

 

Eight years ago, a weekly half-hour show in which middle and high school students write, report, shoot and edit PBS-quality news features on topics that they selected was inconceivable. Before going on the air, the premise of HIKI NŌ (which means “Can Do” in the Hawaiian language) was based on the supposition that the same professional quality found in news stories already being created at Wai‘anae High School’s Searider media program could be duplicated in other schools across the islands. Nobody knew if this grand experiment would work.

 

Not only did it work – it flourished beyond expectations and spread to 90 public, charter, and private schools throughout state – including four elementary schools!

 

Clockwise from top left: Students from Maui’s Seabury Hall School, A student from O‘ahu’s Aliamanu Middle School with Pearl Harbor attack witness Jimmy Lee at the World War II Valor in the Pacific National Monument, Students from Maui's Lahaina Intermediate School, Students from Kauaʻi's Kapaʻa Middle School

Clockwise from top left: Students from Maui’s Seabury Hall School, A student from O‘ahu’s  Aliamanu Middle School with Pearl Harbor attack witness Jimmy Lee at the World War II Valor in the Pacific National Monument, Students from Maui’s Lahaina Intermediate School, Students from Kauaʻi’s Kapaʻa Middle School

 

HIKI NŌ has thrived because of its unique intersection of two distinct worlds: The education world and the real-life world of a public television station that must uphold the standards of its broadcast and online content.

 

The rigorous experience of refining their stories to meet PBS national standards has helped HIKI NŌ students to dominate national digital media competitions. At the Student Television Network’s 2018 Fall Challenge, Hawai‘i’s HIKI NŌ schools garnered 33% of the awards given out for that competition. Hawai‘i took home the most awards of any state (13), followed by California (10) and Florida (5).

 

After the launch of the program, teachers and others from the education world began to notice that the HIKI NŌ experience taught students much more than how to tell stories with pictures and sound. It helped them to develop the basic skills needed to survive in the new, global economy: critical thinking, creative problem solving, adaptability, collaboration, teamwork and entrepreneurialism. The recognition that these skills are essential to students’ success in college and beyond has led to dynamic partnerships between HIKI NŌ/PBS Hawai‘i and the state’s Early College and P-20 programs.

 

A core group of HIKI NŌ teachers informally known as Hawai‘i Creative Media proved to be the most effective trainers of other HIKI NŌ teachers and their students. Their importance to the process became so evident that they organized themselves as a nonprofit organization – the Hawai‘i Creative Media Foundation – whose mission is to provide students and teachers across the state with training in basic digital media skills.

 

The state’s CTE (Career Technology Education) program and the Department of Education have recognized the importance of this training and are making plans to fund the Hawai‘i Creative Media-led teacher/student workshops. Up until now these workshops have been paid for by PBS Hawai‘i. This shift toward the educational institutions funding the training of its teachers and students represents a sea change for HIKI NŌ. It acknowledges that the educators are equal partners in the HIKI NŌ process and brings into focus the distinct roles that the two worlds must play: Hawai‘i’s educators teach Hawai‘i’s students, while PBS Hawai‘i provides them with the real-world, professional experience, plus statewide (broadcast) and worldwide (online) platforms for their voices to be heard.

 

 

 

The Cat in the Hat

 

The Cat in the Hat Knows a Lot About That!TM is designed to spark a love of learning and an interest in science in preschool-aged children.

 

Based on Random House’s best-selling Beginner Book collection “The Cat in the Hat’s Learning Library™,” the TV series and online resources are designed to cultivate positive views about science and scientists among the next generation—the children who will become tomorrow’s citizens and innovators—and help families and teachers build communities of science explorers

 

In each program, the Cat in the Hat and his friends Sally and Nick go on a science adventure such as shrinking to bee-size to explore a hive and discover how honey is made; flying with birds to discover how and why they migrate; diving inside flowers to find out more about the animals that depend on them to live; or taking a snowcat to the Arctic to explore freezing and melting. Guided by the Cat, the children figure things out by engaging in science inquiry. They ask questions, make observations, make predictions, plan investigations, collect data, make discoveries, and generate and discuss ideas about how the world works.

 

Each half-hour television episode consists of two 11-minute animated adventures, along with corresponding short animated clips. Each adventure revolves around a specific science concept such as bird migration or animal camouflage. The animated clips feature songs and rhymes, interesting science facts, humorous science explorations by Thing One and Thing Two, and interviews of animals by Sally and Nick.

 

The Cat in the Hat Knows a Lot About That!™ is voiced by award-winning actor Martin Short and produced by Portfolio Entertainment Inc. and Collingwood O’Hare Productions, in association with Dr. Seuss Enterprises, Random House Children’s Entertainment, Treehouse, and PBS KIDS.

 

Sid the Science Kid

 

Sid the Science Kid is an award-winning educational animated television series that uses comedy and music to promote exploration, discovery and science readiness among preschoolers. This landmark production of 66 half-hour episodes, produced by The Jim Henson Company for PBS KIDS®, debuted on September 1, 2008, and has since been honored with five EMMY nominations and multiple prestigious awards (most recently the CINE Golden Eagle Award). Sid the Science Kid features a practical in-school science curriculum and celebrates children’s natural curiosity about science in everyday life. The energetic and inquisitive Sid starts each episode with a new question (“Why are my shoes shrinking?” “Why do bananas get mushy?”) and embarks on a fun-filled day of finding answers with the help of family and friends. Each episode of “Sid the Science Kid” focuses on a single scientific concept that is presented using Preschool Pathways to Science (PrePS©), a practical science readiness curriculum used in preschool classrooms that was created by cognitive researchers and preschool educators, incorporating lessons learned from developmental research as well as classroom experience.

 

The main goals of Sid the Science Kid are:

 

  • To encourage children to think, talk and work the way scientists do by building on preschoolers’ natural curiosity about the world.
  • To show that science is all around us – we all interact with and are capable of learning about scientific concepts.
  • To contribute to school readiness by fostering children’s intellectual skills, motivation to learn, and confidence in themselves as learners.
  • To support children’s learning by partnering with parents and teachers to create a “climate of curiosity” for children.

 

Each day, Sid, his friends, and our viewers practice doing what scientists do:

 

  • Observing objects, events, and people
  • Asking questions
  • Finding words to describe observations and to communicate ideas
  • Exploring and investigating to try to answer questions
  • Using science tools to observe and measure
  • Recording observations using simple drawings and basic charts
  • Using what they have observed, measured, and recorded to predict what might happen next and to ask more questions