crowd

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
Prison Reform

 

At the estimated cost of $525 million, the Governor wants to build a new State jail in Hālawa to replace the outdated and overcrowded O‘ahu Community Correctional Center in Kalihi. A lawmaker has a different, lower-cost replacement idea for OCCC: Buy the underutilized federal detention center near the Daniel K. Inouye International Airport and house inmates there. Meanwhile, a task force says the state should rethink its strategy from locking up people to rehabilitation. What do you think? Join the conversation on Prison Reform on INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I. You can phone in, or leave us a comment on Facebook or Twitter.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

 

 

THE CROWD & THE CLOUD
Viral vs. Virus

 

Sensors on asthma inhalers generate real-time maps of environmental dangers to help patients, physicians and disease detectives in Louisville, Kentucky. Street knowledge was also crucial in a historic medical breakthrough: John Snow’s mapping of cholera fatalities in 19th century London. In West Oakland, California, citizens confront air pollution and rising asthma rates by collecting traffic data. Local ordinances are changed and everyone breathes easier.

 

Can apps and maps combat globalized diseases in a warming world? Stories of citizen science fighting mosquito-borne diseases with apps and crowd-sourced data in Barcelona, Houston and New Orleans. In Kenya, Medic Mobile develops smart but low-cost software to give simple phones powerful capabilities to help community health workers improve maternal and child health.

 

Hosted by former NASA Chief Scientist Waleed Abdalati, “The Crowd & The Cloud” takes viewers on a global tour of the projects and people on the front lines of citizen science and crowdsourcing.

 

 

THE CROWD & THE CLOUD
Citizens + Scientists

 

Citizen scientists track air and water pollution at fracking sites in windswept Wyoming and five other states, using simple but science-based techniques developed by the “Bucket Brigade.” On idyllic East Coast trout streams, volunteers from Trout Unlimited monitor water quality regularly, generating baseline data that will prove invaluable in the event of future pollution events. Community members connected with professional researchers to tackle Flint’s drinking water crisis and now the same is happening in Philadelphia and other cities. In China, citizens use government data and a unique mobile app to report environmental crimes. When citizens and scientists partner, it’s a win-win for all concerned.